Nvidia Adds Five New GPUs to Their Mobile Line

first_imgNvidia adds five new GPU’s to their mobile GeForce lineup. These new chips have up to twice the performance and half the power consumption of previous chips. Citation: Nvidia Adds Five New GPU’s to Their Mobile Line (2009, June 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-06-nvidia-gpu-mobile-line.html nVidia’s Newest Mobile GPU Gems Explore furthercenter_img The G210M, GT 230M, GT 240M, GTS 250M and the GTS 260M will supplement the existing GTX280M, GTX260M, and GTS160M, which will provide a range of Windows 7 ready graphics options for notebooks and PC’s; all of which are DirectX 10.1 compatible.Nvidia stated that the chipsets contain between 512MB (G210M) to 1GB (all other chipsets) of on-board GDDR3 memory and are based on a new 40-nm manufacturing process. The GRS260M and GTS250M will provide 50 percent more power than the previous line of GPUs and will be most appealing to the serious gamer. Besides all being Windows 7 and DirectX 10.1 compatible, all cards, with the exception of the G210M supports hardware accelerated physics via Nvidia’s PhysX. Nvidia’s technology allows for processing physics calculations for games and other applications on the GPU. HybridPower is also supported which allowing the chips to go into a low-power mode when not required.All five chips also support Nvidia’s CUDA instruction set which runs computing applications on top of the graphics platform. CUDA is already being used in many multimedia applications ranging from DVD upscaling to H.264 video encoding. Nvidia’s new chipsets also support Nvidia’s PureVideo HD engine which hands off H.264, VC-1, and MPEG-2 processing onto the GPU. This frees up CPU processing which allows for smoother HD playback. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Read More →

3D holographic display seems to have ripped off patented technology w Video

first_img Explore further Innovision Labs’ HoloAD 3D Display As explained at CES, the HoloAD display works by projecting a set of three independent images onto the trapezoidal sides of the glass pyramid, providing 180 degrees of 3D viewing. Although the system doesn’t use true holographic coding, the image inside the box looks like an animated, full-color hologram. The display can also be integrated with real objects by placing objects in the display and creating a video that blends with the objects.There is no word on whether RealFiction plans to pursue legal action against Innovision, or even Innovision’s response to the claim of intellectual property theft. Now, a few websites are reporting that HoloAD’s technology seems to be remarkably similar to that developed by the Danish company RealFiction. RealFiction CEO Clas Durholm claims that Innovision blatantly ripped off the technology behind his company’s Dreamoc display, which is protected by several patents in Europe, as well patent applications in Japan and the US. (The patent numbers are 01066278-0001, 001041289-0001, 000852108-0001 and 000835806-0001 in Europe, Patent Application No. 2009-020417 in Japan, and Patent Application No. 29/332,917 in the US.) Comparing two videos below of RealFiction’s Dreamoc and Innovision’s HoloAD, the displays appear to be nearly identical. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) this past January, one of the more intriguing technologies was a 3D hologram-like display developed by Taiwan-based Innovision Labs. Called HoloAD, the glasses-free display can create 3D images in a glass pyramidal chamber that seems like a perfect tool for cutting-edge advertising. Citation: 3D ‘holographic’ display seems to have ripped off patented technology (w/ Video) (2010, April 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-04-3d-holographic-ripped-patented-technology.html Sony Unveils 360-Degree 3D Display (w/ Video) Innovision Labs’ HoloAD display (left) looks very similar to RealFiction’s Dreamoc display (right), whose technology is patented. Images are clips from videos (below). © 2010 PhysOrg.com More information: RealFiction.com and innovision.com.twvia: Singularity Hub and VizWorld RealFiction’s Dreamoc 3D Display last_img read more

Read More →

Glovefriendly touchscreen goes on exhibit

first_img © 2011 PhysOrg.com It’s not the first time a technology company has thought up a novel way to operate a touchscreen, but the talking point on the new SMK design is that the company has figured out how to deliver a capacitive touchscreen to work regardless of whether your hand is free or covered with a glove. SMK improved detection sensitivity by employing a chip that supports high-sensitivity detection and a sensor panel structure that has a high resistance to noise to prevent malfunctions caused by noise. As a result, it became possible to detect a gloved hand. The 6.5-inch panel can be scaled up to 8-inches. While in-vehicle navigation systems rather than mobile smartphones are the target, observers do not rule out the possibility that the screen might be picked up for clean room environments that require its users to wear gloves.SMK is a global parts manufacturer of telecom and electronics components. Its product range includes camera modules, plugs, jacks, remote-control units as well as touch panels. The “Touch Panel” segment of the business features pressure-sensitive resistance touch panels, capacitance type touch panels and backlit touch panels. SMK will exhibit the new glove-friendly panel at FPD (Flat Panel Displays) International 2011, starting today through October 28 in Yokohama.While the product is new in SMK’s portfolio, the idea of making a touchscreen operable with gloved hands is not new to the technology trade. The challenge of touchscreens sensitive to gloved hands has been taken up before. Earlier this year, at the Mobile World Congress, there was a lot of interest in a show demo by Synaptics. The device could work well with stylus as well as with a gloved hand and was aimed at mobile phones, not cars. Last year, on show at the same FPD event, was Hitachi’s version of a glove-friendly touchscreen.It’s clear that SMK joins a growing list of innovative demos that focus on novel touch technologies for ever=popular mobile computing devices. Simply, technology has become tactile. Users, whether gloved or ungloved, expect functionality literally at their fingertips.As for SMK, the company is to start volume production at a rate of 100,000 units (in terms of 6.5-inch panel) per month. Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — A new screen has been designed that can work with gloved hands, and it comes from Japan-based SMK. The target application will be car-navigation systems which drivers can operate while wearing gloves. The new screen is described as having a sensor panel structure that is noise-resistant. The design allows for a signal clear enough to be detected at high sensitivities. Fujitsu demonstrates new dual-touch resistive touch panelcenter_img More information: SMK Corp.via TechOn Citation: Glove-friendly touchscreen goes on exhibit (2011, October 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-10-glove-friendly-touchscreen.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Read More →

Graphene battery demonstrated to power an LED

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Schematic diagram showing the experimental setup of the device with Au-Ag electrodes. Image: arXiv:1203.0161v2 More information: Self-Charged Graphene Battery Harvests Electricity from Thermal Energy of the Environment, arXiv:1203.0161v2 [cond-mat.mes-hall] arxiv.org/abs/1203.0161AbstractThe energy of ionic thermal motion presents universally, which is as high as 4 kJbullet kg-1bullet K-1 in aqueous solution, where thermal velocity of ions is in the order of hundreds of meters per second at room temperature1,2. Moreover, the thermal velocity of ions can be maintained by the external environment, which means it is unlimited. However, little study has been reported on converting the ionic thermal energy into electricity. Here we present a graphene device with asymmetric electrodes configuration to capture such ionic thermal energy and convert it into electricity. An output voltage around 0.35 V was generated when the device was dipped into saturated CuCl2 solution, in which this value lasted over twenty days. A positive correlation between the open-circuit voltage and the temperature, as well as the cation concentration, was observed. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this finding is of practical value by lighting a commercial light-emitting diode up with six of such graphene devices connected in series. This finding provides a new way to understand the behavior of graphene at molecular scale and represents a huge breakthrough for the research of self-powered technology. Moreover, the finding will benefit quite a few applications, such as artificial organs, clean renewable energy and portable electronics. Researchers led by Zihan Xu of the Department of Applied Physics and Materials Research Centre at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, attached silver and gold electrodes to a graphene sheet, typically 7 mm x 7 mm in area, mounted on a silicon substrate. The assembly was then immersed in a saturated solution of copper chloride (CuCl2), and was found to produce an electrical voltage of 0.35 V. They also found that six assemblies arranged in series produced enough electricity to power a light-emitting diode (LED). The device continued to produce around the same voltage for 25 days, but after a month it dropped to about 40 mV.Graphene is a material that consists of a layer of carbon only one atom thick, and it has been the subject of intense research in recent years because of its unusual properties. One of these properties is an exceptionally high electron mobility.Xu and colleagues write in their paper that they think the voltage arises from the kinetic energy of the copper ions in the copper chloride solution, which they say is enough to knock electrons out of the graphene, and that these electrons then flow through the sheet. They noted that the voltage increases when the copper chloride solution is heated, and varies with its concentration. The group also found the voltage increased when the assembly was exposed to pulses of ultrasound, and they say this lends weight to the idea that kinetic energy is the source of the voltage, since the ultrasound would increase the velocity of the copper ions. Small voltages were also produced with ionic solutions such as NaCl and CuSO4. The researchers also carried out control experiments to rule out the possibility that chemical reactions were responsible for the voltage generated.Dr. Wanlin Guo, the graduate supervisor of one of Xu’s team (Guoan Tai), expressed skepticism at the proposed mechanism, and added that he had so far been unable to reproduce the findings in his own experiments, in which he used graphene sheets of varying sizes, mounted on varying substrates, and with different kinds of electrodes. He was unable to achieve voltages greater than around 0.1 mV.In 2011, a research group led by Nikhil Koratkar of New York’s Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute also reported on experiments in which graphene was shown to generate a voltage when an ionic solution was made to flow over the sheets. Dr. Guo, of Nanjing University in China, also refuted these results and carried out experiments that showed the interaction of the ions in solution with the electrodes was responsible for the voltage, rather than any interaction with the graphene.If Xu’s “graphene battery” is harnessing the thermal energy of motion of the ions to generate electricity, this source of energy is essentially unlimited. The researchers say their experimental results provide a “huge breakthrough” in the research into self-powered technology. Experimental setup of six graphene devices connected with a commercial LED before (a) and after (b) it was lighted up. Image: arXiv:1203.0161v2 (PhysOrg.com) — Scientists in Hong Kong have reported, in ArXiv, their experiments to make a graphene battery that they say generates an electrical current by drawing on the ambient thermal energy in the solution in which it is immersed. Explore further New graphene discovery boosts oil exploration efforts, could enable self-powered microsensors Citation: Graphene battery demonstrated to power an LED (2012, March 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-03-graphene-battery-power.html © 2011 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

Read More →

Google announces Floor Plan app for venue owners

first_imgNews of the Google launch this week did not go down unanimously well with some at the NY Tech Meetup, where New York City’s tech companies meet monthly. In an e-mail thread among members of the group on Friday, one NY Tech Meetup member said, “Can’t wait for someone to upload a bank’s blue prints.” Google’s maps go indoors with new mobile feature Citation: Google announces Floor Plan app for venue owners (2012, April 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-google-floor-app-venue-owners.html Explore further More information: google-latlong.blogspot.com/20 … -dot-for-people.html This week’s launch carries a message to business venue participants in the U.S. that Google wants to finish the job by roping in information and getting more details so that it can improve the accuracy of its indoor maps.As part of the launch, Google is “crowdsourcing” by asking Android venue owners who already uploaded their floor plans to please help.“When we announced the availability of indoor maps for Android last November, we also introduced Google Maps Floor Plans as a tool for business owners to upload the floor plans for their venue and have them appear in Google Maps for Android. Today we’re releasing the Google Maps Floor Plan Marker app, which enables those who’ve uploaded floor plans to improve the indoor location accuracy their visitors experience when using indoor maps within their venue.“Google is handing them some homework. When they install the new Google Maps Floor Plan Marker app, they will be walked through the process of going round the site and collecting GPS, cell tower, and publicly broadcast WiFi information. Google says the information can help Google make the My Location feature’s blue dot icon accessible for Android users when indoors and looking for a specific place in the building. “The time it takes to complete this process depends on the size of the venue, but you can pause and resume a marking task at any time if you want to take breaks,” according to the announcement.Indoor positioning accuracy does not come easily. Close-quarter confines and thick walls are just a few of the obstacles that place technology limits on navigation accuracy. Google knows it can improve and fine-tune indoor positioning with the help of its new Google Maps Floor Plan Marker for Android.Not all business owners are finding the very idea of uploading detailed floor plans of their sites enticing. If New York City is any kind of harbinger, Google might find that some owners have security issues with that very idea. © 2012 Phys.Org (Phys.org) — This week the team from Google Maps launched its Floor Plan Marker for Android in a bid to improve the accuracy if its indoor maps. Inside and outside Google, developers have seen real opportunity in introducing indoor location apps; Google made its mark on indoor maps with a November 2011 launch of indoor maps for Android. In doing so, Google wanted the public to know that this step was only the beginning. The indoor maps for Android were being made available at malls, airports, and some super-sized retailers — but Google said the application could ideally expand to many more venues. “We’ll continually add new indoor maps to public buildings across the world,” said Google. The November launch was confined to venue partnerships in the U.S. and Japan. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Read More →

Headset EEG hacking gives new meaning to PINheads

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further In a small-device world, bigger may still be better “Consumer-grade BCI devices are available for a few hundred dollars and are used in a variety of applications, such as video games, hands-free keyboards, or as an assistant in relaxation training,” according to the study. “There are application stores similar to the ones used for smart phones, where application developers have access to an API to collect data from the BCI devices,” they note. As the security risks involved in using consumer-grade BCI devices have not been studied, and the impact of malicious software with device access unexplored, the team had their work cut out for them.After having a look at the devices’ security implications, they have concluded that the technology can be turned against people to reveal information the victims assume is secret. Brain-computer interfaces, or BCIs, have been used in medical settings, involving expensive equipment, but the researchers concerned themselves with cheaper, commercial devices. (For example, Emotiv offers an Emotiv EPOC described as a high resolution, neuro-signal acquisition and processing wireless neuroheadset for $299 and NeuroSky offers inexpensive BCI “neuroscience headsets” with a company motto, “brain wave sensors for everybody.”)The researchers, who are from the universities of Oxford and Geneva and University of California, Berkeley, tested their mind-reading program using an Emotiv EEG device on 28 participants.The subjects did not know their brains were being used to extract private information; they were only told that they were going to participate in an experiment involving the privacy implications of using gaming EEG devices. After carrying out a number of experiments, they showed the feasibility of using a cheap consumer-level BCI gaming device to partially reveal private information of the users. By analyzing EEG signals in their experiments, they were able to detect which of presented stimuli were related to the user’s private information—credit cards, PIN numbers, persons known to the user, and user’s residence. The team said, “We show that the entropy of the private information is decreased on the average by approximately15% to 40% compared to random guessing attacks.”Their work was supported by National Science Foundation grants, Intel ISTC for Secure Computing, and the Carl-Zeiss Foundation. More information: www.usenix.org/conference/usen … -computer-interfacescenter_img (Phys.org) — Researchers at the Usenix Security conference earlier this month demonstrated a way to get into your brain and learn facts that you don’t want to reveal. Using a commercial off-the-shelf brain-computer interface, the researchers created a custom program designed to find out personal data such as address and PIN. The study, “On the Feasibility of Side-Channel Attacks with Brain-Computer Interfaces,” is by Ivan Martinovic, Doug Davies, Mario Frank, Daniele Perito, Tomas Ros, and Dawn Song. The authors point out that it is just such a commercial off the shelf brain computer interface—costing a few hundred dollars—that can run the brain-hacking show. (c) 2012 Phys.org Citation: Headset EEG hacking gives new meaning to PINheads (2012, August 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-08-headset-eeg-hacking-pinheads.htmllast_img read more

Read More →

Watersoluble silicon leads to dissolvable electronics

first_img(Phys.org)—Researchers working in a materials science lab are literally watching their work disappear before their eyes—but intentionally so. They’re developing water-soluble integrated circuits that dissolve in water or biofluids in months, weeks, or even a few days. This technology, called transient electronics, could have applications for biomedical implants, zero-waste sensors, and many other semiconductor devices. Explore further Citation: Water-soluble silicon leads to dissolvable electronics (2015, January 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-01-water-soluble-silicon-dissolvable-electronics.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (a) Optical and SEM images of a transient CMOS circuit dissolving at various times over 42 days. (b) Optical images of an ultrathin CMOS circuit on a silk substrate dissolving over 16 hours. Both circuits are immersed in phosphate-buffered saline solution at 70 °C and pH 10. Credit: Yin, et al. ©2015 AIP Publishing LLC © 2015 Phys.orgcenter_img The researchers, led by John A. Rogers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Fiorenzo Omenetto at Tufts University, have published a study in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters in which they analyzed the performance and dissolution times of various semiconductor materials. The work builds on previous research, by the authors and others, which demonstrated that silicon—the most commonly used semiconductor material in today’s electronic devices—can dissolve in water. Although it would take centuries to dissolve bulk silicon, thin layers of silicon can dissolve in more reasonable times at low but significant rates of 5-90 nm/day. The silicon dissolves due to hydrolysis, in which water and silicon react to form silicic acid. Silicic acid is environmentally and biologically benign. In the new study, the researchers analyzed the dissolution characteristics of silicon dioxide and tungsten, which they used to fabricate two electronics devices: field-effect transistors and ring oscillators. Under biocompatible conditions (37 °C, 7.4 pH), dissolution rates ranged from 1 week for the tungsten components, to between 3 months and 3 years for the silicon dioxide components. The dissolution rates can be controlled by several factors, such as the thickness of the materials, the concentration and type of ions in the solution, and the method used to deposit the silicon dioxide on the original substrate.As shown in the microscope images, the circuits do not dissolve in a uniform, layer-by-layer mode, but instead some places dissolve more rapidly than others. This is due to mechanical fractures in the fragile circuits, which cause the solution to penetrate through the layers more in some locations than in others. Although organic electronic materials are also often biodegradable, silicon-based electronics have the advantages of an overall higher performance and the use of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication processes that allow for mass-production.”The most significant finding is that there exist choices in materials, device designs and processing sequences that allow transient electronics to be produced in conventional silicon fabrication facilities,” Rogers told Phys.org. “The immediate consequence is a cost-effective, high-volume route to manufacturing.”Transient electronics could have a very wide range of novel applications, particular in the medical field. For example, they could be used to make catheters that dissolve; biodegradable sensors that monitor the kidney, heart, and lungs; and water-soluble electronics that monitor bacterial infections after surgery. As for environmental applications, transient electronics could be used as sensors that transmit data from remote locations, and then degrade into the soil to eliminate waste.The researchers plan to work toward these applications in the near future.”We are working on building more advanced circuits, and doing so with commercial foundries, and on back-end assembly techniques that will allow these circuits to be deployed on a range of biodegradable polymer substrates,” Rogers said. More information: Lan Yin, et al. “Materials and fabrication sequences for water soluble silicon integrated circuits at the 90 nm node.” Applied Physics Letters. DOI: 10.1063/1.4905321 ‘Transient electronics’: Biocompatible electronic devices dissolve in body, environment (w/ Video) Journal information: Applied Physics Letterslast_img read more

Read More →

Physicists measure complementary properties using quantum clones

first_img“In quantum mechanics, measurements disturb the state of the system being measured,” Thekkadath told Phys.org. “This is a hurdle physicists face when trying to characterize quantum systems such as single photons. In the past, physicists successfully used very gentle measurements (known as weak measurements) to circumvent this disturbance. “As such, our work is not the first to determine complementary properties of a quantum system. However, we’ve shown that a different strategy can be used. It is based on a rather naïve idea. Suppose we want to measure the position and momentum of a particle. Knowing that these measurements will disturb the particle’s state, can we first copy the particle, and measure position on one copy and momentum on the other? This was our initial motivation. But it turns out that copying alone is not enough. The measured copies must also be entangled for this strategy to work. “This is what we showed experimentally. Instead of determining the position and momentum of a particle, we determined complementary polarization properties of single photons. You would intuitively expect this strategy to fail due to the no-cloning theorem. However, we showed that is not the case, and this is the greatest significance of our result: measuring complementary properties of the twins directly reveals the quantum state of the copied system.”As the physicists explain, one of the most important aspects of the demonstration is working around the limitations of the no-cloning theorem.”In our daily lives, information is often copied, such as when we photocopy a document, or when DNA is replicated in our bodies,” Thekkadath explained. “However, at a quantum level, information cannot be copied without introducing some noise or imperfections. We know this because of a mathematical result known as the no-cloning theorem. This has not stopped physicists from trying. They developed strategies, known as optimal cloning, that minimize the amount of noise introduced by the copying process. In our work, we go one step further. We showed that it is possible to eliminate this noise from our measurements on the copies using a clever trick that was theoretically proposed by Holger Hofmann in 2012. Our results do not violate the no-cloning theorem since we never physically produce perfect copies: we only replicate the measurement results one would get with perfect copies.”In their experiments, the physicists demonstrated the new method using photonic twins, but they expect that the ability to make precise, simultaneous measurements of complementary properties on twins can also be implemented with quantum computers. This could lead to many practical applications, such as providing an efficient method to directly measure high-dimensional quantum states, which are used in quantum computing and quantum cryptography.”Determining the state of a system is an important task in physics,” Thekkadath said. “Once a state is determined, everything about that system is known. This knowledge can then be used to, for example, predict measurement outcomes and verify that an experiment is working as intended. This verification is especially important when complicated states are produced, such as the ones needed in quantum computers or quantum cryptography.”Typically, quantum states are determined tomographically, much like how the brain is imaged in a CAT scan. This approach has the limitation that the state is always globally reconstructed. In contrast, our method determines the value of quantum states at any desired point, providing a more efficient and direct method than conventional methods for state determination.”We experimentally demonstrated our method using single photons. But, our strategy is also applicable in a variety of other systems. For instance, it can be implemented in a quantum computer by using only a single quantum logic gate. We anticipate that our method could be used to efficiently characterize complicated quantum states inside a quantum computer.” The ability to determine the complementary properties of quantum states in this way not only has implications for understanding fundamental quantum physics, but also has potential applications for quantum computing, quantum cryptography, and other technologies.The physicists, Guillame S. Thekkadath and coauthors at the University of Ottawa, Ontario, have published a paper on determining complementary properties of quantum clones in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.As the physicists explain, in the classical world it’s possible to simultaneously measure a system’s complementary states with exact precision, and doing so reveals the system’s state. But as Heisenberg theoretically proposed in 1927 when he was beginning to develop his famous uncertainty principle, any measurement made on a quantum system induces a disturbance on that system. This disturbance is largest when measuring complementary properties. For instance, measuring the position of a particle will disturb its momentum, changing its quantum state. These joint measurements have intrigued physicists ever since the time of Heisenberg.As a way around the difficulty of performing joint measurements, physicists have recently investigated the possibility of making a copy of a quantum system, and then independently measuring one property on each copy of the system. Since the measurements are performed separately, they would not be expected to disturb each other, yet they would still reveal information about the original quantum system because the copies share the same properties as the original.This strategy immediately encounters another quantum restriction: due to the no-cloning theorem, it’s impossible to make a perfect copy of a quantum state. So instead, the physicists in the new study investigated the closest quantum analog to copying, which is optimal cloning. The parts of the clones’ states that share the exact same properties as those of the input state are called “twins.” Whereas theoretical perfect copies of a quantum state are uncorrelated, the twins are entangled. The physicists showed that, as a consequence of this entanglement, independently measuring the complementary properties on each twin is equivalent to simultaneously measuring the complementary properties of the input state. This leads to the main result of the new study: that simultaneously measuring the complementary properties of twins gives the state (technically, the wave function) of the original quantum system. Citation: Physicists measure complementary properties using quantum clones (2017, August 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-08-physicists-complementary-properties-quantum-clones.html Explore further Blind quantum computing for everyone Schematic of the experimental setup, in which complementary properties x and y are jointly measured. Credit: Thekkadath et al. ©2017 American Physical Society More information: G. S. Thekkadath, R. Y. Saaltink, L. Giner, and J. S. Lundeen. “Determining Complementary Properties with Quantum Clones.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.050405, Also at arXiv:1701.04095 [quant-ph] This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Physical Review Letters (Phys.org)—In quantum mechanics, it’s impossible to precisely and simultaneously measure the complementary properties (such as the position and momentum) of a quantum state. Now in a new study, physicists have cloned quantum states and demonstrated that, because the clones are entangled, it’s possible to precisely and simultaneously measure the complementary properties of the clones. These measurements, in turn, reveal the state of the input quantum system. © 2017 Phys.orglast_img read more

Read More →

Can We Touch

first_imgField, a developmental psychologist by training, went on to found the Touch Research Institute at the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine. She was a pioneer in highlighting the effects of “touch deprivation” among kids, famously those in orphanages. She explained to me that the effects are pervasive, influencing so many bodily systems that kids are diagnosed with “failure to thrive,” resulting in permanent physical and cognitive impairment, smaller stature, and social withdrawal later in life—which often includes aversion to physical contact. Physical touch doesn’t make adults larger, but its effects are still coming to light. Field has published similar findings about the benefits of touch in full-term infants, and then children and pregnant women, adults with chronic pain, and people in retirement homes. Studies that involved as little as 15 daily minutes found that touch alone, even devoid of the other supportive qualities it usually signifies, seems to have myriad benefits. Her efforts started with premature babies, when she found that basic human touch led them to quickly gain weight. An initial small study, published in the journal Pediatrics in 1986, showed that just 10 days of “body stroking and passive movements of the limbs” for less than an hour led babies to grow 47 percent faster. They averaged fewer days in the hospital and accrued $3,000 less in medical bills. The effect has been replicated multiple times. Tiffany Field has spent decades trying to get people to touch one another more. The hug, specifically, has been repeatedly linked to good health. In a more recent study that made headlines about hugs helping the immune system, researchers led by the psychologist Sheldon Cohen at Carnegie Mellon University isolated 400 people in a hotel and exposed them to a cold virus. People who had supportive social interactions had fewer and less severe symptoms. Physical touch (specifically hugging) seemed to account for about a third of that effect. (The researchers conclude: “These data suggest that hugging may act as an effective means of conveying support.”) Cohen and his colleagues continued to show other health benefits of physical contact, such as a 2018 reveal in the journal PLOS titled “Receiving a Hug Is Associated With the Attenuation of Negative Mood That Occurs on Days With Interpersonal Conflict.” Read the whole story: The Atlanticlast_img read more

Read More →

Big cat business

first_imgUnder I am the Tiger initiative, capital is going to witness some fine art work dedicated to the cause. The exhibition will showcase work of various artists from across the country and overseas like Ashok Hazare from Ajmer, Aparna Caur from Delhi and Anjolie Ela Menon, the Singh Twins from Liverpool along with others.The exhibition will take place at Azad Bhawan gallery the primary attraction will be The Singh Twins work  They have also mentored various art students from from four art schools in London, to work for the initiative. Shalini Wazir, the brain behind the cause have exhibited and staged the plays at places like Europe and UK. Inspired by her innovation, the Singh twins especially created art pieces for the cause. The exhibition will be followed by I am a Tiger play which will be staged at Azad Bhawan on friday.last_img read more

Read More →