New members – May 2015

Find out who has joined the premier automotive trade association and what they get from membership. New members – May 2015Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)

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Contracts and Grants Considered By Emery County Commissioners

By Julie JohansenEmery County Commissioners discussed the pros and cons of a contract with Gold Cross for EMS services in the county during their meeting on Tuesday. Gold Cross is a private entity and the commissioners would need to ensure it was a quality unit. Commissioners decided to analyze the system they have now and the Gold Cross options. The item was tabled for further research.Next, Roxanne Jensen gave a presentation on the projects the county libraries have planned for National Library Week, which is slated for April 7-13. The presentation included an explanation of what libraries do for the public. These projects include plans for the LSTA Grant. A complete schedule of events at each library can be found below.Also during the meeting, the commission approved the planning sites for the Des-Bee-Dove kiosk on Des-Bee-Dove Road as long as there was coordination with Emery County Sheriff Greg Funk. Commissioners also approved a $250 donation to ETV News for the No Grave Goes Unadorned project for 2019. This project ensures that every grave in Carbon and Emery counties receives a flower for Memorial Day.Two Request for Qualifications packets on the Cottonwood Creek PL566 Watershed were received by the commissioners, one from Jones and DeMille Engineering and the other from Johansen and Tuttle Engineering. The packets passed on to be opened to see if they meet requirements. Commissioners also approved using Smith’s Tix to be their online ticket sales vendor for The Swell Country Fest this summer.Sheriff Funk reminded everyone during the meeting that rivers will be high and rapid this year. Search and Rescue members have been very busy and plan that that will continue to increase as the weather gets warmer. They expect well over 100 searches again this year and are considering putting some of the expenses back on those involved from outside the county.Emery County Attorney Mike Olsen reported that his new secretary is Samantha Johnson, asking all to welcome her.USU Extension agent Roe Zwahlen requested permission to use the flower beds on the southwest corner of the county administration building for the Jr. Master Gardeners program. The project received approval.Finally, the Emery County Travel Bureau received approval for matching grants from Transient Room Tax (TRT) monies for Millsite Ladies Golf, $1,000; Get In The Wild Adventures, $3,500; Green River Rock and Mineral Festival, $3,500; Tamarisk Restaurant, $3,500; and MECCA Bike Club for its Spring Bike Festival in Green River, $3,500. read more

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Employees students and research add up to Brocks significant impact on Niagara

Nearly half a billion dollars. Even on the conservative end of the measurement scale, that’s the economic impact Brock University has on the Niagara region each year.It comes in the form of Brock’s 19,000 students living in the region and spending their money here. It comes from hundreds of millions of dollars in capital and operational expenditures. And it comes from Brock’s 4,800 part- and full-time employees receiving more than $200 million in payroll each year.“I encourage you to look beyond the numbers,” said Brock University President Gervan Fearon. “There are individuals directly tied to each of those dollar values. The values reflect the outstanding work our staff, faculty, researchers, students and partners are doing in contributing to economic and community activities across the region and province.”A new policy brief released by the Niagara Community Observatory (NCO) Wednesday, Oct. 10 gives an updated snapshot of the University’s economic impact locally and beyond. The brief is a pilot project that will lead to more wholesome economic impact studies, as well as research examining Brock’s social and community engagement impact.“One of the things this paper does is show how the University can be a catalyst and a partner in Niagara,” Fearon said. “Brock is a community-based university and what we’re celebrating here is not just our achievements, but the achievements of the entire community.”Brock Associate Professor of Geography and Tourism Studies Jeff Boggs and master’s student Lauren Peddle (BA ’18) co-authored the report after spending months researching and poring through data using two separate accepted methodologies.Using conservative assumptions as the basis, one method estimates Brock’s impact in Niagara to be more than $436 million and the other more than $450 million. When student and related spending are considered, this number jumps to nearly $640 million.Brock has an annual operating budget of $320 million and a payroll of more than $212 million. It’s one of Niagara’s biggest employers, and nearly 80 per cent of its employees live in the region.Brock Vice-President, Research Tim Kenyon said measuring and characterizing a post-secondary institution’s impact on its community is a “ferociously difficult challenge.” But Brock’s decision to take it on shows the University’s commitment to being a community partner.“What we learned is that the University affects the community, but the community also affects the University,” he said.He added that Brock’s more than $15 million in research grants received in the past year translates into equipment purchases, new hires and the enabling of research that positively impacts the community.The policy brief will become a foundation for future research and planning, said Fearon.“We’ll now be able to look at the numbers to say ‘how can we have the greatest financial impact at a regional level?’”Deputy St. Catharines CAO David Oakes, one of the panelists at Wednesday’s NCO event, said Brock’s impact on municipalities in the region is immense.“Brock is critical to the St. Catharines economy,” he said. “You look at something like the Steel Blade hockey game, where you have 5,000 students coming downtown — that has a direct impact on the downtown core that wouldn’t have been there otherwise.”Other panelists reflecting on the important role played by the University and the value added to Niagara communities included Mishka Balsom from the Greater Niagara Chamber of Commerce, Rino Mostacci from the Niagara Region and Peter Tiidus, Dean of Brock’s Faculty of Applied Health Sciences. read more

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Jets Darnold fully practices on track to start vs Bills

FLORHAM PARK, N.J. — Sam Darnold was a full participant at practice, putting him on track to start for the New York Jets at Buffalo against the Bills on Sunday.The rookie quarterback has missed the past three games with a strained right foot. Coach Todd Bowles says Wednesday that it’s too early in the week to say for sure if Darnold will start.Darnold was injured against Miami on Nov. 4 and hasn’t played since. He returned to practice on a limited basis last week, but was not active as Josh McCown started in his place for the third time. Bowles said the No. 3 overall pick was working on shaking off the rust by getting his timing right.McCown had one touchdown pass and four interceptions filling in for Darnold, and the Jets went 0-3 in those games.Darnold still leads the NFL with 14 interceptions despite missing three games. He will try to jumpstart an offence that has struggled during New York’s six-game losing streak.___More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFLDennis Waszak Jr., The Associated Press read more

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Opinion 5 things to watch for during the Buckeye bye week

Coach Urban Meyer looks on during a game against Maryland on Oct. 4 in College Park, Md. OSU won, 52-24.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorFollowing games against Cincinnati and Maryland in which the Buckeyes combined for more than 1,200 yards, they are facing what could be their biggest opponent yet: another bye week.After seeming to hit their stride both offensively and defensively, the Buckeyes will be left watching from the couch Saturday for the second time in a month.But even though OSU will not take the field this week, I compiled a list of things you should look for around the college football landscape. 1. Could this week be the most exciting week in 2014 for college football?During the Buckeye bye week, there are five matchups scheduled that will pit ranked opponents against each other, with two of those games involving top-five teams. Those matchups feature No. 5 Baylor against No. 9 Texas Christian and No. 2 Auburn against No. 3 Mississippi State. Both games are battles of unbeaten teams and will no doubt make or break each team’s season, as well as their dreams of making it into the first ever College Football Playoff. So if the Buckeyes get bored just sitting around, all they will have to do is flip on the TV and enjoy. 2. Can OSU’s rival Michigan get out of its current rut?Ever since the fallout from the Shane Morris incident in which the sophomore quarterback was put back into a game after seemingly suffering a concussion, Michigan has not looked in more of a state of disarray since the Rich Rodriguez era. Rodriguez was ousted from Michigan after just three seasons in which the Wolverines made just one bowl appearance.  After the team’s loss to Rutgers in its last game, Ann Arbor, Mich., is ready to implode. All is not lost for the Maize and Blue, however. The Wolverines are scheduled to take on the Penn State Nittany Lions Saturday at home under the lights. If there is anything that can give a program hope for the future, it’s a win during a night game at home (see: OSU vs. Wisconsin in 2011).The Nittany Lions are coming off a bye week, one that came a week after they were embarrassed at home by Northwestern, 29-6. If there was ever a time for Michigan to turn around its season, this weekend’s game is the opportunity it has been waiting for. 3. Will a team emerge as the country’s clear No. 1?Going into its seventh week, the college football season has yet to provide us with a clear, dominant team, despite what the polls may have us believe. The defending national champion Florida State Seminoles are still undefeated and remain atop most polls, however they have not impressed like they did a year ago.Just last week, it took the Seminoles nearly a full half of football to start scoring against the lowly Wake Forest Demon Deacons before pulling away late to win, 43-3. In addition, the Seminoles have played just one ranked team on the season, and are currently set to play just one more ranked foe for the remainder of the season against Notre Dame. With that said, this leaves the door open for teams like Mississippi State, Ole Miss, Baylor and many others to make their mark on the college football world.4. The Big Ten as a whole is a must-miss this week.Aside from the Michigan-Penn State matchup, you might want to stay away from watching Big Ten football this weekend.With OSU on an off week, the only ranked Big Ten team in action, No. 8 Michigan State, is set to take on conference bottom-dweller Purdue.Not exactly the most riveting game. However, if matchups such as Northwestern against Minnesota or Indiana against Iowa pique your interest, I encourage you to tune in (at your own risk). 5. Will two early bye weeks end up hurting the Buckeyes in the long run?How could they not?Any time two bye weeks are scheduled within a month, it could very well lead to players, and even coaches, becoming lackadaisical.While OSU coach Urban Meyer said he will not allow this to happen, one has to wonder what the Buckeyes’ mindset will be like going into their Oct. 18 matchup with Rutgers.And even if they come out firing on all cylinders and bring down the Scarlet Knights, a straight stretch of games from Oct. 18 through Nov. 29 could mean players missing time because of injury. Injuries are part of the game, there is no denying that, but not having time to heal from these injuries could prove crucial for the Buckeyes.We will find out as the season presses on.OSU’s matchup with Rutgers is set to kickoff at 3:30 p.m. on Oct. 18 at Ohio Stadium. read more

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Joey Bosa cements doubleovertime win for Buckeyes against Penn State

Coach Urban Meyer (left) leads the Buckeyes out of the tunnel at Beaver Stadium for an Oct. 25 game against Penn State in State College, Pa. OSU won in double-overtime, 31-24. Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editor Sophomore defensive lineman Joey Bosa (right) hugs senior defensive lineman Michael Bennett following a 31-24 double-overtime victory over Penn State in State College, Pa. Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorSTATE COLLEGE, Pa. — The No. 13 Ohio State football team jumped out to an early lead, but relied on a late defensive stand in a 31-24 double-overtime victory against Penn State.OSU (6-1, 3-0) sophomore defensive lineman Joey Bosa knocked down Penn State (4-3, 1-3) sophomore quarterback Christian Hackenberg on fourth-and-five in the second overtime to seal the win Saturday night at Beaver Stadium.“I think we learned that we are a real team, and when adversity strikes we can come together and win a big game in a crazy environment,” Bosa said after the game.After the Buckeyes outscored the Nittany Lions 17-0 in the first half, Penn State reversed field in the second half to tie the game at 17 with nine seconds on the clock to force overtime.OSU coach Urban Meyer saved praise for his team’s opponent after the game, and added that the Buckeyes need to improve their play along the line.“A credit to our opponent, they played their tails off,” Meyer said. “Outplayed us up front, I think. (I’m) a little upset with the way we played up front and we got to get that fixed.”Penn State got the ball first before Hackenberg led the Nittany Lions to a first-and-goal from the two-yard line. The Buckeyes held on to force third down at the one, but senior running back Bill Belton found his way into the end zone to give Penn State its first lead of the night.On the Buckeyes’ first overtime possession, redshirt-freshman quarterback J.T. Barrett kept the ball on a second-and-seven to set up first and goal from the five with a 17-yard run. He kept it again on the next play, scoring a touchdown to tie the game at 24.Due to a personal foul penalty against Penn State following the Buckeyes’ extra point, OSU started the second overtime at the 12-yard line. Barrett led the Buckeyes to a third-and-two at the four-yard line, before taking another quarterback keeper into the end zone to put OSU back on top, 31-24.After the game, Barrett said he was trying to take it one play at a time and didn’t necessarily plan on running the ball before his two overtime touchdowns.“Just reading it each time, because when you go out there with an idea you play the idea and then you’re wrong,” he said.Penn State took over at the 25-yard line, but the Buckeyes forced fourth-down–and-five at the 20. Hackenberg was knocked to the ground as Bosa overpowered a Nittany Lion blocker.The Fort Lauderdale, Fla., native said he didn’t follow his assignment on the play, despite the positive result for OSU.“That wasn’t what I was supposed to do,” Bosa said. “I was supposed to hit the guard and wrap out, but he blocked down so the hole opened up. So I just took it and I was tired of trying to work my way around the back so I just ran over him.”Bosa added he didn’t even realize what had happened until his teammates surrounded him after the play.“I was so tired, I didn’t even know it was a sack until everybody started yelling,” he said. “I looked over and he had the ball and (junior defensive lineman Adolphus Washington) came to hug me and I just fell down and everybody jumped on top of me.”Bosa — who said he “needed to play a lot better” — finished the game with 2.5 sacks and six total tackles.Barrett said he was simply glad Bosa was wearing a white jersey rather than Penn State’s blue shirt in the game.“Joey Bosa, one thing I can say, I’m really glad he’s on our team,” he said. “That’s for sure. Great player.”The play sealed OSU’s third straight win against the Nittany Lions.The double-overtime finish came after Penn State picked up a late field goal on a drive that began inside its own 10-yard line.Holding on to its three-point advantage, OSU sophomore punter Cameron Johnston pinned the Nittany Lions at their own nine-yard line with 2:58 to play in the game, then drove down the field to tack on three points and tie the game.Hackenberg led the Nittany Lions to the OSU 43-yard line before being sacked by Bosa on first down. A penalty against the Buckeyes on the next play gave Penn State a new set of downs on the OSU 28, needing just a field goal to force overtime.On third-and-six at the OSU 14 yard-line with 19 seconds on the clock Hackenberg threw incomplete into the end zone, forcing a field goal attempt for the Nittany Lions.After an OSU timeout, Penn State senior kicker Sam Ficken connected on a 31-yard field goal.The Nittany Lions’ race back into the game was led in part by their defense’s ability to disrupt the OSU passing game.Barrett threw an interception on the third play of the second half, which was returned 40 yards for a touchdown by senior defensive lineman Anthony Zettel. The pick was Barrett’s first interception since the Buckeyes Sept. 13 win against Kent State.But after that touchdown, neither team found its way back onto the scoreboard in the third quarter.Barrett threw another interception on OSU’s first play of the fourth quarter, and the Penn State offense managed to break through on the next drive.“The last one, that was a dumb mistake,” Barrett said of the interception. “I saw the Mike (linebacker) and I tried to throw over him.”Meyer said Barrett sprained his knee during the game, but kept on playing through the pain.“J.T. Barrett had a sprained knee, and continued to do what he did and even on the drop back passes, whether it was a coverage sack or pressured, he pulled through a couple plays and made some great plays for us,” he said.After the pick, Hackenberg hit freshman wide receiver Saeed Blacknall for a 24-yard touchdown, moving the Nittany Lions within three points.Penn State forced OSU to punt on the next drive, but senior wide receiver Devin Smith downed it at the one-yard line. The Nittany Lions were forced to punt, giving the ball back to OSU with 51 yards between it and the end zone, and 5:17 remaining on the clock.The drive stalled, giving the Nittany Lions their shot, leading to Ficken’s field goal and the eventual overtime.Sophomore running back Ezekiel Elliott paced the Buckeyes’ offense with 26 carries for 109 yards and a touchdown, while Barrett added 20 carries for 75 yards and his two overtime scores. The OSU signal caller also finished the game 12-for-19 for 74 yards with one touchdown and two interceptions. Senior tight end Jeff Heuerman led the Buckeyes with three receptions for 19 yards and a score.After Bosa’s 2.5 sacks, redshirt-freshman linebacker Darron Lee added 1.5 sacks of his own while junior linebacker Joshua Perry tallied a team-high 18 total tackles.The Buckeyes are scheduled to return to the field Nov. 1 to take on Illinois at Ohio Stadium. Kickoff is set for 8 p.m. read more

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Ohio State mens golf finishes tied for last place in Carmel Cup

Redshirt-junior Michael Bernard rolls a putt towards the hole during one of OSU’s matches in 2014. Credit: Courtesy of OSU AthleticsOhio State men’s golf returned from the West Coast after an underwhelming outing at the season-opening Carmel Cup tournament. Hosted by the Vanderbilt Commodores at the Pebble Beach Golf Links in Pebble Beach, California, the Buckeyes teed-off against eight teams, including four ranked in the top-20 at the 54-hole tournament. While navigating one of the premier golf courses in the nation, the Buckeyes, under the leadership of new coach Jay Moseley for the first time, tied for last place with the Arkansas Razorbacks, finishing with a total score of 1107 (+27) at the three-day event. The Buckeyes placed sixth after the first round with a total score of 372 (+12) before finishing seventh in the final two days. Junior Clark Engle and redshirt senior Grant Weaver entered the clubhouse with four birdies, four bogeys and a double bogey on their card. Freshman Will Grimmer played solid for his collegiate debut, carding two birdies and three. The team’s total score was comprised of the top five scores out of its six-man lineup. The five scores that counted for the Scarlet and Gray were Grimmer’s 217 (+1), Engle’s 218 (+2), Sean Busch’s 223 (+7), Weaver’s 228 (+12) and Josh Wick’s 229 (+13), excluding freshman Tee-k Kelly’s score of 234 (+18). Engle, along with Grimmer, shined throughout the tournament. By the final day, Engle, who tied for 16th, recorded 14 birdies — second-most of the tournament — including six in the final round. Engle was one of 10 players who carded an 18 hole score of 69. Grimmer made the most of his debut.During the second round of his first collegiate tournament, he churned in a 4-under 68, which was the lowest round for any player during the three days of competition. He entered the final day in contention for the individual title, as he was only two shots off the lead. Grimmer was unable to capture the individual crown after shooting a 4-over par 76 during the final round. However, the freshman still finished the tournament in a tie for 10th place.The Buckeyes now turn their focus to the Inverness Intercollegiate, which is set to take place on Sept. 21 at Inverness Country Club in Toledo. read more

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New Ohio State pistol coach Emil Milev shoots for the next level

Emil Meliv, now Ohio State’s pistol coach, takes aim at the International Shooting Sport Federation World Cup at Fort Benning in Georgia on March 28, 2014. Credit: Courtesy of USA ShootingAfter competing in six Olympic games, Emil Milev has a new challenge ahead of him: being head coach of the Ohio State pistol team as it prepares for another triumphant season.The pistol team won last year’s women’s aggregate national championships and the open team intercollegiate championship for the third season in a row. Milev said he is looking forward to building on the success of an already highly decorated program and “taking it to the next level.”“The name is what led me here — it’s the best in the country,” Milev said. “I think the team and I can work together, and this collaboration can be beneficial to the program. I want to give them a lot of opportunities in the sport and in life.” The Bulgarian-born Milev competed for his home country in four Olympic games between 1992 and 2004 and earned the silver medal in the 1996 Atlanta games, before moving to the U.S. in 2004 and becoming a U.S. citizen in 2009. He competed for the U.S. in the 2012 London and 2016 Rio games. Milev also is a six-time World Championship competitor, earning the silver medal in 1994. Milev began the sport of pistol as a hobby, going with friends to the shooting range. He began intercollegiate competition, eventually working toward qualifying for the World Championship and Olympics.“I felt hungry for the competitiveness, and started practicing harder, reading books and learning more about the sport,” Milev said. “Never in high school did I think I would be at six Olympic games and even receiving a medal. I just love it so much. I never dreamed it would be my life, but it slowly turned out to be that way. It’s very rewarding.”A main goal of Milev’s is to have the program focus more to the Olympic-styled events he knows best.“The [National Rifle Association] is making a few changes in their competitive events, but right now only three collegiate events pistol shooters participate in are Olympic,” Milev said. “I would like to see the program go in this direction, and eventually see athletes coming here to contribute to our team along with our athletes competing and winning in international matches in the years to come.”Pistol has multiple events in the men’s and women’s divisions, depending on the size of the gun used and the distance from the target. The type of competitions also vary in how fast the shooter must get the shots off. Most of the sport, as described by Milev, is a balance between controlling the fine-tuned machine to work with the shooter and the mental focus needed to be successful.“To truly appreciate pistol, you have to try it,” Milev said. “Even just learning more about it, asking our athletes about what they do and how they must train, people will understand this is truly a sport.”Sophomore Anthony McCollum, who earned the silver medal in last year’s national open-air competition, said Milev has already made an impact on the Buckeyes, though he was hired less than three weeks ago. The team competes on October 27-28 at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado, where it will face Army, Coast Guard, North Dakota State and Utah to begin the season. “We ask for the Ohio State community to celebrate with us, there’s a lot of talent on this team and you can expect lots of wins this year,” Milev said. read more

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Brandon Jacobs Not Happy With Meager Role In San

Brandon Jacobs, a major cog at running back the Super Bowl champion New York Giants last year,  has not had a single carry for his new team, San Francisco 49ers. And he is not happy about it.“How many times have you seen me [on the field] this year?” Jacobs asked rhetorically in USA Today.Jacobs was asked how he felt about the rematch of the NFC Championship game this week between his old team and current team.“It would be different if things were different, put it that way,” Jacobs said. “I don’t have any thoughts on it.”Jacobs, 30, signed with 49ers after being released by the Giants in the spring over a contract dispute.  There was a gap of roughly $500,000 and the Giants attempted to slash his $4.4 million base salary by more than half.Jacobs signed with the 49ers during the summer under the assumption that he would have an active role in the offense, but it has been the complete opposite. And it might not change. Consider that last week, the 49ers set a franchise record with 621 yards of offense with Jacobs watching from the bench. Frustrating for Jacobs?“Oh, very. Because I don’t know anything. I don’t know what’s what,” he said. “But I’m hanging in there, I’m working every day, doing what I have to do. Let’s say I’m just working and doing what I have to do and that’s that.Jacobs claimed he was ready to play last week against the Buffalo Bills, even though the team decided to hold him out.  Jacobs said he is healthy.“I feel great.  I feel phenomenal. My legs are as fresh as yours,” he told reporters. “I’ve learned over the years when you open your mouth and say certain things, it hurts you, so I’m just going to shut up and keep working.”And what if he does not play against his old team?“”It would disappoint me a lot,” he said.  “But like I said, it’s not my call.”During his seven year career with the Giants, Jacobs rushed for 4,849 yards and 56 touchdowns. Jacobs could be released soon and free to sign with another team. read more

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Russell Wilsons Blackness Should Not Be a Question

It’s troubling to hear reverberations from the Super Bowl-champion Seattle Seahawks’ locker room that quarterback Russell Wilson is at the center of a divide within the team because he’s not “Black enough.”Really? Seriously?Being Black has no boundaries, and if some of his teammates take his insistence on not blasting rap music or not wearing his pants hanging off his butt or enunciating when he speaks or whatever else they conjure up as not being “Black enough,” well, that’s a case of us setting ourselves back.Percy Harvin, a talented yet apparently volatile receiver, was traded last week to the New York Jets in a move that stunned most NFL observers. The talk from the Seahawks’ locker room (anonymously, of course) was that there was a rift between quarterback and receiver. Half the players sided with Harvin and others with Wilson. In the end, the team rolled with its quarterback who led them to the championship last year and traded Harvin and all his talent.Last year, Black people went berserk when a white journalist said Colin Kaepernick was not fit to lead the San Francisco 49ers as quarterback because his body is laden with tattoos. But hardly is there a whimper from the Black community when Black teammates criticize their quarterback for being a polished young man. Something is wrong with that.Wilson, in a weak press conference to try to diffuse the drama, said that Harvin is a lot like him and that the discord between the two and teammates was a media creation. Not true on both counts. This is what he said: “Percy and I never had differences. He’s a guy that, you know, we had a lot of similarities, probably, if anything. You know, guys that want to compete at the highest level, want to win every single time you step on the field. Want the ball in our hands, to make the big play and everything. So I’m not sure why the media tries to blow everything out of proportion, it’s part of it, I guess. You have to deal with it. But you also ignore it, too. Like I always tell you guys, ignore the noise. You know, Percy’s a Virginia guy and I wish nothing but the best for him.”About all Harvin and Wilson have in common is that they are both from Virginia and they play football.  And they are Black. That’s about it. And that’s more than enough. Neither is more or less Black than the other.Being Black means being hip and corny, smart and not-so-smart, giving and greedy, thoughtful and selfish, articulate and mumbling, soulful and soulless, tough and weak, ambitious and docile … and on and on. When Black men call other Black men “not Black enough,” they point out the insecurities within themselves.No doubt, if Seattle, which was predicted by some pundits to go undefeated this season, had not lost two games in a row, the tension within the team would be minimized. But adversity (losing) brings out the soul of a person and a team, and the Seahawks have to undergo serious self-examination now to hold it together.Wilson, by most accounts, comports himself with respect, conveys his thoughts clearly, treats people with respect, works hard, leads by example. Seems “Black enough” to me. read more

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