Head of Chinese Energy NGO Sentenced to 3 Years in

first_img Head of Chinese Energy NGO Sentenced to 3 Years in US Prison By William Patrick March 26, 2019 Updated: March 27, 2019 Share this article Chi Ping Patrick Ho sentenced in a bribery trial by District Judge Loretta Preska in New York, on March 25, 2019. (Reuters/Jane Rosenberg) China-US News Show Discussioncenter_img Share The former head of an international non-governmental organization that was backed by a Chinese energy conglomerate, was sentenced to three years in prison on March 25 for bribery and money laundering.Patrick Ho was the secretary-general of the China Energy Fund Committee, an NGO based in both Hong Kong and Arlington, Virginia. Ho was also a top lieutenant of Ye Jianming, a Chinese oil tycoon whose company, CEFC China Energy Company Limited, (CEFC China), made billions of dollars in Russia, Eastern Europe, and parts of Africa.The company also sought business in South Sudan and Iraq, among other distressed places, courted North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, and attempted to maneuver into a middleman position with Iran to avoid oil sanctions.CEFC China backed Ho’s registered charitable organization, which even held a “special consultative status” with the United Nations. But Ho’s activities often focused on advancing the interests of Ye’s energy giant, which included seeking favor in Washington.Ho’s first phone call after his November 2017 arrest for allegedly bribing top officials in Chad and Uganda was to James Biden, the brother of former Vice President Joe Biden, The New York Times reported in December 2018. Ye himself had met privately with Joe Biden’s son, Hunter Biden, in Miami in May 2017.Ho was convicted of violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act regarding Chad and Uganda in December 2018, while Ye has not been charged with any wrongdoing in the United States. “Patrick Ho schemed to bribe the leaders of Chad and Uganda in order to secure unfair business advantages for the Chinese energy company he served,” said Geoffrey S. Berman, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, on March 25.“Foreign corruption undermines the fairness of international markets, erodes the public’s faith in its leaders, and is deeply unfair to the people and businesses that play by the rules,” Berman added.According to prosecutors, Ho orchestrated the two bribery schemes on behalf of CEFC China, which is based in Shanghai and operates internationally across multiple industries, including oil, gas, and banking. During Ho’s trial, prosecutors outlined other areas of business, including an attempt to deal arms in conflict zones.In September 2014, Ho attended a U.N. General Assembly in New York City while CEFC China was attempting to expand its business operations into the African country of Chad. Ho, in his role as the chief officer of a charitable NGO, secured a meeting with the former Minister of Foreign Affairs in Senegal, who had a personal relationship with Chad President Idriss Déby.Weeks later, Ho and CEFC China executives met with Déby in Chad to discuss access to lucrative oil rights in the impoverished country. A second meeting took place in Chad in December 2014 and ended with Ho presenting Déby with $2 million in cash concealed in several gift boxes, prosecutors said.Déby rejected the offer but later accepted it as a donation to the people of Chad. Ho would later argue that the payment was indeed a donation from his charitable NGO, but a federal court jury in Manhattan found the payment constituted a bribe.Upon his conviction, Ho told Hong Kong reporters in Cantonese, “Expected. It’s like that,” according to the South China Morning Post.Incidentally, CEFC China never obtained the oil rights it paid for, prosecutors determined.While attending the same U.N. General Assembly in 2014, Ho met with General Assembly President Sam Kutesa. According to the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the two men developed a professional relationship over the course of Kutesa’s one-year tenure at the U.N. that included plans for a “strategic partnership” between CEFC China and Uganda when Kutesa returned to his native country.In February 2016, Kutesa went back to Uganda and assumed the role of Foreign Minister. In the interim, his relative, Yoweri Museveni, had been re-elected president of Uganda.Kutesa then solicited a payment from Ho that was meant to appear as a charitable contribution. Ho agreed, and requested an invitation to Museveni’s inauguration, private meetings with Museveni and other high-ranking Ugandan officials, and a list of future business projects for CEFC China.Three months later, Ho and CEFC China executives traveled to Uganda for a meeting, but not before wiring $500,000 to Kutesa’s suspicious charitable foundation. The money was wired through Manhattan, giving the Southern District of New York jurisdiction.Ye, who was chairman of CEFC China, provided another $500,000 in cash for Museveni’s reelection campaign, though he had already won the election.“Ho intended these payments to influence Kutesa and Museveni to use their official power to steer business advantages to CEFC China,” prosecutors said.Kutesa and Museveni followed through on Ho’s requests, and further helped CEFC China acquire a Ugandan bank so they could “partner” in the company’s future profits while operating in the central African country.“Patrick Ho bribed officials at the highest levels of government in Chad and Uganda in pursuit of lucrative oil deals and other business opportunities, all while using a U.S.-based NGO to conceal his criminal scheme,” said Assistant Attorney General Brian A. Benczkowski.While Ho was the focus of the two African bribery schemes, both were influence-peddling operations in service to his boss, Ye Jianming. And Ye was involved in his own coordinated attempts to influence foreign governments, including U.S. officials and institutions.According to the New York Times, Ye met with former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan in 2015, and donated nearly $100,000 to the Clinton Foundation and another $500,000 to Columbia University through a separate CEFC China-backed charitable group.Ye had also proposed a partnership to Hunter Biden after two meetings in 2017 to invest in American infrastructure and energy. Although it’s unclear if Biden partnered with Ye or CEFC China in any business dealings, Biden managed an investment firm at the time called Rosemont Seneca Partners, which was co-founded by Chris Heinz, the stepson of former U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry.In imposing the 3-year prison sentence on Monday, U.S. District Judge Loretta A. Preska quoted the U.N. Convention Against Corruption, stating, “Corruption is an insidious plague” that is “found in all countries—big and small, rich and poor—but it is in the developing world that its effects are most destructive.”  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   last_img read more

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Tired of Waiting for a Federal Fix Border Sheriff

first_img Tired of Waiting for a Federal Fix, Border Sheriff Tackles Cartel Crime With Bold Action By Charlotte Cuthbertson June 12, 2019 Updated: June 13, 2019 BISBEE, Arizona—Tired of waiting for the federal government to fix the border, Sheriff Mark Dannels decided to take matters into his own hands. A personal run-in with a Mexican cartel only cemented his motivation to rid his county of cross-border crime.Five years ago, Dannels’s son, Sierra Vista police officer Justin Dannels, fatally shot a man allegedly connected to the Sinaloa cartel when the man tried to run him over during a traffic stop.The following day, Dannels and his son both received threatening phone calls from Mexico. Then cartel members showed up in the sheriff’s backyard at midnight.“Hell of a scary. But, I’ll tell you, if you run from them, you’re no better than they are,” Dannels said on May 5.“Long story short is, we really took a deep look at what we were doing here and that’s one of the reasons that we said, ‘You ain’t going to threaten us, and you’re not going to scare us out of what we need to do,’” he said. “That’s one of the reasons we’ve pushed forward.”Instead of capitulating, Dannels doubled down on ridding his county of cartel activity and cross-border crime. Cochise County in southeast Arizona is now one of the most secure of the 31 counties along the southwest border. It is a rare success story amid an unprecedented border crisis that is overwhelming the system. border security A sign in Carr Canyon warning of possible smuggling and illegal immigrants in the area, near the U.S.-Mexico border in Sierra Vista, Arizona, on May 5, 2019. (Charlotte Cuthbertson/The Epoch Times)The major new effort started in January 2017 and the formula Dannels adopted is simple: Place hundreds of cameras to detect traffickers and smugglers, catch them, and prosecute them.“We put our cameras in areas where Border Patrol wasn’t going,” he said. “We went to the river areas, we went into the mountain areas, we went to the desert areas. And this is based on intel from our ranchers and our community folks saying, ‘We have a problem on our property.’ We’ve gone to private lands and we put those cameras strategically in areas where it helps identify the smugglers.”The sheriff’s border team, called SABRE (Southeastern Arizona Border Region Enforcement), run by Sgt. Tim Williams, has placed 400 trail cameras in the county so far—with an estimated 700 to be up and running by year’s end.The money for the cameras was raised from private donations—Dannels refuses to accept government money, with strings attached, to expand the program.border security Sgt. Tim Williams of the Cochise County Sheriff’s Office in Bisbee, Arizona, on May 8, 2019. (Charlotte Cuthbertson/The Epoch Times)The SABRE team piloted a test on rancher John Ladd’s land that shares 10.5 miles of border with Mexico border—from the Naco international port of entry to the San Pedro River (which runs from Mexico into the United States).The border line has a legacy bollard fence from 2006 that contains several sets of floodgates embedded into the bottom of it that are left open from July 1 to October 1 every year. When open, the gates leave four gaps, each about 7 feet high and 6 feet wide. The fence stops altogether at the river.“The biggest thing that we dealt with was backpacking drugs—the 50- to 70-pound bundles on the back,” Dannels said. He said countywide, Ladd’s ranch was probably the most impacted by smuggling, but the pilot program brought it to a halt.“There were 37 experienced smugglers [on his property] that are now sitting in prison,” Dannels said.border security Cmdr. Kenny Bradshaw of the Cochise County Sheriff’s Office, stands next to the floodgates within the U.S.-Mexico border fence west of Naco, Arizona, on May 8, 2019. (Charlotte Cuthbertson/The Epoch Times)Seeing immediate success, the program continued to expand and became fully operational in August 2017.Interdictions of illegal aliens and drugs increased as cameras caught more activity. The SABRE team has two National Guard members watching the cameras 24/7 and another two analyzing the footage and photos that are captured.Some trends started emerging, according to Williams. The cartel significantly increased their scouting operations, drug smuggling routes were changed, drug mules were now being recruited from outside the local area, and drug smuggling routes turned into human smuggling routes.Read MoreBrennan, Clapper Call Border Crisis ‘Nonexistent Threat’ in Lawsuit Against Border WallBorder Patrol Catches ‘Largest Group’ of Illegal Immigrants Near United States BorderObama’s Border Patrol Chief: Border Crisis ‘Worst in Our History’Trump: Additional Border Troops Will Be Armed After Incident With Mexican SoldiersHuman-Trafficking Crisis at the Border—Turning Point USA’s PaulinaCartels Seek to Overwhelm Southern Border, Threaten Americans—Rep. Michael CloudCartels Get 90 Percent of Drugs Past Border Patrol in Rio Grande City“We’ve seen well over 2,000 illegal aliens on the cameras, over 170 drug mules,” Williams said. “It’s still mostly marijuana that we’re seeing being smuggled across the border. They’ve gotten away from doing the big, long 20-people trains. It’s all pretty small stuff that we’re seeing.”He said his team will carry out the interdiction if it’s drug smuggling; however, they have to call in Border Patrol for human smuggling, as that’s a federal issue.The overall catch rate has increased from about 16 percent to about 60 percent, and with 100 percent prosecution for drug smugglers, Dannels said the cartel has started moving its drug operations to avoid his county.“If we see you on camera, it’s a good chance we’re going to get you. And then you’re going to prison from there,” he said. “What we’re seeing now is not a lot of drugs, but a lot of the human smuggling, and we turn that over to Border Patrol.”border securty A motion-activated trail camera set by the Cochise County Sheriff’s Office captures several illegal aliens carrying large backpacks on April 2, 2019. (Courtesy of Cochise County Sheriff’s Office)100 Percent ConvictionThe footage from the cameras provide hard evidence in court, contributing to the county’s high conviction rate, to which Dannels credits the county attorney as a vital part of the program’s success.But, Dannels said, he has weathered a lot of criticism over it, especially when he started jailing juveniles.The cartel was using juveniles to smuggle drugs—mostly through the port of entry at Naco—knowing that the federal government wouldn’t prosecute them.“It’s not that they can’t, they don’t. They don’t have the resources, or the will, or whatever,” Dannels said. “So now we have a program where we said we will take them. Any juvenile between the ages of 14 to 17, we take them all. The 14-to-17s are remanded as adults for smuggling, and they go to prison for two years.”border security The port of entry at the U.S.-Mexico international boundary in Naco, Arizona, on May 4, 2019. (Charlotte Cuthbertson/The Epoch Times)Dannels said it took about a year to almost eliminate the problem. “We went from one or two remanding juveniles charged for smuggling, to 36 a day,” he said.“I took a beating on that: ‘You’re locking up kids.’ The consular got mad at me. Everybody got mad at me: ‘This is costing us a lot of money.’ I said, ‘Bill the cartel.’“We’re down to one or two again. I said they’re safer in my hands than they are the cartel’s. At least they’ve got education, health, counseling, a structured life. They’re all in our prison right now, so they’ll be coming out soon. It’ll be interesting what the return on that is. I don’t know yet. … We hope they go back and find a better life.”Most of the jailed juveniles are Mexican nationals, but a few are American citizens, he said.“Now, they [the cartels] are using juveniles for human smuggling and I can’t do a damn thing about that [because] immigration is a federal thing,” he said.border security A motion-activated trail camera set by the Cochise County Sheriff’s Office captures several illegal aliens hauling suspected drugs in large backpacks on March 16, 2017. (Courtesy of Cochise County Sheriff’s Office)The Only Relief in 30 YearsCochise County itself shares 83 miles of border with Mexico and sits next to New Mexico. The county is one of three that fall within the 262-mile Tucson Border Patrol Sector, which encompasses most of Arizona’s border with Mexico, from New Mexico to the Yuma county line. The other two counties are Pima and Santa Cruz.A grateful recipient of the SABRE team’s efforts is Ladd, the rancher.“That’s the only relief that we’ve had with the drugs in 30 years,” Ladd said on May 9. “We haven’t had drugs on this ranch for … a year ago in February was the last one. And that’s never happened before. [The] men on that SABRE team have completely shut down this drug corridor.”Ladd’s family has ranched on the land for 123 years. “We were here before the border was,” he said.He is one of about 30 border ranchers with whom the SABRE team works closely, including by giving them police radios to call directly into dispatch if needed.border security John Ladd on his ranch by the U.S.-Mexico border in Cochise County, Arizona, on May 9, 2019. (Charlotte Cuthbertson/The Epoch Times)“The last 30 years, illegal immigration has affected the way we ranch, it affected my livelihood, my personal life, everything else. We deal with it every day,” Ladd said.Open gates and broken fences are just one of the major problems caused by illegal immigration and drug smuggling.“We’ve lost millions of gallons of water at our watering system, when they break pipes trying to get a drink, then just let it run,” Ladd said. “We’ve been broke into—everything we’ve owned has been stolen at least once.”He said he spends 50 percent of his time checking fences, gates, and water.“I shouldn’t have to do that every day. I’ve quit fixing all the interior fences and I just check the perimeter fence, keep cattle out of the highway or in Mexico. That’s what my whole fence deal is, just keep them on the ranch,” he said.Not being able to have interior fencing has increased his costs, as he cannot selectively breed his best stock. All his bulls have to be top grade, and he can’t keep cows in separate pastures.He said the peak volume of illegal immigrants crossing his land was during the decade from 1995 to 2005.“They were catching an average of 300 a day just on our ranch, for 10 years,” he said. “[Then in 2016,] when Trump got elected, it just stopped overnight. And it was the threat of what he said he was going to do. It took them [the cartels] a year to figure out that what Trump was saying was unenforceable because Congress won’t support Trump. So here they come again.”Ladd estimates he gets around 10 to 12 illegal aliens on his land a day now, and he says Border Patrol catches about 50 percent of them.“And that’s better than it used to be. They used to catch one in six,” he said. “I don’t know of any asylum seekers. I’m sure there might be a few. But they’re young men, Central Americans, and whether they’re legitimately coming to work or are they scouting for something else, coming to work for the cartel in America, I don’t know.”border security A motion-activated trail camera set by the Cochise County Sheriff’s Office captures an illegal alien in camouflage clothing and carpet shoes on Feb. 17, 2017. (Courtesy of Cochise County Sheriff’s Office)Ladd said the illegal aliens he sees wear full camouflage gear, as well as carpet shoes to eliminate their tracks. “They all have cellphones. It’s very sophisticated,” he said.“The border isn’t about immigration anymore, it’s about smuggling. And smuggling transforms into power and money. When I say the border is about smuggling and money and power, Congress is right in the middle of that, because [they] don’t want to hurt the cheap labor. Corporate America’s getting rich over the deal, paying everybody under the table.”Ladd said Congress could easily fix the problem. “We want people coming, but we can’t have this major invasion with people that we have no idea what they are,” he said.A Replicable FormulaDannels is proud of his county’s success so far and encourages other sheriffs to pick up the formula and run with it. He has also shared it with the Department of Homeland Security, of which he is on the advisory council.“The biggest thing we’ve got going in Cochise County is the will and the action to back it up,” he said. “I mean … when you see people scared to leave their homes, you see people victimized at the hands of the cartel, to hell with that, we’re going to go after them. We got to do something different. I take that seriously. If I expect Washington, D.C., to fix it, I’m in trouble. And I’m not picking on them; they move like snails.”Dannels said although statistics show a decrease in crime in his county in response to the program, it’s the feedback he gets from the ranchers and residents that he’s most proud of.“The ranchers and the farmers and the citizens living in the rural areas that have been impacted the last 25 years, will tell you it’s the best it’s been in almost 30 years. That is the best report card you can get,” he said.“We didn’t put politics into this. Politics has no business in policing. We don’t care what your political affiliation, we care about how we can enhance that quality of life for the citizens of Cochise County. And we did that.“You’ve got to establish the will and go for it, and don’t look back.” Follow Charlotte on Twitter: @charlottecuthbo Cochise County Sheriff Mark Dannels points to the U.S.–Mexico border in Sierra Vista, Arizona, on May 5, 2019. (Charlotte Cuthbertson/The Epoch Times) Share this article US News center_img Show Discussion  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Sharelast_img read more

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first_img Share this article US News Jonathan Browning, then-CEO of Volkswagen Group of America, introduces the company’s new Passat at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, on Jan. 10, 2011. The Passat has been built in Chattanooga, Tenn., creating 12,000 jobs, according to Volkswagen. GEOFF ROBINS/AFP/Getty Images Share  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   center_img United Auto Workers (UAW) officials will appeal to Congress to change the nation’s labor laws after workers at a Volkswagen assembly plant in Tennessee voted for a second time against joining the storied union.In results that are pending certification by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), Volkswagen (VW) maintenance and production employees rejected the petition to organize and join the UAW, 833 to 776. Ninety-three percent of eligible VW employees voted, according to VW.The margin of victory for the anti-union workers was slightly smaller than the 712–626 first vote on the issue in 2014. The union narrowly won a 2015 vote by the maintenance workers, but VW officials insisted on a vote by the full workforce, and the NLRB agreed.Had the UAW won the vote, the VW plant would have become the union’s first organized foreign-owned auto production facility in the southern U.S. states. The only UAW auto plant in the South now is General Motors’ Spring Hill, Tennessee, facility.All the rest of VW’s worldwide non-management workforce is unionized. The 3,800 employees at the Chattanooga plant produce VW’s Passat family sedan and Atlas sport-utility vehicle.Union spokesman Brian Rothenberg issued a statement after the vote late on June 14, saying: “VW workers endured a system where even when they voted, the company refused to bargain. Clearly, Volkswagen was able to delay bargaining with maintenance and, ultimately, this vote among all production and maintenance workers through legal games until they could undermine the vote. “Our labor laws are broken. Workers should not have to endure threats and intimidation in order to obtain the right to collectively bargain. The law doesn’t serve workers, it caters to clever lawyers who are able to manipulate the NLRB process,” Rothenberg said.Rothenberg was referring to the more than three years that elapsed after the December 2015 vote. The union appealed when VW officials refused to recognize the result as creating a “micro-union” with 168 members.Rather than pursuing what would have been a lengthy and expensive administrative adjudication process at NLRB, the UAW dropped its appeal in return for the June 14 vote.In a June 17 interview with The Epoch Times, Rothenberg said union officials are pushing for passage of H.R. 2474, the Protecting the Right to Organize Act of 2019. House Education and Labor Committee Chairman Bobby Scott (D-Va.) introduced the bill that is in the draft stage.“Among other things, what it does is it prevents companies from playing some of these legal games. It prevents these captive audience meetings by Volkswagen, where they forced everybody in the plant to attend,” Rothenberg told The Epoch Times. “And it gives fairness and it gives an assist to workers rights to make a decision, not outside money, not corporate money and not lawyers playing games.”Rothenberg said the NLRB, during the Obama administration, had recognized the smaller union from the 2015 vote, but “when the Trump appointees came in, they pulled the issue from the courts, saying they wanted to rule on the issue of the micro-unions, but then nothing ever happened.”Tennessee’s mostly Republican national political leadership generally lauded the June 14 vote.Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), the state’s senior senator, told the Chattanooga Times-Free Press that “this sends a signal across the Southeast that the UAW is probably going to have a difficult time organizing any of these plants.”Alexander, noting that Tennessee is a right-to-work state that protects employees’ right to choose not to join a union as a condition of employment, said he thinks the VW “looked at our state and they saw Nissan, which has done well without a union and, in fact, has created the most efficient auto plant in North America.”Alexander was referring to the Smyrna, Tennessee, plant opened in 1983 by Nissan, which now produces five Nissan models and one Infiniti model. Nissan has a second plant at Decherd, Tennessee. Neither plant is unionized.Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) tweeted on June 15 that the Chattanooga VW workers “know we don’t need the @UAW to come from Detroit and tell Tennessee workers and employers what to do here.”Rep. Chuck Fleischmann (R-Tenn.), whose district includes the plant, said in a statement that he was “pleased that workers at the Volkswagen plant voted to preserve their ability to deal directly with their employer.”Fleischmann pointed to what he called the UAW’s “track record of failure in Detroit” as the basis of his opposition to the union’s efforts to organize the VW plant.Fleischmann also said that “after this third failed attempt to unionize, this issue will not rise again, and Tennessee can continue to use its status as a right-to-work state to be an economic leader in the region and across the nation.”Contact Mark Tapscott at mark.tapscott@epochtimes.nyc UAW Loses Another Chattanooga Vote, Wants Reform of Labor Laws By Mark Tapscott June 17, 2019 Updated: June 17, 2019 Show Discussionlast_img read more

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No Charges for Officer in Garner Chokehold Death

first_img No Charges for Officer in Garner Chokehold Death By The Associated Press July 16, 2019 Updated: July 16, 2019 NEW YORK—Federal prosecutors said on July 16 that they won’t bring criminal charges against a New York City police officer in the 2014 chokehold death of Eric Garner.The decision to end a yearslong civil rights investigation without charges was made by Attorney General William Barr and was announced the day before the five-year anniversary of the deadly encounter, just as the statute of limitations was set to expire.Civil rights prosecutors in Washington had favored filing criminal charges against Officer Daniel Pantaleo, but ultimately Barr sided instead with other federal prosecutors based in Brooklyn who said the evidence wasn’t sufficient to make a case, a Justice Department official told The Associated Press.U.S. Attorney Richard Donoghue, of the Eastern District of New York, said in a news conference that while the death was tragic, there was insufficient evidence to prove that Pantaleo or any other officers willfully violated Garner’s civil rights.“Even if we could prove that Officer Pantaleo’s hold of Mr. Garner constituted unreasonable force, we would still have to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Officer Pantaleo acted willfully in violation of the law,” Donoghue said.Officers were attempting to arrest Garner on charges he sold loose, untaxed cigarettes outside a Staten Island convenience store in 2014. He refused to be handcuffed, and officers took him down. Garner is heard on bystander video crying out “I can’t breathe” at least 11 times before he falls unconscious. He later died.Police Chokehold Death Eric Garner (R) poses with his children during a family outing. (Family photo via National Action Network/AP Photo)A state grand jury had also refused to indict the officer on criminal charges.In the years since Garner’s death, the New York Police Department made a series of changes on how it relates to the communities it serves, abandoning a policy of putting rookie cops in higher-crime precincts in favor of a neighborhood policing model that revolves around community officers tasked with getting to know New Yorkers.Chokeholds are banned under police policy. Pantaleo maintained he used a legal takedown maneuver called the “seatbelt.”The medical examiner’s office said a chokehold contributed to Garner’s death.The New York Police Department brought Pantaleo up on departmental charges earlier this year. Federal prosecutors were observing the proceedings. An administrative judge has not ruled whether he violated policy. He could face dismissal, but Police Commissioner James O’Neill has the final say.In the years since the Garner death, Pantaleo has remained on the job but not in the field.By Michael Balsamo and Michael R. Sisak US News  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Share this articlecenter_img New York City police officer Daniel Pantaleo leaves his house in Staten Island, N.Y., on May 13, 2019. (Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AP Photo) Share Show Discussionlast_img read more

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The Canadian Press The Saskatchewan government is

first_imgThe Canadian PressThe Saskatchewan government is asking a judge to order an Indigenous protest camp to leave the legislature grounds.Government lawyer Michael Morris has told a Regina court that the protesters are making it hard for the province to maintain the land across from the building.Teepees have been set up for six months as campers protest what they say is racial injustice and the disproportionate number of Indigenous children apprehended by child-welfare workers.Protesters have filed a court application of their own seeking to have six arrests made during an eviction in June declared illegal.Lawyer Dan LeBlanc, who represents the protesters, told court his clients have a right to free speech.But Morris says it’s not about whether the protesters are advocating for a good cause but rather about them following the law, including bylaws that ban open fires and structures such as teepees on the property.“This case is not about whether the protesters are advocating for an honourable cause,” Morris told court Thursday. “It is not about whether there are too many Indigenous children in foster care. It is not about whether the criminal justice system is fair for Indigenous people.“This case is about the government’s ability to regulate, maintain land in Wascana Centre.”Protesters first set up a camp on Feb. 28 and were immediately told they had to leave, Morris said. They were given numerous trespassing notices and police moved in June 18 to dismantle the camp. Six people were arrested but never charged.The camp was set up again two days later and police have held off ever since. The government wants a judge to order police to intervene.Nine events have had to be relocated because of the camp, including part of the province’s Canada Day celebration.The camp has been a “potential flashpoint for confrontations between members of the public and the protesters,” added Morris, who pointed to the recent arrest of a man who allegedly discharged fireworks at the camp.LeBlanc told court Regina police Chief Evan Bray has already concluded the camp does not pose a safety risk. This case is about freedom of speech which is fundamental to a democracy, he said.“They are using a fundamental Canadian freedom,” he said. “The government bears the burden of convincing you that its infringement is justified.”People are allowed to use fires to barbecue hot dogs on the property but the government is taking issue with a sacred fire, he added.“The government is seeking to control and administer the park,” LeBlanc said. “The concern is primarily aesthetic.”Eric Adams, a constitutional law expert at the University of Alberta, has said the province would likely have to show legitimate safety concerns to persuade the court.In cases such as this one, he said the court will want to protect political expression as much as possible.“(But) even though you have a right to that expressive activity, a court is going to find that at some point, pretty early in the process, the government can limit that expressive right for a number of other valuable policy reasons,” Adams said.last_img read more

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FRIDAY Quiz Deserts

first_imgFRIDAY Quiz: Deserts January 22, 20164 Comments Blog / Quiz [WpProQuiz 6]center_img Every Friday, Secret Flying posts a cool quiz to test your travel knowledge.Today’s quiz is on DESERTS.Good luck!! After you’ve finished, let us know how you scored in the comments section below.last_img

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Housing Choice Act Takes Effect That Adds Protections Opportunity for Families Support

first_imgHousing Choice Act Takes Effect That Adds Protections, Opportunity for Families, Support for Landlords E-Headlines Tumblr Share. Google+ 0 By CBN Twittercenter_img A state law to promote affordable housing choices goes into complete effect this week.  House Bill 2639, the Housing Choice Act, which passed during the 2013 Legislative Session, created protections for Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher holders and established the Housing Choice Landlord Guarantee program. The bill was designed to increase opportunities for families struggling to make ends meet, while improving supports for participating landlords. Today, landlords are no longer able to deny a rental applicant solely on the basis that a Section 8 voucher is their source of income to pay for housing.  “Secure, stable housing is one of the most important tools for a family struggling to get ahead,” said Kotek. “The Housing Choice Act will help parents get the footing they need to find and keep a job, and give children the sense of continuity that helps them succeed at school.” The Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher program is a federal program designed to help struggling families and individuals find and afford housing on the private market. The program is administered by local housing authorities. The Housing Choice Act addresses problems with the program that led to discrimination against voucher holders and too few families able to find appropriate housing.  “Beginning today, Oregon is removing a major barrier to struggling families’ economic success,” said Sybil Hebb, Director of Policy Advocacy at the Oregon Law Center.   The law also provides improved financial assistance to participating landlords to mitigate unreimbursed damages caused by tenants.  Landlords may seek reimbursement for damages, if any, caused by a Section 8 tenant, up to a $5,000 cap. “This is the result of collaboration to improve the voucher program for everyone involved,” said Jim Straub, Legislative Director for the Oregon Rental Housing Association.  “Landlords should make sure they have the information needed to make the most of the new tools available to them.” “There are a number of new resources for landlords,” said Janet Byrd of Neighborhood Partnerships. “This law is a win-win for tenants and landlords.” Landlords requiring additional information on the Housing Choice Act should contact their local housing authority. Pinterest LinkedIn Email on July 3, 2014 Facebooklast_img read more

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Riff Cold Brewed Welcomes Andy Chapman as Head of Sales

first_img on January 30, 2018 Share. Pinterest By CBN Email Google+ Facebook Tumblrcenter_img Riff Cold Brewed Welcomes Andy Chapman as Head of Sales Twitter LinkedIn (Photo above courtesy of Riff Cold Brewed Coffee)Craft Beverage Veteran Tapped to Drive Launch Efforts Throughout Pacific NorthwestRiff Cold Brewed Coffee, a new craft beverage company founded by veterans from Crux Fermentation Project, Stumptown Coffee and LinkedIn, announced that it has hired Andy Chapman as Director of Sales to help expand its presence throughout the Pacific Northwest. Chapman is a seasoned sales executive in the craft beverage industry with 13-years experience introducing premium beverage brands to some of the most influential and respected grocery chains, bars, restaurants and public venues in Oregon.Before joining Riff, Andy held sales management positions at Columbia Distributing, the Pacific Northwest’s largest craft beer distributor, and Young’s Market, a family-owned beverage distributor of wines, spirits and select craft beverages spanning ten markets in the western United States. In his most recent role, Andy oversaw a 12-person team that was responsible for bringing some of the region’s premier craft beer brands such as Deschutes, Hopworks, Backwoods and Crux into some of Portland’s most popular craft beer destinations, including Urban Farmer and River Pig, while expanding presence in specialty grocery chains such as New Seasons, Market of Choice and Zupan’s.“We’re thrilled to bring Andy on to build our sales team and to launch Riff to the market,” says Steve Barham, Riff Co-Founder. “First and foremost, we were searching for a leader that exemplifies the core values that Riff was founded on— creating lasting relationships, a collaborative spirit that comes from building something great, being a positive force in the community, embracing innovation, and having fun with the people around you.” Barham continued, “We’re proud to have Andy join the team and look forward to having him continue his legacy of winning partnerships and trusted relationships within Oregon’s craft beverage industry.”“The cold brew coffee category is one of the most exciting things happening in the beverage industry today,” said Chapman, “With ready-to-drink coffee expected to reach $4.5 billion in annual sales by 2022, and millennial tastes shifting toward a cold brewed, all-natural coffee experience, I’m reminded of how the craft-beer category was poised for explosive growth a decade ago. I could not be more excited to join a team of exceptional industry minds that have developed a brand that embodies creativity, passion, experience and innovation.”RIFF COLD BREWED COFFEERiff is Paul Evers, co-founder of Crux Fermentation Project; Nate Armbrust, former head of product development and cold brew operations at Stumptown; Steve Barham, former senior director at LinkedIn; and Bobby Evers and Kevin Smyth, both with deep experience in craft beer branding and operations. And Riff is so much more— an enthusiastic and diverse tribe of investors, employees, partners, and you.When we riff on an idea, we start with a question: What if? What if we brewed coffee cold, for a sweeter, smoother flavor? What if we poured it on tap? Into a glass, not a mug? What if we met for coffee in the evening? With friends, and maybe—gasp—without wifi? What if it weren’t sacrilegious to drink our coffee decaffeinated, spiced, fruited, or even barrel fermented with wild yeast? Now we’re talking. Let’s Riff! For more information visit riffcoldbrewed.com or call 458-206-0825. E-Headlines 0last_img read more

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Land Board to Consider Land Use Applications Infrastructure Improvements for 945Acre Property

first_imgLand Board to Consider Land Use Applications, Infrastructure Improvements for 945-Acre Property in Deschutes County Google+ By CBN Share. 0 E-Headlines Facebook Tumblrcenter_img LinkedIn on August 9, 2018 Pinterest Twitter Email The State Land Board will be asked to approve next steps in the planning process for an approximately 945-acre state-owned property in Deschutes County during the August 14 Land Board meeting.The Department of State Lands (DSL) is requesting approval to:Submit land use planning applications to the City of Redmond and Deschutes County for the property, known as the South Redmond Tract. The applications are to expand the Redmond urban growth boundary, annex the property into the city, and apply the large lot industrial zoning designation.Partition two parcels from the property for a land exchange with Deschutes County and a land sale to the Oregon Military Department.Fund the infrastructure improvements necessary to meet City of Redmond requirements for community development and State of Oregon requirements for large lot industrial zoning.During the meeting DSL will also request Land Board approval to add an additional policy option package to the previously approved 2019-21 agency budget request. Additionally, an update on a Request for Information (RFI) for certified forest lands management will be presented.The meeting will be held:Tuesday, August 1410am to noonDepartment of State LandsLand Board Room775 Summer St. NE, SalemThis meeting will be held in a facility that is accessible for persons with disabilities.  If you need assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability, please notify Arin Smith at 503-986-5224 or arin.n.smith@state.or.us at least two working days prior to the meeting.To live stream the meeting, go to the State Lands YouTube channel:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQA7FHTWwl-gjJkQeYPJ1IAMeeting agenda: https://www.oregon.gov/dsl/Board/Pages/SLBmeetings.aspxAbout the State Land Board and the Department of State LandsThe State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Dennis Richardson and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.last_img read more

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What Should You Ask Your Interviewer at the End of a Data

first_img Share. LinkedIn on March 25, 2019 By CBN E-Headlines Facebook Asking pertinent questions about the company itself will indicate that you have thoroughly studied its work culture and are interested to find out more.It demonstrates your knowledge and expertise. Twitter When you ask questions about the future objectives and expectations that the employer has for the role, or inquire about the company’s work culture or management styles, it will help you analyze the vision and mission of the company.Questions for Recruiters at the End of a Data Science InterviewIf you’re preparing for a data science interview, start preparing your questions for the recruiters straight away.Here are some suggestions to help you formulate great questions:Can you tell me more about the company charter?Is this role focused on production engineering?What is the team structure for the role and how does this fit into the rest of the organization?Will I work with engineers or product managers?What is the measurement of success in this post? (If you’re interviewing for research or analytics roles, this question is essential for you.)Please tell me more about how the work process will be structured day to day.What type of code review system does the team currently use? (Code reviews are very important for a company’s culture as well as for knowledge sharing.)How does the team set its priorities?What types of tools and computer systems are used?Are there any opportunities for training and professional development?Are there any programs available to identify and train future leaders?Final ThoughtsNo interview should be a one-way conversation. It’s always important to answer the recruiters’ questions properly, but you should also show your enthusiasm about the work by asking well considered questions.Just make sure you don’t ask too many or irrelevant questions. Try to build a good and useful conversation. Let your recruiters see how keen you are to implement your knowledge. 0 Email Tumblr What Should You Ask Your Interviewer at the End of a Data Science Interview? Do you want a career as a data scientist?This is an industry that is growing fast, and a golden opportunity for you to show your talents and start earning big. However, this demand doesn’t mean that you won’t face competition.It goes without saying that you should prepare thoroughly for your data scientist interview. But you must also remember to prepare the correct questions to ask your interviewers at the end of the interview.Why Should You Ask the Interviewer Questions?Employers are looking for professionals who can provide maximum value to the company. Asking questions will show your enthusiasm for the role.Your interviewers are experienced professionals and can provide key insights into the role. Make the most of the opportunity to ask them questions. Here are some reasons why:You are showing that you are enthusiastic about the role and curious about the tasks associated with that role. An employee who is passionate about their work can provide great value to the company. Pinterest Google+ Asking questions is a crucial way to figure out whether the company is the right workplace for you or not.last_img read more

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