Welsh wonder wing George North

first_imgWould you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit Wales are considering moving North to centre in the futureGiven what he’s already achieved on the world stage, it’s easy to forget just how young George North is, writes Features Editor – Sarah Mockford. One reporter fell into this trap at the World Cup, asking the Wales wing what he remembered about the inaugural tournament in 1987 when the men in red registered a third-place finish. It was left to North to point out that he wasn’t born in 1987. Nor was he around for RWC 1991, while South Africa in 1995 is unlikely to have pierced his three-year-old consciousness.North is poised to have more caps than birthday parties come the end of the RBS 6 Nations. His 15th Test match was the World Cup bronze-medal final defeat by Australia at Eden Park and his clinical finishing – he crossed nine times in his first 12 Tests, including braces against South Africa and England – has seen him tipped to break Wales’ try-scoring record by the holder himself, Shane Williams. But North is still only 19 years of age and won’t leave his teenage years behind until April.Speaking to North it’s easy to see why his age can slip from people’s minds. He’s far from a surly teenager; he’s mature and holds his end of a conversation with ease. There’s a confidence about him but no sense of arrogance. Like many young achievers, he’s tired of being characterised by his age and would prefer to be recognised simply for his achievements. When it comes to the constant reference to his youth, North admits: “Sometimes it gets annoying; it’s not something to use as an excuse. When I’m in the rugby environment I don’t feel like a 19-year-old, I’m just one of the guys. Some of them might be a lot older than me, but I train, live and work with them. On the pitch I have a job to do and I want to hold my own.”North jokes that the age gap with older players is only obvious when it comes to musical tastes. Stephen Jones, 34 this month, is still struggling to get to grips with drum and bass apparently.It’s only a year since North scored two tries against South Africa on his Test debut in Cardiff, earning praise from Bryan Habana. His career has been on an upward trajectory ever since and shows no sign of stopping any time soon. He admits that 12 months ago he would never have contemplated playing in a World Cup and becoming a Wales regular, saying: “It’s been one hell of a year.”But while the autograph hunters have been out in greater numbers since his return from New Zealand, his Scarlets team-mates won’t let him get beyond his station. “I get a bit of stick being the young one but I give it back as well!” he laughs.North himself isn’t one to rest on his laurels and realises that there is still more he can add to his game. The past year has shown him what is required of a world-class winger and while he already has many of those attributes – pace, power, footwork – he knows he must broaden his skill-set.“I’ve learned little things about the trade that I want to take forward and use to improve my game,” he says. “I’ve taken a lot of confidence from the World Cup and think I put in some decent performances, but I’ve got more to prove and there’s more to come from me.“Something that came out of the World Cup is that the back three have a massive work-rate. I’m looking to improve on that in my game. I want to be more involved, get my hands on the ball more and be a pain in the arse wherever I am. I want to be a threat everyone has to deal with.“I’m loving the game and every second I’m on the park my enthusiasm is coming through; I just want to be everywhere. I’ve learned a lot from Shane Williams and Leigh Halfpenny; they’re so consistent and their work-rate is phenomenal. Players around the world like Cory Jane and Bryan Habana have a fantastic work-rate too. It’s a trait the modern winger has to have – to work hard for the whole game.”In fairness to North, his work-rate is already pretty high. Let’s take a few examples. He was a constant threat to the Fiji defence at the World Cup, breaking left, right and centre to score one try, play a crucial role in three others and pick up the Man of the Match award. In the third-place play-off against Australia, he was still giving his all in the closing minutes as Wales chased nothing but a consolation try – and he did this with blood streaming down his face from a head wound. He is just as dangerous in regional colours, proving the star performer on his Heineken Cup debut, continually crashing through defenders and setting up Ben Morgan’s try in the Scarlets’ win over Castres.North has put in plenty of work on the mental side of the game too. He has formed a strong relationship with Wales’ mental skills coach Andy McCann, of whom Sam Warburton is also fulsome in his praise, to ensure he’s in the right state of mind before matches and doesn’t become overawed by where he finds himself in world rugby. After all, there’s no point having all the physical skills if your head isn’t in the right place.“Being the youngest in the squad and not having as much experience as others, I’ve relied a lot on Andy to calm me down and help me chill out. He’s a great guy and has done a lot for me. He’s given me the confidence to back myself and not go into my shell.“I’ve met him for coffee since we’ve been back and we keep in touch. He works with a lot of the boys and what he does is different for each player. When I’ve been injured he’s good at helping me build my confidence back up. Every morning before a game I ring him too – it’s good just to hear a friendly voice. He’ll just give me little things to remember on the pitch and key points to focus on throughout the game. I’ve done a lot of work with him and I thank him a lot.”center_img North celebrating making the RWC semis with WarburtonNorth is hoping Wales will also be thankful for their World Cup campaign as a whole when it comes to the Six Nations. While the tournament ended in disappointment with defeats by France and Australia, they still went further than any other home nation and impressed people the world over with their style of play. Only New Zealand and Australia scored more tries than Wales in the pool stages while in seven matches they conceded only seven tries, proving that both their offensive and defensive games are in good shape. Now they head into the championship with a tight-knit young squad full of confidence.“We have a great chance in the Six Nations if we come together on the day. There are bits to improve on but they’re little one per centers rather than massive things. We just need to carry the momentum from the World Cup forward. The Wales squad is all performance-based so I know if I’m not performing at the right level I won’t get in.“We worked so hard that it was horrible to finish on a low note at the World Cup. One kick or one missed tackle can make a massive difference. But we can take a lot from that experience and push forward. We’re very close as a squad and when crap happens we come together and pull through as a squad. We work hard for each other and give everything we’ve got.”Wales are also sure to benefit from the fact that many of those to impress in New Zealand are developing their playing relationships further at the Scarlets. Nigel Davies has backed Welsh youth for several seasons now and that policy is paying off with seven Scarlets in Wales’ World Cup squad, equal with the Ospreys and more than Cardiff Blues’ contingent. North says playing with the likes of Rhys Priestland, Jonathan Davies and Scott Williams week in, week out can only help his own and Wales’ game.“I’m enjoying playing with the boys again and it’s nice to be back in the groove. The more we play together, the more comfortable we are with each other and the more we can understand each other’s games.”With time on the side of a youthful Wales squad, the big question is: just how good can this team be? “It could be awesome,” says North. “We’re playing with confidence, there are a lot of young boys coming through and the potential here is awesome. It’s something I’m excited to be part of.”Check North scoring two tries on his debut for Wales v South Africa…This article appeared in the January 2012 issue of Rugby World Magazine. Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad.last_img read more

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New Zealand Win Sevens Rugby World Cup in San Francisco

first_imgThe women beat Mexico, Ireland, the United States and finally France by 29 points to nil. This was also their second World Cup trophy in a row after defeating Canada in 2013.In an interview after the match, co-captain Tim Mikkelson said; “We knew coming in it was going to be tough. We nearly got knocked out by France but raised it against Fiji. Credit to the coaching staff and the coach who brought the boys together. Both men and women train in the same place and they put pressure on us by winning their final. Credit to England who played amazing this weekend and we’re humbled to get the victory.”Rugby World’s Sevens World Cup coverage in association with Tudor Watch.Follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter. Champs: New Zealand beat England in the men’s final (Getty Images) England men’s captain said he is “not totally sold on the new format. There are pros and cons to it but it’s up to World Rugby to keep mixing things up and keep improving the game.”New Zealand coach Clark Laidlaw also said “As a spectacle I’m sure everyone enjoyed it, but when you’ve got coaches and players’ livelihoods at stake, and the format isn’t quite what we’re paid to do, it’s an interesting question.”Back to back: New Zealand women perform a haha after their victory (Getty Images)Laidlaw’s criticism is surprising given the success of both the New Zealand men’s and women’s teams.The men beat Russia, France, Fiji, and in the final, England to secure their second World Cup victory in a row. The final score was 33-12. In 2013 New Zealand once again beat England in the final. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img New Zealand Win Sevens Rugby World Cup in San FranciscoIn both the mens and women’s Rugby Sevens World Cup, New Zealand emerged victorious showing their dominance on the world stage once again. Held in San Francisco, over 102,000 fans attended the event over the three days and they were entertained with some exhilarating sevens rugby.There was also a new format introduced for the 2018 tournament, with the traditional round-robin phase scrapped for a straight knockout in the opening round of matches.Whilst it created incredible excitement from the off, this new format divided opinion.“We’re getting a lot of positive feedback from fans about the drama of knockout,” said World Rugby chief executive Brett Gosper. “It makes each game exciting. It can be brutal for teams, but sport’s brutal.” Using a new knockout stage system, New Zealand won the 2018 Sevens World Cup in San Francisco. last_img read more

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What Rugby World Cup fans can expect in Central Japan

first_img TAGS: Japan Find out about the fanzones around Toyota and Shizuoka as well as other attractions in the area LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 27 October 3-8pm, Semi-final2 November 3-8.30pm, FinalShizuoka Prefecture plans to set up Omotenashi Areas – multiple-event zones – between the Shizuoka Stadium Ecopa and nearby railway station, Aino, on match days. Those zones will be lined with rows of stalls offering local specialties such as Fujinomiya Yakisoba (noodles fried with vegetables and pork crackling), as well as a variety of local products including green tea.Action stations: Japan will play matches in Toyota and Shizuoka (Jiji Press)There will also be live shows of traditional Japanese music before the matches, as well as fireworks after them to celebrate the efforts made by both teams.Here are the Shizuoka Omotenashi Areas opening hours…28 September 11am-9.30pm4 October 1.30-9.50pm9 October 11am-9pm11 October 2-9.50pmHow to get thereThe Shinkansen is a simpler and smarter way to travel between Tokyo and the Central Japan area. It only takes one hour and half to reach Nagoya from Tokyo by bullet train, without the hassle of a security check, while enjoying a magnificent view of Mount Fuji from a seat on the right-hand side of the car. JR-Central offers a free app to book and manage your Shinkansen ticket, handy for securing the best seat.What to seeUkai, or cormorant fishing, is a traditional business dating back more than 1300 years and is similar in nature to falconry. The fisher, in a traditional dark attire with water-repellent straw skirt, controls as many as 12 cormorants.Go fish: Cormorant master Shuji Sugiyama in Gifu (Getty Images)When the fisher calls the birds back, they discharge their catch of sweetfish, which is prized among the Japanese. A loosely-attached collar made from hemp keeps the larger fish in the cormorant’s throat pouch and allows the smaller ones to be swallowed as their reward.A strong bond between the fisher and each of the birds is vital for successful fishing. A Ukai master would describe their cormorants as partners or family; so strong is the bond that the fisher keeps retired birds until they live out their lives.This traditional way of fishing used to be popular throughout Japan, but now it has become a rarity. The two rivers in Central Japan, Nagara River in Gifu and Kiso River in Aichi, are the rare places where one may see the most impressive performances of cormorant fishing.What to eatSweet, tender, juicy, melt-in-the-mouth… no written words are enough to explain the supreme taste of Wagyu, the Japanese super-beef. While Kobe beef has pioneered the export of Japanese beef and is probably the most well-known brand of Wagyu, the Central Japan area offers three prominent Wagyu brands that parallel Kobe in quality – Matsusaka, Omi and Hida.Good cut: Wagyu beef from Hida cattle (Getty Images)The secret of Wagyu lies in its fat. The Wagyu meat contains lots of unsaturated fat with a very low melting point, some as low as 13°C, which is less than half as low as regular beef. This fat does not come as white streaks running through the meat, but is evenly distributed, like the pattern of marble. The result is a meat that literally dissolves and releases its rich flavor in the mouth.Matsusaka beef comes from Mie Prefecture, Omi beef from Shiga Prefecture, and Hida beef from Gifu Prefecture. Try it as a steak, sukiyaki or shabushabu – it will be bliss on the tastebuds.What to doAsaichi, the morning market, has long been a feature of rural Japan. While most of them have not survived to this date, two of the remaining few are held in the Central Japan area.One of them is in Wajima, Ishikawa Prefecture. It is open 8am to noon every day bar the second and fourth Wednesday every month. With 200 stalls packed into a 360-metre stretch of the street, it is regarded as the best morning market in Japan.Since Wajima is a fishing port, seafood can be found at virtually every stall. You can buy fresh fish just off the boat and have it made into mouthwatering sashimi, or get a steamed abalone sliced up to go for later enjoyment. Advertising FeatureWhat Rugby World Cup fans can expect in Central JapanWith a week to go before the Rugby World Cup kicks off, two stadiums in the Central Japan area are awaiting fans from all over the world.The City of Toyota Stadium in Aichi Prefecture is known for its steep and elevated stands, from which fans can command a close and unhindered view of the action below. It is regarded by many as one of the best stadiums to host RWC 2019 matches.In Shizuoka Prefecture, the Shizuoka Stadium Ecopa sits on a hill, and this location has an added bonus: of the 12 World Cup venues, it is the only one from which Mount Fuji can be seen at close range. Supporters can take a short walk to a viewpoint that offers magnificent scenery of the highest mountain in Japan.What a view: Shizuoka Stadium Ecopa with Mount Fuji in the backgroundHere are the matches being played at these venues…23 September Wales v Georgia (City of Toyota Stadium)28 September Japan v Ireland (Shizuoka Stadium Ecopa)28 September South Africa v Namibia (City of Toyota Stadium)4 October South Africa v Italy (Shizuoka Stadium Ecopa)5 October Japan v Samoa (City of Toyota Stadium)9 October Scotland v Russia (Shizuoka Stadium Ecopa)11 October Australia v Georgia (Shizuoka Stadium Ecopa)12 October New Zealand v Italy (City of Toyota Stadium)The Central Japan area – which encompasses the nine Prefectures of Aichi, Toyama, Ishikawa, Fukui, Nagano, Gifu, Shizuoka, Mie and Shiga, and includes the three major metropolitan areas of Nagoya, Shizuoka – is getting ready to treat fans from across the globe with Omotenashi, the Japanese spirit of hospitality. And you can experience that at the World Cup fanzones.Match venue: The City of Toyota Stadium will host four World Cup gamesAichi Prefecture and the city of Toyota will co-host a fanzone at the Sky Hall Toyota, where all matches held at the City of Toyota Stadium and more will be shown live on a big screen for free. Sky Hall Toyota is an indoor arena within a 15-minute walk of Toyotashi station on Meitetsu railway, close to the stadium itself.Live music performances will be held before matches and the venue will be equipped with a bar as well as a variety of food stalls offering local specialties, like pork cutlets with miso sauce.Here’s the schedule for the Aichi Fanzone…20 September 3-10pm, Japan v Russia23 September 3-10pm, Wales v Georgia28 September noon-10pm, Japan v Ireland, South Africa v Namibia5 October noon-10pm, Japan v Samoa12 October 10am-10pm, New Zealand v Italy13 October 3-10pm, Japan v Scotland19 October 3-9.15pm, Quarter-finals20 October 3-9.15pm, Quarter-finals26 October 3-7pm, Semi-final Striped delight: Japanese players applaud fans after a match at the City of Toyota Stadium(Getty Images) Fresh produce: Fruits on sale at the morning market in Takayama (Getty Images)In stark contrast to Wajima, the morning market in Takayama, Gifu Prefecture, is dominated by farm produce. Almost all of the fruits and vegetables found there are locally grown, some of them organic. Different produce like tomatoes, peaches, grapes, pears, apples and persimmons occupy the stalls according to the seasons.It is open 7am to noon from April to November to 8am to noon from December to March.last_img read more

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Amazon Prime Day Rugby Deals 2020

first_imgSave more than £10 on these Canterbury boots (RRP £55) that will be useful as the weather turns wetter!Buy Now from Amazon from £43.90Optimum Junior Player Kit BagIs your current kit bag falling apart or caked in mud from years of use? You can save more than £3 on this Optimum bag (RRP £17.99).Buy Now from Amazon for £14.19Shock Doctor Gel Max MouthguardAn essential item for any rugby player – there are savings of more than £4 on this adult mouthguard.Buy Now from Amazon for £10.92What is Amazon Prime Day?Think of it like Black Friday. Prime Day is a 48-hour flash sale from Amazon, where consumers can grab a whole host of bargains online.It’s held to mark Amazon’s birthday and started in 2015 on Amazon’s 20th birthday. Looking for a bargain? Amazon Prime Day will have deals for you! (Getty Images) Here’s how to find the best rugby deals on Amazon Prime Day – 13-14 October 2020 Need a new pair of shorts for rugby training or playing Ready 4 Rugby? You can save up to £7 on this classic Canterbury pair (RRP £20).Men’s – Buy Now from Amazon from £12.99Women’s – Buy Now from Amazon from £14.99Canterbury Men’s Phoenix Raze Soft Ground Rugby Boots The technology in this top keeps the wearer cool and comfortable for training – and you can save up to £10 in this Prime deal.Children’s – Buy Now from Amazon from £13.99 Men’s – Buy Now from Amazon from £15.49 AMZSPORT Men’s Sports Compression TightsThis ‘lightning deal’ means you can save £5 on these baselayer leggings – while stocks last.Buy Now from Amazon for £9.98Canterbury Cotton Rugby Shorts center_img Amazon Prime Day Rugby Deals 2020Amazon Prime Day has arrived! It takes place on Tuesday 13 to Wednesday 14 October 2020 and we have all the information you need to ensure you can find the best rugby deals.Prime Day is an annual event where Amazon Prime members are offered exclusive deals. Membership for Amazon Prime costs £7.99 a month in the UK ($12.99 in the US), plus you can get a 30-day free trial in the UK if you haven’t used the service before.For UK rugby fans, this is the perfect time to sign up for Amazon Prime if you haven’t already because Prime Video is the main broadcast partner for the Autumn Nations Cup and will be showing 14 of the 16 matches live.Related: The benefits of Amazon Prime for rugby fansPrime members not only get access to Prime Video – all those Autumn Nations Cup games as well as TV shows like the All Or Nothing series with the All Blacks and movies – but next-day delivery on Amazon orders, music streaming and much more.Sign up to Amazon PrimeAmazon Prime Day Rugby DealsPrime Day delivers a host of incredible flash sales and we’re highlighting all the best ones from Amazon’s rugby section here.Canterbury Adult Reinforcer Rugby HeadguardYou can get this headguard, which meets World Rugby’s specifications, for nearly half price on Prime Day – with an RRP of £50 you’re saving 48%!Buy Now from Amazon for £25.99Helly Hansen Junior Lifa Set Save 30% on this baselayer top and leggings set – ideal for keeping kids warm during training as winter approaches.Buy Now from Amazon for £27.17Canterbury Women’s Open Hem Stadium Pant Trousers Whether you want to keep warm at training or something comfortable to lounge in at home, these tracksuit bottoms (RRP £40) fit the bill – and you can save 30% right now.Buy Now from Amazon for £27.99Under Armour Men HeatGear ARMOUR 2.0 COMP ShortsSave up to 48% on these undershorts, which are available in four colours.Buy Now from Amazon from £13.50Canterbury Vapodri Evader Rugby Jersey Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Who is Liam Williams: Ten things you should know about the Wales full-back

first_img. Good times in the coal injection pic.twitter.com/x1sVvHJi7S— Liam Williams (@SanjayWills) November 20, 20183. No regional academy picked up the young Williams, so he went to work as a scaffolder at the Port Talbot steelworks, operating at heights of up to 300ft. It’s clear where his comfort in the air comes from! Who is Liam Williams: Ten things you should know about the Wales wing Capable of covering any position across the back three, Liam Williams is known as one of the best aerial players in the world.He’s won Six Nations, Champions Cup, Pro14 and Gallagher Premiership titles, making him one of the most decorated players in the northern hemisphere. Liam Williams celebrates after scoring against England in the 2021 Six Nations (Getty Images) Ten things you should know about Liam Williams1. Liam Williams was born on 9 April 1991 in Swansea and is 6ft 2in and 13st 9lb.2. He began playing rugby at Waunarlwydd RFC, where Wales prop Nicky Smith was also developed. From why his nickname is Sanjay to defusing bombs, find out more about the Scarlets starcenter_img 4. His nickname ‘Sanjay’ comes from a summer holiday to Greece when he was young. Another family thought he looked like Sanjay Kapoor, a market trader from EastEnders.5. The Scarlets picked him up when he was 20 years old, initially developing Williams at Llanelli RFC. He made his full debut against Connacht in September 2011.Liam Williams on debut against the Barbarians in 2012 (Getty Images)6. Promotion to the senior Wales squad was rapid – he was first involved in camp in December 2011 before making his debut against the Barbarians in June 2012.7. Saracens signed Williams on a three-year deal immediately after the full-back helped Scarlets to the Pro12 title. There he won two Premierships and a Champions Cup before rejoining Scarlets following the Saracens salary cap breach.8. The 2017 British & Irish Lions tour saw Liam Williams start all three Tests at full-back against New Zealand. His break in the first match was the spark for one of the Lions’ greatest tries.He was also selected for the Lions 2021 squad to tour South Africa.9. He refers to himself on social media as a ‘professional bomb defuser’ for his aerial ability.10. He has previously spoken about his struggles with a stammer, which he has addressed through speech therapy. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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‘Love the world into a new future,’ presiding bishop tells…

first_img Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments are closed. Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group ‘Love the world into a new future,’ presiding bishop tells Taiwan synod Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Rev. David Chee interprets as Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori delivers a sermon to a meeting of the Diocesan Synod of the Diocese of Taiwan. Photo/Richard Schori[Episcopal News Service] Drawing on her experiences during a tour of Episcopal and Anglican dioceses in Asia, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori preached at the opening service for the Annual Synod of the Episcopal Diocese of Taiwan on March 2.Noting the challenges facing people in many nations — poverty, homelessness, addiction, isolation, slavery, war and political upheaval — Jefferts Schori asked, “Where is the light? Where is hope for a different future?“Jesus’ response is to challenge us to embrace that suffering and hopelessness and let it be transformed by love,” she continued. “When he says, ‘those who lose their life will find it,’ he means turning toward that suffering rather than away from it. When we do, we will discover joy and life, rather than loneliness and hopelessness. There may still be captivity around us, but we have been set free to work toward a different reality.”Losing your life, she said, means working with tsunami survivors in Japan, assisting farmers in the northern Philippines, advocating for peace and reunification in the Korean peninsula, helping gambling addicts in Macau, breaking the cycle of drug and alcohol addiction in U.S. rural areas, offering healing and help to rape victims in Africa, aiding migrant workers everywhere, and seeing that children all over the world are educated so they can build a promising future.“Losing your life in order to find it is primarily about turning yourself inside out, giving yourself away to love the world into a new future,” Jefferts Schori said. “That’s what it means to be the light of the world — to let the light planted within us shine out, and dispel the dark.”The full text of the sermon follows.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori visits the kindergarten at St. James’ Church, Taichung, Taiwan. Photo/Richard SchoriTaiwan, one of the 110 dioceses of the Episcopal Church, is the last stop on Jefferts Schori’s three-week visit to Anglican Communion churches in Asia, including the Philippines, Japan, South Korea, China and Hong Kong. She was accompanied in Taiwan by Peter Ng, the Episcopal Church’s global partnership officer for Asia and the Pacific, and Richard Schori, the presiding bishop’s husband.During her time in Taiwan, the presiding bishop and her team also visited St. James’ Episcopal Church in Taichung, Taiwan, on Feb. 29, accompanied by Bishop David Lai. St. James’, which was founded 41 years ago at the request of U.S. servicemen, operates a popular kindergarten that serves 330 students ages 2 to 6. The kindergarten has a sister kindergarten in Boston, and the two schools occasionally exchange teachers. St. James’ also has a community service program and sponsors classes for all ages, including lessons in English and other languages. Its congregation, under the leadership of the Rev. Charles Chen, has funded 12 churches in the Philippines.Also on Feb. 29, the presiding bishop’s party toured Tung Hai University in Taichung, an ecumenical university of which the Episcopal Church of Taiwan is a founding member. Guided by a campus official, they visited the “Luce Chapel,” named after the Rev. Henry W. Luce (1868-1941), an Episcopal missionary who arrived in China in 1897. His elder son, Henry R. Luce, was the founder of Time, Life, and Fortune magazines.On March 1, the group visited St. Johns’ University near Taipei, founded by the Episcopal Church 45 years ago, and St. Stephen’s Church, Keelung, a small mission in a depressed town that ministers to children and distressed families.—Richard Schori contributed reporting for this story.– – – – – – – – – –Taiwan Diocesan SynodMarch 2, 2012The Whole Church ServingThe Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal ChurchGreetings from the rest of The Episcopal Church, who pray for you. When Isaiah challenges the people to be a light to the nations, he could be speaking to this part of the body of Christ. We are not only present in many nations, but we are meant to reach beyond those boundaries to all the other nations of the world, shining light in darkness, proclaiming love where there is hate and division, speaking in languages and ways that other nations can understand.Isaiah wrote to a people in exile, to refugees and hostages held for ransom, in pledge for those who remained in their occupied homeland. In some sense we are all held captive, waiting and working in eager anticipation for the world God intended at creation – a world of peace and justice for all peoples. Isaiah wrote to a people who were feeling hopeless, challenging them to become a witness to the new thing God is always doing, to be a light to other nations also in captivity.We, too, are still captive, along with those who surround us. The ills and suffering of the present age are not so different from Isaiah’s day, or Jesus’. People go to bed hungry, some sleep in subway stations or on the street. Others live in the prisons of addiction and grievous illness. Many live surrounded by the violence of war or the violence in their own homes and local communities. Some live in nations oppressed by overlords and tyrants. Countless numbers of children and adults are wage slaves, doomed to eke out a living hour by hour and day by day with little hope for anything more than dying young and exhausted. That reality is known in the poverty of the countryside as well as in wealthy city centers, where many people live lonely and disconnected lives even in the midst of crowds. Some are still sent off to prison for trivial crimes or reasons of conscience, or to labor camps where they disappear, forgotten. Where is the light, where is hope for a different future?Jesus’ response is to challenge us to embrace that suffering and hopelessness and let it be transformed by love. When he says, “those who lose their life will find it,” he means turning toward that suffering rather than away from it. When we do, we will discover joy and life, rather than loneliness and hopelessness. There may still be captivity around us, but we have been set free to work toward a different reality.Losing your life in order to find abundant life in Japan (Sendai and Tohoku) looks like working with tsunami survivors, teaching new job skills, sharing tea ceremonies with the displaced who are living lonely lives in temporary housing after their villages were destroyed.Losing your life in Shanghai looks like building homes for senior citizens, offering community and shelter to abandoned and lonely elders of many different faith traditions.Losing your life in the northern Philippines is building simple tramways for terrace farmers to haul implements, water, seeds, and crops up and down the steep and trackless hillsides.It means advocating for peace and reunification on the Korean peninsula, sending rice to those who are starving in the North, continuing to seek ways to bring fearful governments to the negotiating table, as well as bringing Anglicans together from across the world to learn the ways of peace.Losing your life means offering hope to gambling addicts in Macau, alcoholics in Honolulu, and drug addicts in rural communities in the United States. It means offering shelter, community, and hospitality to Filipino migrant workers in Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, and Saipan. It means advocating for just immigration policies everywhere, so that human beings might find decent and dignified ways to feed themselves and their families.Losing your life in Congo means Anglicans welcoming rape victims into shelters, where they can find healing and support for rebuilding their lives. Those women have had their lives taken away from them by violence, violence repeated as they and the children born to them are shunned and discarded by their husbands, families, and churches. Would you lose your life for these human beings despised by their own society?People of all ages discover new life in schools around the world, begun and supported by people who lose themselves in the work of teaching. Hong Kong is a province of some 30,000 to 40,000 yet serves several times as many school children. The Diocese of Haiti teaches 80,000 from preschool through university. Liberia is slowly rebuilding from civil war through the human capital developed in diocesan schools. Children in Taiwan are finding unexpected abundance in the kindergartens of this diocese. A man named Paul Rusch lost himself in love for the Japanese people beginning in the 1920s. He was expelled as the Second World War began, but he returned afterward to start a farming school, teaching desperately hungry people how to raise dairy cattle in the mountains. Today the milk and ice cream of that farm support an environmental program that teaches a new ethic for engaging the earth.Losing your life in order to find it is primarily about turning yourself inside out, giving yourself away to love the world into a new future. That’s what it means to be the light of the world – to let the light planted within us shine out, and dispel the dark. As the psalmist says, “weeping may last for a night, but joy comes in the morning” (Psalm 30:5). When we embrace the weeping of the night, we begin to partake in that creative dawn, that shedding of light into the world, and we begin to be a light to the nations.Will you take up your cross? Will you embrace the suffering around you, and let it touch your heart? Will you let love flow through you to heal that brokenness? Those who do will find their own lives renewed and redeemed in the process. That is the road to resurrection and new life. That is the direction in which the morning light dawns.Embrace the suffering around you, and you will discover what Isaiah dreamed of: “Sing for joy, O heavens, and exult, O earth; break forth, O mountains, into singing! For the LORD has comforted his people, and will have compassion on his suffering ones.” May this season of Lent bring a new willingness to see the suffering around us and embrace them. That is the road to peace and light and life abundant. Peace and light be with you! New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 March 2, 2012 at 6:44 pm What a powerful sermon by our Presiding Bishop. The title of this article — an excerpt from her sermon — could serve as a meditative prayer to recite as one goes through the day. Thank you!center_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest By ENS staffPosted Mar 2, 2012 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Tags Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments (1) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Margaret Bullitt-Jonas says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

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Convention ‘declines to take a position’ on Anglican Covenant

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Convention ‘declines to take a position’ on Anglican Covenant Bishops and deputies affirm Continuing Indaba, communion relationships Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET General Convention 2012 Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas addresses the House of Bishops July 10 on two resolutions concerning Anglican Communion relationships and the Anglican Covenant. Photo/Matthew Davies[Episcopal News Service – Indianapolis] The House of Bishops concurred with the deputies July 10 to affirm their commitment to building relationships across the Anglican Communion, especially through the Continuing Indaba program, and to decline to take a position on the Anglican Covenant.After considering eight resolutions, the General Convention’s committee on world mission recommended adoption of two resolutions on Anglican Communion relationships and the Anglican Covenant, a document that initially had been intended as a way to bind Anglicans globally across cultural and theological differences.Connecticut Bishop Ian Douglas, chair of the world mission committee, told ENS following the vote that the resolutions are “a genuine pastoral response because we are not of one mind, and to push a decision at this time would cause hurt and alienation in our church on both sides and instead we chose to stay in the conversation.”Resolution B005 portrays the decision not to take a position on the covenant as “a pastoral response to The Episcopal Church.”The resolution acknowledges that, following extensive study and prayerful consideration of the Anglican Covenant, there remains “a wide variety of opinions and ecclesiological positions in The Episcopal Church.”It also calls for the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies to appoint a task force “to continue to monitor the ongoing developments with respect to the Anglican Covenant and how this church might continue its participation.” That task force would report its findings to the next convention.In both houses, an amendment to remove the section that declines to adopt the covenant, as well as to set up a task force, was defeated.The Rev. Mark Harris, deputy from Delaware and a world mission committee member, told the deputies that he came to convention wanting to say no to the covenant. “[But] this is not about our wants but what we need … We need a place where we can continue to listen to the wide divides across the Anglican Communion,” he said. “Why must we provide an answer now…when we are in a massive effort to re-envision and restructure the church? We don’t need more division.”Deputy Jack Tull of Florida, a member of the world mission Committee, had submitted an earlier resolution (D006) that called on the church to decline to adopt the covenant “as I did not want to see us expend any more energy on this. But coming here has shown me and other committee members the proper approach to take. That insight is reflected in this resolution.”Council has been studying the covenant progress for the last six years, most recently through its D020 Task Force (called for in Resolution D020 from the 2009 meeting of convention). That task force recommended, and council agreed, in October 2011 to submit a resolution (A126) to this meeting of convention that would have convention state that the church is “unable to adopt the Anglican Covenant in its present form.”B005 expresses the convention’s gratitude to “those who so faithfully worked at producing and responding to the proposed Anglican Covenant.”Resolution B005 initially was submitted by Douglas. The original language encouraged the church to embrace the preamble and first three sections of the four-section Anglican Covenant. This, Douglas told ENS prior to convention, would ensure that the church does not remove itself from the ongoing covenant process.The document’s fourth section, which outlines a disciplinary method for resolving disputes in the communion, has been the covenant’s main sticking point.Resolution D008, also proposed by world mission, has been revised from the original legislation proposed by the Rev. Tobias Haller, a deputy from New York. Neither Haller’s nor the current version specifically mentions the covenant, but the original was modeled on legislation adopted by several Church of England dioceses that have opposed adopting the covenant.The resolution calls on the church to “deepen its involvement with communion ministries and networks using where applicable the Continuing Indaba process: conversations across differences to strengthen relationships in God’s mission” and encourage dioceses, congregations and individual Episcopalians to educate themselves about the Communion and “promote and support the Anglican Communion and its work.”Haller serves on the Continuing Indaba reference group alongside representatives from Africa and the United Kingdom. He said the program is “catching fire and inspiring people around the communion. It’s now being explored as a way for parishes within dioceses to spend time with one another and to learn from one another. Continuing Indaba will be the lifeblood and breath of the Anglican Communion.”Deputy Josephine Hicks from North Carolina, a member of convention’s world mission committee, endorsed the Continuing Indaba program, which is facilitating ways of enabling Anglicans to learn from one another and communicate across different contexts. “We heard on the committee a resounding support for maintaining relationships in the Anglican Communion,” she said.Hicks, who serves as the Episcopal Church’s lay member on the Anglican Consultative Council, the communion’s main policy-making body, said that it’s important for the Episcopal Church to continue to be a part of the various councils of the Anglican Communion because that is “where relationships are forged, where our voice can be heard, and where we have the chance to dispel inaccurate perceptions.”Some deputies said that the Episcopal Church does not need pieces of paper, such as the Anglican Covenant, to be in relationship.The resolution celebrates “the great blessing of the Anglican Communion in its diversity within community as autonomous churches in relationship bound together in our differences in service to God’s mission.”It also states that the Episcopal Church will “hold fast and reaffirm our historic commitment to and constituent membership in the Anglican Communion” as expressed in the preamble of the church’s constitution, and that it would “maintain and reinforce strong links across the communion” committing itself to continued participation in its councils.Douglas told the bishops that the resolution “gives gratitude for diversity of churches, celebrates relationships across differences, reaffirms our membership in the Anglican Communion, promises ongoing participation in the councils of the communion, and also lifts up and supports the good work that our church and other churches have been doing in the Continuing Indaba and commits us to educating our own so that we can deeper support the Anglican Communion.Communion-wide considerationThroughout the Anglican Communion, seven provinces have approved or subscribed to the Anglican Covenant. They are Ireland, Mexico, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, South East Asia, Southern Cone of America, and the West Indies.Two provinces – the Scottish Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia – have voted against adopting the covenant. The Episcopal Church in the Philippines bishops also have rejected the covenant.In March, it became clear that the Church of England could not adopt the covenant in its current form when a majority of its dioceses voted the document down.The Anglican Church of Southern Africa has adopted the document pending ratification at its next synod meeting later this year.The Church in Wales last April gave the covenant “an amber light, rather than a green light.” The church’s governing body said it feared the recent rejection of the covenant by the Church of England jeopardized its future and clarifications about that were now needed before a decision could be made. It sent questions on the matter to the Anglican Consultative Council, which meets later this year.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Anglican Covenant, Lisa Fox says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Donald Shire says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA July 11, 2012 at 4:55 pm Let’s just say the decision was a less than courageous one. The hope of almost everyone in the church is that the Covenant will just go away before 2015. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Job Listing July 10, 2012 at 7:56 pm “A pastoral response?”Are you kidding, General Convention? Rector Knoxville, TN Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ July 13, 2012 at 4:15 pm There is nothing immoderate about my comment or about the WSJ article. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 July 13, 2012 at 4:16 pm None needed. Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Continuing Indaba, General Convention, Anglican Communion, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA July 11, 2012 at 3:47 am Not me, Jeremy. I wanted to drive a silver stake through the heart of the odious Covenant. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments (8) Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Father Ron Smith says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 11, 2012 at 6:52 pm Let’s just say, Lionel, that TEC is now on a par with the Anglican Church in New Zealand and Polynesia – Openness to Communion, but not to Covenant. This will give the Anglican Communion Office time to get their act together – hopefully in a less proscriptive direction. Agape, Fr. Roncenter_img Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Donald Shire says: July 12, 2012 at 10:04 am But if some future version is less proscriptive, then even the Covenant’s few remaining proponents will see no point to it.This supposed “covenant” was always a centralization campaign, entirely inimical to Anglicanism.Let’s hope the next Archbishop of Canterbury puts a stop to this curia attempt.If he doesn’t, he’ll have to learn the same experiential lesson that the Communion has taught Dr. Williams. Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Lionel Deimel says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Donald Shire says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID July 13, 2012 at 4:11 pm The Covenant may not be as important as an op-ed piece in todays WSJ which is critical of our church and especially our PB and Executive Council. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By Matthew Davies and Mary Frances Schjonberg Posted Jul 10, 2012 Jeremy Bates says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Jeremy Bates says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

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Prayers and proclamations abound for Pope Francis

first_img Maureen Vitalone says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID March 17, 2013 at 2:32 pm I was raised Roman Catholic, and am proud to have become a member of the far more Christ-like Episcopal Church! Of course I believe in equailty for women, and those of us born Gay (and Proud!) But, let’s please be open-minded and keep Pope Francis I in our prayers, and kind thoughts. After all, many folks are “evolving”, as they examine their hearts- an example of this, is our fine President Obama! The new Pope is a far better choice than the last Pope, and I believe that while Padre Jorje is not perfect, his heart and values seem to be in the right place. Let’s work on overcoming our differences, and dissolving long-standing prejudices, about women’s roles, and our “value” as Gay Christians- let’s please be positive, Patient, kind, and give the new Pope a chance to make a difference- let’s not be part of the problem, with cold, “hater” attitudes. Change is happening world-wide; so many Catholics I know personally, are fully supportive of their Gay sisters & brothers; supporting Marriage Equality, etc. Let’s be firm & confident in who we are; but be the stronger, more mature, more Christian voices, than those who would judge us as “unworthy”. Please, let’s give the new Pope, a chance! I’m excited, about all this- it’s a Blessing, to have a man of this caliber, going up against the Roman Curia. Tough job, ahead of him. He’s got my interest, hope, and prayers. Ecumenical & Interreligious mark friesland says: By Matthew DaviesPosted Mar 14, 2013 March 14, 2013 at 4:55 pm Sorry but I find nothing to celebrate about a new pope who fought a proposed law to legalize marriage and adoption by same-sex couples as “war against God” and “a maneuver by the devil,” even as his own church has protected pedophilic clergy who have worked their crimes on defenseless children. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR stewart david wigdor says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Danny L Anderson Jr says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Prayers and proclamations abound for Pope Francis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (7) March 17, 2013 at 6:00 pm Congratulations to the new Pope Francis. Jesus taught us to see him, our Lord ,in each of us. I believe that joy must be greatest in the Pope, especially He that loves the poor to bring them the hope of the Kingdom of Heaven. I feel this Pope will touch everyone’s heart in a special way.One question I have for us Episcopalians: do not we want our Church to be Holy for we worship there and do not we want the ecstasy of lovemaking to come from the Sacrament of marriage made from the Presence of God? Think of these on your way to find the Kingdom of Heaven. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events Doug Desper says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA March 14, 2013 at 7:11 pm The Roman Church labels gay souls as “intrinsically disordered.” This is dehumanizing, hateful, and can serve as kindling to start a bonfire of violence. In April 2011, the Vatican’s representive at the UN voiced strong opposition to a UN Human Rights Council resolution naming the protection of LGBT persons against discrimination and violence an official human right.” As is well known, many priests and bishops in the Roman Church have been “robbing Peter to touch Paul.” With the ongoing child-rape scandal (and planned efforts to avoid notifying law enforcement) no pope or RC clergy has the moral credibilty to tell other people how to live. I think ARCIC is a total waste of money. Also, one of the Cardinals who managed coverups to shelter rapist priests, voted for the new pope (without any sense of shame). New pope no doubt less hateful than the last one (who wore a swastika in 1945). Also, consider “Dominus Iesus,” which labeled other churches as “ecclesiastical communities.” We are not considered members of “the Church.” What an insult.I realize that some church officials will be polite. I want nothing to do with the RC church. Ironic thing, I think Pope Francis will be shoved around by other forces in the Vatican. A reminder, non-heterosexual people are “intrinsically disordered.” Non-Roman churches are not “real churches.” The best (recent) friend for Anglicans in Vatican was Pope Paul VI. John Paul I didn’t live long enough (sadly). I wouldn’t entrust any child to the care of a priest. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Newly elected Pope Francis, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina leaves after praying at the Santa Maria Maggiore Basilica in Rome, March 14, 2013. Photo: REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi[Episcopal News Service] Pope Francis began his first full day as Bishop of Rome and leader of the world’s 1.2 billion Roman Catholics March 14 in private prayer at a Roman basilica dedicated to the Virgin Mary, but also encircled in prayer as an abundance of messages of support and words of expectation poured in from all corners of the globe.Argentinian-born priest the Rev. Thomas Mansella described the new pope, whom he knew during his service as Archbishop Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, as a man of deep humility and faith.Mansella, former translation coordinator for the Episcopal Church, recently served as interim rector at St. John’s Anglican Cathedral in Buenos Aires, Argentina.The Roman Catholic cathedral in Buenos Aires is just a few blocks from the Anglican cathedral and “‘Padre Jorge,’ as he wanted to be called – even as archbishop and cardinal – used to walk the few blocks from his residence to attend several ecumenical events at St. John’s,” Mansella told ENS. “On many occasions he just rode the subway to wherever he had to go. He is very low key. He says what he has to say, and then sits down.”Mansella said Bergoglio is well respected in Argentina. “He is very ecumenical – especially with us Anglicans – and a man of prayer and great spirituality … He has spoken frequently for social justice. But because he has condemned the current Argentinian official corruption, he is not liked by the powers that be. So, perhaps by strong influence he will be a force to clean up the Roman Curia. But do not expect big proclamations.”Bergoglio served as archbishop of Buenos Aires since 1998. He was made a cardinal by Pope John Paul II in 2001. He is the first non-European to lead the Roman Catholic Church in more than 1,000 years.Shortly after the March 13 announcement, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said in a statement that the Episcopal Church will pray for the new Bishop of Rome, “and for the possibility of constructive dialogue and cooperation between our churches.”Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby also issued a statement. “We wish Pope Francis every blessing in the enormous responsibilities that he has assumed on behalf of Roman Catholics around the world,” he said, calling the new pontiff “a compassionate pastor of real stature who has served the poor in Latin America, and whose simplicity and holiness of life is remarkable.”There was early confusion about whether Bergoglio took the papal name in honor of Francis of Assisi, founder the Franciscan order, or Francis Xavier, one of the first seven Jesuits and the patron saint of Roman Catholic missionaries.According to reports, Fr. Federico Lombardi, the Vatican spokesman, said the new pope chose the name in honor of St. Francis of Assisi.The Rev. Margaret R. Rose, the Episcopal Church’s ecumenical and interreligious deputy, told ENS that she hopes Pope Francis “will be a leader who risks doing some new things for the sake of the Gospel and who follows in the footsteps of his namesake in calling for the care of the poor and all creation. Our prayers are with him as we seek partnership and the unity of all Christians.”Bishop Wilfrido Ramos-Orench, global partnerships officer for the Episcopal Church’s Province IX, said the election is “a historic moment for the Roman Catholic Church and for the entire Latin American continent. His chosen name to me is very revealing. Hopefully he will follow the path of Francis of Assisi in solidarity with the poor, the oppressed and the dispossessed. May his papacy open the way for authentic ecumenical dialogue and the healing of broken relationships with us Anglicans and other Christian bodies.”Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee Bishop John Bauerschmidt, co-chair of the Anglican-Roman Catholic USA dialogue (ARCUSA), said the election “is a sign of hope for all Christians.”“The election at the same time of the first pope from Latin America and the first member of the Society of Jesus to hold this office breaks new ground,” he told ENS. “I pray that Pope Francis will continue to build upon the good relationships that have been developed between Anglicans and Roman Catholics over the last half-century, while also breaking new ground of his own in the pursuit of the unity that Jesus calls us to.”The Society of Jesus, whose members are called Jesuits, is known for its missionary work and its commitment to social justice and evangelization. Early in their history, the Jesuits ran afoul of the pope, the Roman Curia and some nations more than once, but mostly for political and economic reasons rather than theological ones.The Rt. Rev. Gregory Venables, Anglican bishop of Argentina and former primate of the Anglican Church of the Southern Cone, described Bergoglio’s election as “an inspired choice.”“Many are asking me what he is really like. He is much more of a Christian, Christ-centered and Spirit filled, than a mere churchman. He believes the Bible as it is written,” said Venables, according to a report from the Anglican Communion News Service. “He is consistently humble and wise, outstandingly gifted yet a common man. He is no fool and speaks out very quietly yet clearly when necessary.”For instance, Venables said, the former cardinal told him over breakfast one morning that “the Ordinariate was quite unnecessary and that the church needs us as Anglicans.”In 2009, Pope Benedict XVI, Pope Francis’ predecessor, created the Anglican Ordinariates in England and the United States to allow provisions for former or disaffected Anglicans to join the Roman Catholic Church. The controversial announcement came as a surprise to many Anglicans, including then-Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams who had not been consulted about the plan despite having built a close relationship with Pope Benedict.While he was primate of the Southern Cone, Venables offered oversight to conservative members of parishes and dioceses breaking away from the Episcopal Church and the Anglican Church of Canada.The Rev. Alyson Barnett-Cowan, the Anglican Communion’s director for unity, faith and order, told ENS that the fact that Pope Francis is from Latin America, “that he seems to be a genuinely humble man, and that he has chosen the name he has signal a fresh direction … [I] hope that he will rejuvenate the Roman Catholic Church and give it fresh spirit and vision.”Several Anglican primates issued statements about the pope’s election as they anticipate the formal enthronement of Welby, their own new spiritual leader, in an invitation-only ceremony on March 21 at Canterbury Cathedral.Archbishop Phillip Aspinall, primate of the Anglican Church of Australia, said that Pope Francis brings with him “a wonderful reputation for social justice, care for the poor and humility. His appointment as leader of the Roman Catholic Church comes with great hope, expectations and responsibility … The new Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, will be enthroned in London next week, meaning two of the largest Christian world communions each have new leaders to face and address the challenges of the future.”Francis’ installation Mass is due to be held March 19 at St. Peter’s basilica.The Most Rev. Richard Clarke, archbishop of Armagh and primate of All Ireland, said: “In company with millions of men and women throughout the world of different Christian traditions to his own, I assure the new pope of our prayers as he begins his new ministry. An Argentinian of European parentage, he brings together in his own person the cultures, hopes and spiritual needs of the first world and of the developing world, so much to be valued amidst the complexities and apprehensions of our globalised earth. He has been a champion of the needs of the poor and dispossessed, and, in the simplicity of his own lifestyle, he has sought to reflect the life of the much-loved saint whose name he now carries in the future, Saint Francis.”The ecumenical world also is abuzz with reactions and words of hope and encouragement.The Rev. Olav Fykse Tveit, general secretary of the World Council of Churches (WCC), called the election “a turning point in the life of the Roman Catholic Church, but it also has an impact on people of other churches and faiths.”In a statement, Tveit said that ever since the Second Vatican Council of the 1960s, the Roman Catholic Church and the World Council of Churches have enjoyed constructive dialogue and cooperation on matters of faith, witness and the fundamental unity of the whole body of Christ.“We have learned that we are pilgrims together in the one ecumenical movement, and we are particularly grateful for the way the Catholic Church works with us on the highly significant issues of unity, ecclesiology, mission and interreligious dialogue,” he said. “Now, in close collaboration with Pope Francis, we look forward to building on this positive relationship with the Catholic Church that has been nurtured so carefully in the past.”The Roman Catholic Church is not an official member of the WCC, but delegates and observers often attend major meetings.In the U.S., National Council of Churches President Kathryn M. Lohre said: “All of us have seen profound growth among Christians of every tradition in Latin America and throughout the southern hemisphere. We pray all of us will be attentive and responsive to the Christian witness that is emanating from that part of the world, and we wish Pope Francis the very best as he begins his new ministry.”Again, the Roman Catholic Church is not a member of the NCC, but the U.S. Catholic Conference and has been active with the NCC in ecumenical ministries and programs, and Roman Catholics have served on NCC commissions and committees.President Barack Obama also welcomed the appointment in a message “on behalf of the American people.”“As a champion of the poor and the most vulnerable among us, he carries forth the message of love and compassion that has inspired the world for more than two thousand years — that in each other we see the face of God,” Obama said. “As the first pope from the Americas, his selection also speaks to the strength and vitality of a region that is increasingly shaping our world, and alongside millions of Hispanic Americans, those of us in the United States share the joy of this historic day.“Just as I appreciated our work with Pope Benedict XVI, I look forward to working with His Holiness to advance peace, security and dignity for our fellow human beings, regardless of their faith.  We join with people around the world in offering our prayers for the Holy Father as he begins the sacred work of leading the Catholic Church in our modern world.”— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 March 15, 2013 at 2:17 am I am a gay man and very conservative in my theology of the Christian faith being brought up in the Pentecostal Holiness church tell I was 15 .Let me tell you this most Pentecostal churches think like Rome that the rest of us are all going to hell but them . I know I can’t be changed I was born gay . Many Pentecostal pastors tried to pray the demon of homosexuality out of me . Also I prayed long and hard to change as I was told it was a one way ticket to hell. The Episcopal Church showed me a new way . That God loves me just as I am , and there is nothing wrong with me . The Episcopal Church embraces my conservative theology as long as I have respect for all under the big tent of this Church of Jesus Christ. I think God for that . If it was not for The Episcopal Church I would be dead by my own hand , thinking I had no way to change so no chance to gain salvation.The Bishop Of Rome has my prayers and respect as a follow Christian and brother in Christ, but he will not embrace gay people with true love because he sees us as sick unnatural human beings . As for woman you can be a Sunday school teacher , clean up the church or become a nun , so your not equal to men . How can people blame people like me for not bowing down and being happy about what is going on in the Roman Church ? Roman does not even consider us a church . I will pray for all Christians as the Christ of the Bible has taught me , but be happy about where Rome is going no. Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA David Krohne says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Andrew Sorbo says: March 14, 2013 at 7:50 pm I was wondering how long it would be before the growling started. Cultural revisionists are not content until belief bends to will. To treat one with dignity does not mean to bless all that he or she asks. If it weren’t for the absence of a decent liturgy I believe that some Episcopalians would be much happier in the United Church of Christ or Metropolitan Community Church. In those churches one’s personal journey is the definition of faith. Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK March 14, 2013 at 5:03 pm All the profuse exuberance about the new pope will settle down to reality very soon as people realize this is no John XXIII seeking to open the windows and ket in a breath of fresh aur into a church which has retreated since Vatican II into the Middle Ages. Bergoglio is a man who will not grant women the dignity and equality in the church which they have been denied fora millenium. Nor will he end the war on gay people which his mentor John Paul II waged with vehemence and which his predecessor Benedict XVI continued. This is a man who, like his two immediate predecessors, is a straight male chauvinist and homophobe, and like his immediate predecessors, he is a “half Christian”: full of charity to the poor but totally lacking in their ability to treat women and gays with dignity. What we are seeing in Rome is just the latest chapter of a morally bankrupt church using all the pomp of Hollywood to make itself look like what it is not, a truly Christian institution.last_img read more

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Celebrations of marriage equality, court rulings continue across church

first_img Doug Desper says: By Pat McCaughan and Sharon SheridanPosted Jul 1, 2013 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bob Boyd says: Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ty West says: Marriage Equality, Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Same-Sex Marriage Comments (22) Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ July 1, 2013 at 6:41 pm I remember when The Episcopal Church offered childcare – no need anymore. There is no next generation – except of course for Islam.“DEARLY beloved, we are gathered together here in the sight of God, and in the face of this company, to join together this Man and this Woman in holy Matrimony; which is an honourable estate, instituted of God, signifying unto us the mystical union that is betwixt Christ and his Church: which holy estate Christ adorned and beautified with his presence and first miracle that he wrought in Cana of Galilee, and is commended of Saint Paul to be honourable among all men: and therefore is not by any to be entered into unadvisedly or lightly; but reverently, discreetly, advisedly, soberly, and in the fear of God. Into this holy estate these two persons present come now to be joined. If any man can show just cause, why they may not lawfully be joined together, let him now speak, or else hereafter for ever hold his peace.”Yes, I object – they are not “man and woman.” Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Human Sexuality, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs July 4, 2013 at 1:04 am I have known respectable gay people in and outside of the church. I do not think any of them would approve of a priest dancing the “jig” on the streets of New York in a stole they wore officiating at their first gay wedding. I believe General Convention approved a provisional rite to bless same sex unions which included a conscious clause, not a rite to marry same sex couples. But what to the teachings of the church matter when one has an agenda to promote. “We in the Episcopal Church” don’t seem to think they matter much. Tags AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Prop8-Doma, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC July 2, 2013 at 9:26 pm I too noted the bi-coastal nature of this report, which could well have included the Episcopal Church in Minnesota, where we celebrated not only the end of DOMA but also the passage of legislation authorizing same sex marriage. This is not New York. This is not California. This is no cosmopolitan pocket. This is America. I am sorry you are confused but do not understand how any thinking adult can be at this late date. Grow with us. Richard Meadows says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books George Elliot says: July 4, 2013 at 12:51 am I have known respectable gay people in and outside of the church. I do not think any of them would approve of a priest dancing the “jig” on the streets of New York in a stole they wore officiating at their first gay wedding. The teaching of the Episcopal Church is that in a Christian marriage “the woman and man enter into a life-long union.” (BCP, 861) I believe General Convention approved a provisional rite to bless same sex unions which included a conscious clause, not a rite to marry same sex couples. But what to the teachings of the church matter when one has an agenda to promote. “We in the Episcopal Church” don’t seem to think they matter much. July 2, 2013 at 8:12 am The Episcopal Church’s trip down the slippery slope is accelerating.TEC has lost the very concept of speaking the truth in love. We are all miserable sinners, and there is no health in us, whether those words were pulled from the Prayer Book or not. Homosexuality is a sin, one of many – but it is the one which the Church has decided is to be glorified rather than called out as disobedience to a holy God.TEC once again continues its course of attempting to remake God in our own image. It’s becoming more and more difficult to stay. July 3, 2013 at 7:01 am I think that the Republic which has survived the Civil War, two devastating World Wars, the Korean War, the Vietnam War and two totally unnecessary Bush Wars plus a 60 year insane costly war on drugs, an oil embargo, the devastation of 9/11 and several economic downturns, not to mention the Monica Lewinsky scandal, can easily survive gay marriage. Have no fear. July 4, 2013 at 3:35 pm Reading these responses to the story about the celebrations of the Supreme Court’s decisions last week has made me very sad. I staunchly support those decisions and rejoice for several gay and lesbian friends now that they are able to marry…at least in some of these United States. On the other hand, I also share with more traditional brothers and sisters in TEC their distress at many of the directions the church is going, chief among them being the way all of us have dealt with the division that these responses demonstrate. This division started long before the issues of homosexuality in the church became the straw that broke the back of some of us. It includes very important matters– the way the liturgy is conducted, our understanding of sin, our response to what has happened to the institution of marriage, the mission of the Gospel, changes in our culture which cause anxiety and anger, and the impact of these changes on our understanding of our faith. These disagreements matter, are not trivial, but they require respectful listening and a curb on the rush to condemn. Simplistic as this may sound I do believe that unless we remember that we are children of the God we know in Jesus Christ and act on it, this church is doomed. The two parties that have split the church share a sense of self-righteousness about our understanding of the faith which has closed us off from listening to each other. I’m not saying that listening to each other will be easy, but it’s better than drawing away from each other while hurling disdain at the “enemy”. Let’s ask questions of each other instead of expressing condemnation and sarcasm.Finally, the Court did not declare Prop. 8 unconstitutional. It did not rule on the constitutionality of same sex marriage at all: that battle is still out there. It simply threw the case back to California, saying that the plaintiffs had no legal standing. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI David Yarbrough says: July 2, 2013 at 1:41 pm Rev. Canon Susan Russell, you proclaimed to the world as I do that you are disciple of Lord Jesus Christ, Son of Almighty God, maker of whole universe and its contained living and dead. And you are our Shepard maintaining apostolic succession since Lord Jesus established Church thru solid rock faith of Peter, to take care of His sheep. We know Almighty God is holding all knowledge of truth and His creation is complete and has no mistake. He gave all His living creation a unique identity and unique role to play to glorify His name as long we breathe His breath and later our body goes to dust where it belong to and spirit goes to God from where it came .Question is “If” homosexual marriage was God’s plan since beginning of life 1) why did God feel necessity to create opposite sex out of men’s body part? 2) Why did God curse women with child delivering pain, before she can enjoy fruits of her pain delivering a child with happy natural family life and gay family without child delivery pain, but still enjoy family? Assuming homosexual marriage is God’s plan, and gays are naturally carefree. Why do some gay cry for baby? If they cry for baby why does lesbian not marry a man and gay-man marry a woman and make a natural family as God the Almighty plan for to create woman as partner? Childless couples are blessed by God, as it is no fault of them and they are blessed by God when they mitigate their childless pain by rearing orphan or abused child. No person is absolute or 100% gay or 100% bisexual. If it is not true then, people like Bishop Robinson could not be biological father of children or a lesbian could not be biological mother. God is righteous God He did not favor gay couple with a child without child delivering pain. It is true saying “No pain no gain”. May God bless you! Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tom Blair says: Same-Sex Blessings, Joseph F Foster says: July 2, 2013 at 1:41 pm I love seeing religious organizations prove that acceptance, love, and embracing differences are not only compatible with religion, they’re the foundation of it! (Besides, as a card-carrying Jewish mother, of course I hope I have a gay son, so he’ll never replace me with another woman . . . )People who object to same-sex marriage on religious grounds should look at the states which have had marriage equality for a few years, and it’s clear that none of those dire predictions by opponents have come true. No one is marrying their pets, it’s still legal to play hockey in Canada, there hasn’t been mass public fornication in Vermont, and California has not suddenly decided to force all men to shave their legs. In fact, as this song makes clear, “Western Civilization Is Still Intact” – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_Gz3yx2YGs Submit an Event Listing July 2, 2013 at 5:29 pm And we others in Cincinnati were not joyful but fearful for the future of the Republic. And I will vote against making homosexual marriage legal in Ohio. Advocacy Peace & Justice, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Lauren Mayer says: Alda Morgan says: Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC George Elliot says: Doug Desper says: July 27, 2013 at 8:23 am Now that the celebrations have died down, help get the Voting Rights Act back up and running. Or the celebrations are like kissing you sister. Peace and love. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH July 2, 2013 at 5:32 pm Remember that ENS’s job is to push the “official” line, i.e. the line touted by the Presiding Bishop and much of the hierarchy. July 1, 2013 at 10:12 pm Mr Blair, with all due respect, then you should also be objecting when opposite sex couples who cannot bear children marry. She may be in menopause, he may be infertile. They cannot create another generation naturally either. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Joseph F Foster says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET July 1, 2013 at 9:42 pm I’m confused when the greater New York and Californian dioceses celebrate their causes that it’s equated by ENS to a movement “across the Church”. This is one reason that it will be a very good thing when the Church Center moves away from the one small island called Manhattan. How about giving more details about the celebrations so that the rest of the Church can get the whole, vivid, unforgettable point? Like really describing the Gay Disco Mass held every last Sunday in June by St. Mark’s in New York City. The Eucharist’s worship space is changed by the lesbian priest into a dance floor complete with a hovering disco ball while the celebrant and worship leaders employ secular music like “We Are Family” and “Love Train” to affirm the congregation. This kind of Eucharist is held in the same New York diocese where monsters, ghouls, and the undead parade in their cathedral at Halloween to an impressed assembly. Such cultural self-affirmation has nothing in common with the Scripture’s example of John the Baptist who called the disciples to become lesser so that “He (Jesus) can become greater”. Most of the Church is not becoming the cultural “new normal” by disgracing the Eucharist for self–appreciation. Perhaps it’s time to stop calling ourselves the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America. The United States has over 320 million people, of which the Episcopal Church’s attendees comprise a fragment. Many of the policies, values, and concerns of our leaders do not reflect the Christian expressions of this nation of which we are supposed to be a missionary society, but instead reflect a very small liberal revisionist concern of a few cosmopolitan pockets. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Celebrations of marriage equality, court rulings continue across church Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments are closed. Submit a Press Release July 2, 2013 at 1:09 pm We in Cincinnati were joyful, as members of the multicultural Church of Our Saviour/La Iglesia de Nuestro Salvador carried banners in the Pride Parade for our parish (“Out since 1970”) and Integrity; joined by friends from many other Episcopal congregations. One dear couple carried a sign “22 years of UNwedded bliss: Ohio, let’s make it legal!” Press Release Service July 6, 2013 at 9:03 am Meh.We have a pretty full nursery at St. Augustine’s Episcopal in Croton-on-Hudson, NY.No one much cares if the parents are gay, straight, married, divorced, single or widowed.All are welcome. July 16, 2013 at 6:31 pm Here in San Diego, CA, we have just come through our Pride Parade/Festival. Over 200,000 people came out for the celebration, including a contingent of 100+ Episcopalian priests and lay person from St. Paul’s Cathedral/SD. Prop 8 was declared unconstitution by the US district court and that ruling was left standing by SCOTUS. And so we all are celebrating in California.You say, “I also share with more traditional brothers and sisters in TEC their distress at many of the directions the church is going, chief among them being the way all of us have dealt with the division that these responses demonstrate.” And how do you and the traditionalists think we GLBT Episcopalians across the nation have felt all these years about the path of unequal treatment TEC has been following with respect to us? Surely you do not forget the hateful resolution the Lambath Conference passed against GLBT Episcopalians/Anglicans? Surely you remember how our belovid Bishop Robinson was treated by some in the House of Bishops, how the ABC banned him from coming to the conference? Where were the traditionalists trying to truly “listen to/with us.” Did they tarry even a minute to worry about us in their haste to take anti-GLBT actions within TEC? I ask you these questions in keeping with your message of July 4, Independence Day. Episcopal Diocese of New York Bishop Andrew M.L. Dietsche holds up a sign while riding a float during New York’s Pride Parade. Photo: Sharon Sheridan/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] Steve Price’s white gardenia boutonniere and diamond pinkie ring were bittersweet tributes among a sea of joy at the June 27 “Celebration of Equality” at St. John’s Pro-Cathedral in Los Angeles.From Los Angeles to New York, worshippers gathered across the church to celebrate in very public and very personal ways, after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) and ruled California’s ban on gay marriage (Proposition 8) unconstitutional.The court’s decisions extended many previously denied federal benefits to same-sex couples married in the U.S. states that allow such unions and paved the way for gay marriages to resume in California.“I’ve been fighting this fight for 30 years,” said Price, a co-founder of the Holy Spirit emerging Episcopal community in Silver Lake, California.While celebrating being able to “experience God’s love at this moment with one another,” Price said his gardenia was a tribute to “the ghosts of all those people who didn’t make it to the finish line.” The diamond was a family heirloom he made into a pinkie ring. It would have been a wedding ring, but his partner “died of AIDS; he’s not here for this.”Others at the celebration wore gay pride t-shirts bearing the familiar slogan: “The Episcopal Church welcomes you.”Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop Suffragan Mary Glasspool sparked exuberant cheers and sustained thunderous applause among about two hundred worshippers at the June 27 Los Angeles service with just her opening remark: “A lot has happened this past week.”“It is interesting to note how much does seem to happen in late June,” added Glasspool, who in 2009 became the first openly gay, partnered female priest to be elected a bishop in the Episcopal Church.For example, she said, June 28 was the 44th anniversary of the beginning of the Stonewall Riots, “that series of events which, for many people, marked the beginning of the gay rights movement in this country.”And “June 24, was the 40th anniversary of the UpStairs Lounge arson attack in New Orleans, which killed 32 people and elicited remarkable little attention at the time and an even shameful lack of response from anyone in authority, including leaders of religious institutions,” added Glasspool.She told the joyous gathering that she chose one of the evening’s lessons (Romans 8:35-39) “because it was the one piece of Scripture that kept me in the church when I was working through my own sexuality and thought maybe God hated me because I was a lesbian,” she said.But she added that, if given the opportunity again she might have chosen the Parable of the Laborers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:1-16) instead because it says “something about God’s overwhelming grace given to everyone who will receive it, and our human and many times destructive difficulty in celebrating the gifts that another receives, in celebrating our diversity.”She challenged the gathering to move from “equality to solidarity,” learning to authentically rejoice in the gifts others receive. “How can we work together to further the reign of God?”The United States was also celebrating Gay Pride Week and in many places, many celebrations of the week and the court rulings became one.Bishop J. Jon Bruno of the Diocese of Los Angeles, assisted by deacon Margaret McCauley and Archdeacon Joanne Leslie, celebrates Eucharist flanked by two LGBT couples at a “celebration of equality” service at the Pro-Cathedral of St. John on June 27. Photo: Janet KawamotoIn New York City, more than 100 people began the day worshiping at the annual disco Pride Mass at St. Mark’s Church-in-the-Bowery. The service started with a rainbow-clad Earl Giaquinto singing “Over the Rainbow” and ended with dancing beneath a strobe light and colored spotlights.With live music quietly playing behind her, the Rev. Stephanie Spellers, canon for missional vitality for the Diocese of Long Island, celebrated the Eucharist wearing the green chasuble of retired Massachusetts Bishop Suffragan Barbara Harris, the first woman ordained bishop in the Anglican Communion.The day’s second reading was an excerpt from the Supreme Court ruling overturning parts of DOMA.“We have a lot to celebrate today,” the Rev. Winnie Varghese, St. Mark’s rector, said in her sermon. “When government acts on behalf of people, it feels like liberation.”When Jesus set his face for Jerusalem, he headed toward the center of power, just as prophets like Elisha did to “proclaim what is right in the cities of the king,” she said. Varghese urged worshippers to celebrate but also to continue that prophetic role in pushing for rights for all people.The Rev. Megan Sanders, interim rector at the Church of St. Andrew on Staten Island, distributes communion June 30 at a Eucharist offered by the NYC Metro Chapter of Integrity for Pride Parade marchers unable to attend church before the event along Fifth Avenue. Photo:Sharon Sheridan/Episcopal News ServiceOn Manhattan’s 38th Street, the Rev. Megan Sanders, interim rector at the Church of St. Andrew on Staten Island, celebrated a Eucharist planned by the NYC Metro Chapter of Integrity for marchers unable to attend church before the parade along Fifth Avenue. Sanders, who recently married Kristin Robyn, said she “cried in my car all the way to work” when she heard about the Supreme Court ruling. “I was so excited, but also unsure of what this means and how do we protect people who aren’t married.”In the parade, Episcopalians from the dioceses of New York and Newark marched carrying church banners in front of a float. New York Bishop Andrew M.L. Dietsche and his wife Margaret waved from the float to crowds lining city streets, who were dancing to the float’s music and cheering. One male couple stood, dressed in white, beneath a sign saying “Just married today.” One of the grooms mouthed the words “thank you” as the float passed. At several spots, including the Episcopal Church of the Ascension, volunteers handed out water to marchers.“I’m happy to be here,” Dietsche said, noting the diocese’s support for marriage equality and full inclusion of LGBT people within the church. “I think that people are feeling a new day in America, and we just hope to be part of it and celebrate.”After the parade, Dietsche participated in and spoke briefly at a Pride Evensong at St. Luke in the Fields.“We are witnessing as people of faith a monumental shift in the hearts and minds of people … at an astonishing speed,” he said.The church’s parade float is “enormously important,” he added. “It says the Episcopal Church welcomes you, and that’s a message that is extremely important for the church to express in the LGBT community, because it didn’t always. Maybe we’re beginning to heal some of the damage that has been done in the past by the church.”The Rev. Barbara Lundblad, Lutheran pastor and preaching professor at Union Theological Seminary, preached on Luke’s Gospel of the widow and the unjust judge.“We have to keep pestering until every person in the country has the right to vote and has the right to marry and has the right to be treated well, including people who are single,” she said. “It is possible to celebrate and keep pestering. It may be the only faithful way to celebrate in this time in our history.”Wearing a stole she made for officiating at her first gay wedding, the Rev. Susan Copley, rector of Christ Episcopal Church and San Marcos Mission in Tarrytown, New York, marches in the New York Pride Parade on June 30. Photo:Sharon Sheridan/Episcopal News ServiceA June 26 evening celebration at Washington National Cathedral “was a joyful night, full of laughter and tears as those who had suffered so much discrimination savored a cultural and legal turning point in our shared march toward justice,” said the Very Rev. Gary Hall, dean, in a June 30 sermon.The cathedral bells had pealed at noon “as a sign of unity with the LGBT community,” according to a cathedral press release. Hundreds of people gathered at the cathedral to celebrate the Supreme Court decisions.More than one hundred people attended a June 27 “nuts and bolts” forum at St. Margaret’s Church in Palm Desert, California, in the Diocese of San Diego, according to the Rev. Lane Hensley, rector.Hensley, who said he is scheduled to officiate at a same-sex wedding in September, said the forum was intended to begin a conversation about the practicalities of living into the court’s decisions.On June 30, Bishop Mark Holmerud of the Sierra Pacific Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and Diocese of California Bishop Marc Andrus preached and presided, respectively, at an open-air Gay Pride Parade Eucharist just before San Francisco’s 43rd annual Pride Celebration.On the day of the Supreme Court’s decisions, Andrus wrote on his blog that being at San Francisco City early that morning to await the announcement from Washington, D.C. “with the statue and spirit of martyred San Francisco supervisor Harvey Milk looking down on us as current Board of Supervisors President David Chiu noted, was to be grateful for the work, witness, and sacrifice of all those present, all those in many other places, and those whose work provided the base upon which we now stand.”Andrus thanked the clergy and lay people of the Diocese of California “who have been so faithful in their struggle to bring this moment to reality, over decades” and the Episcopal bishops of dioceses in the state of California and the Episcopal bishops of 22 dioceses who joined him in signing two amicus briefs filed in the cases.–The Rev. Pat McCaughan and Sharon Sheridan are correspondents for the Episcopal News Service. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Joseph F Foster says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bruce Bogin says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC July 3, 2013 at 9:47 pm So what’s the problem?“Dear friends in Christ,we have gathered together todayto witness N. N. and N. N. publically committing themselves to one anotherand, in the name of the Church, to bless their union:a relationship of mutual fidelity and steadfast love,forsaking all others,holding one another in tenderness and respect,in strength and bravery,as long as they live.Therefore, in the name of Christ, let us praythat they may be strengthened for the promises they make this day,and that we will have the generosityto support them in what they undertakeand the wisdom to see God at work in their life together.” July 2, 2013 at 12:47 am According to the Catechism of the Episcopal Church:Q. What is Holy Matrimony?A. Holy Matrimony is Christian marriage, in which the woman and man enter into a life-long union, … (1979 BCP, 861)“In those days Israel had no king, so the people did whatever seemed right in their own eyes.” (Judges 21:25) Rector Collierville, TN George Elliot says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS July 3, 2013 at 12:23 pm For my part I have no fear about the Republic because God has granted governments to rise and fall and not one has ever lasted intact. We’ll enjoy the blessings of a republic and liberty through a time that God allows. I am more concerned – fearful even – that too many decisions are being made on this and other issues based on human reason and a sense of perceived fairness to the total exclusion of Jesus’ plain reiteration about what marriage actually is. For those who wish to consult the Lord, please refer to Matthew 19 where Christ himself quotes Genesis 2. After reading those passages the Church has no permission whatsoever by Christ to change the design of marriage – unless human reason matters more – and it seems to. For that, I not only fear but tremble for the blasphemy. July 3, 2013 at 11:45 am Minnesota is on the North Coast. This has largely been led by littoral liberals. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Reverend Susan Russell says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virginia Saawin says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Julian Malakar says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Elizabeth Snelson says: July 1, 2013 at 8:24 pm And here at All Saints Church in Pasadena we’re in the middle of a building campaign because we need MORE space for our children, youth and families ministry — and just yesterday we welcomed 38 new members (and baptized one adult!) as we ended our Spring New Member class. We are proudly continuing to support Family Values that value ALL families and are part of a Protect Marriage Movement that protects all marriages. Thanks for this great celebratory look at how far we’ve come on the journey toward the full inclusion of all the baptized in all the sacraments … it is good to be an Episcopalian! Susan Pederson says: Rector Albany, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Rev. Paula M. Jackson says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 last_img read more

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Sudanese diaspora longs for lasting peace in homeland

first_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Yazmine Casini says: Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Sudan & South Sudan Kaya Duran says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Belleville, IL May 27, 2014 at 4:53 pm Today I have met Gabriel. Angelina was supposed to come also but her husband passed away. Hearing about there story’s is very sad. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York May 27, 2014 at 4:57 pm I am really sorry about your lost. He is still with you in your heart. I hope you feel better. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 By Matthew DaviesPosted May 16, 2014 Africa, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA center_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA South Sudanese flee an attack on the South Sudanese town of Renk, arrive at a border gate in Joda, along the Sudanese border, April 18. Photo: Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/ReutersFurther ENS coverage on South Sudan, including recent video interviews with Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, is available here.[Episcopal News Service] Almost three months have passed since Sudanese Angelina Rambang last heard from her husband. He’d been working with a bank in Juba, South Sudan, when fighting erupted last December after President Salva Kiir accused his sacked former deputy turned rebel leader Riek Machar of plotting a coup d’état.The resulting conflict has forced some 1.5 million people to flee their homes to escape the violence, and thousands have died, a harsh reality as the Episcopal Church commemorates the Martyrs of Sudan on May 16. Kiir and Machar agreed to a truce on May 9, but fighting has continued in some parts of South Sudan and 5 million people are now in urgent need of humanitarian aid.Rambang is taking each day as it comes. But the mother of four, a member of Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in San Jose, says: “I am a Christian. I have faith in God that maybe [my husband] is hiding somewhere and maybe there will be a time he will call.”The current conflict is “devastating, inexplicable,” she said, speaking by telephone one morning from her San Jose home during a brief break between returning from the school run and heading out to classes at Mission College, where she is a pre-nursing student.“Too many people are dying, suffering,” she said of her East African homeland. “It must come to an end.”Gabriel Tor, also a member of the Sudanese diaspora living in the U.S., describes the conflict in similar terms. “It’s needless, heartbreaking,” he told ENS during a recent telephone interview.[ooyala code=”FxbDF2bTow_-C_ofdQMOCj8DvyeraYBp” player_id=”d4a5625b85af485eb1fff640076c5be6″]After South Sudan separated from the Islamic north following decades of civil war and as the result of a 2011 independence referendum, “we had high hopes that we were going to be peaceful, a better economy, modernizing ourselves and building the civilization that we have missed for years,” said Tor, also a member of Trinity Cathedral in the Episcopal Diocese of El Camino Real.Tor was five years old in 1987 when he and his elder brother fled to Ethiopia to escape Sudan’s civil war. Four years later, they returned to their home in Twic East, Jonglei State, but within months the wrath of the Khartoum government had forced them to flee again. Months later, they reached the Kenyan border. The Red Cross came to their rescue and drove them to the Kakuma Refugee Camp where they lived for 12 years, fighting malnutrition and outbreaks of disease.“I give thanks that by the grace of God I have made it this far,” he said.Like many Sudanese currently in their 30s who moved to the U.S. as part of a resettlement program and came to be known as the Lost Boys and Girls of Sudan, Rambang and Tor share similar stories of survival; talk of their deep, unwavering faith; and dream of a lasting peace in their homeland.Rambang also left her parents at a very young age to escape the violence in southern Sudan. Like Tor and thousands of others, she walked hundreds of miles to Ethiopia, back to Sudan, and ended up at Kakuma, where she stayed for 10 years. She married her husband Joseph in 2002; they were resettled to San Jose in 2004. Many of the Lost Boys and Girls were resettled with the support of Episcopal Migration Ministries, the refugee resettlement program of the Episcopal Church.After half a century of civil war, and all of the joy and hope that accompanied a 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement and the formation of the new nation, the Sudanese diaspora has watched in shock as their homeland has been plunged back into conflict.President Kiir is from the Dinka tribe and rebel leader Machar is Nuer, representing the two main Sudanese ethnic groups, which has led to claims that the conflict is tribal.Rambang is Nuer and Tor is Dinka. Yet, like many of their fellow Sudanese, they share the same view that the current conflict stems primarily from political differences.In many places, Tor said, Nuer and Dinka “are not in conflict because they realize that the issues are mostly political … The abuse came when both men [Kiir and Machar] used their tribal names to establish their claims.”Even though there have been ethnic elements to the conflict and several instances of intertribal fighting, “it is the government and the rebels telling them to do this,” said Rambang, adding that in South Sudan, many Dinka and Nuer live peacefully and attend the same churches. “If you tie something to a rock and drag it, it will follow you. That is what the leaders are doing. They are the ones leading the killing of the people. The leaders of the country [are responsible] and they must bring this to an end.”But Tor also acknowledged that the situation is very complicated, varies from region to region, and that it is challenging for accurate information to permeate all the communities of South Sudan, as well as the rest of the world.For example, Tor said, “there are still Nuer generals standing with the army saying that this is not tribal and who some are calling traitors because they have not joined the rebellion against the government. But there are still many who are uneducated or uninformed who do not understand how this started or where it is going, and they are making it tribal.”Bul Garang Mabil agrees.“What is currently happening in South Sudan is not a tribal or ethnic issue but a failure of the post-war development programs in which tribal and ethnic affiliations have been exploited and manipulated,” said Mabil, who was resettled in 2000 to Jackson, Mississippi, after several years at Kakuma. Fourteen years later he is an active member of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral in Jackson and works for the Mississippi Department of Transportation.“What is not being reported in the media is the level of propaganda that both sides to the conflict have been using to rally or scare others into supporting their causes for the violence,” he told ENS in a recent interview.“Since Christians in the United States pressed so hard for an independent South Sudan and have spoken consistently against the actions of the Government of Sudan [in the north], we must speak with equal clarity and consistency and frequency against violence within [the] largely Christian South Sudan,” he said, underscoring the need for Americans to speak out on the issue and write to President Barack Obama and members of Congress. “To say nothing, or so say little too late, is to be complicit in evil. We must speak loudly and clearly against the killing, terror, and starvation and do what we can to nurture peace.”The Episcopal Church’s Office of Government Relations on May 16 provided a template for an advocacy letter to U.S. President Barack Obama, urging him to support peace and reconciliation in South Sudan.The Rev. Zachariah Char shortly after his ordination in 2007. Photo: Diocese of Western MichiganThe Rev. Zachariah Jok Char also moved to the U.S. in 2000 at the age of 19, after calling Kakuma his home for 13 years.He paid his way through college in Michigan, working as a dishwasher and at a meat factory, and earned a bachelor’s degree in social work and biblical studies.He now works in the refugee department at Bethany Christian Services in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and has served as pastor of the Sudanese Grace Episcopal Church in the Episcopal Diocese of Western Michigan since 2007.He was visiting South Sudan in December 2013 when the conflict erupted and was forced to abandon his mission to build a medical clinic in his home village of Duk Padiet.“When I heard the sound of guns, the night of Dec. 15, I was so sad and ashamed because I was not expecting the South Sudanese to fight one another,” he said.Before he was evacuated by the U.S. Embassy on Dec. 19, he was able to visit the hospital to donate blood for the wounded, especially the civilians, he said. He spent a week in Kenya, expecting that the fighting would cease and he’d be able to return to South Sudan. When it was clear that the war was escalating, he flew back to the U.S. on Dec. 30.Like Bul, Char holds the politicians responsible and says that the only way to ensure a lasting peace is from relentless pressure from the international community.The cover of the St. Paul’s Episcopal Church publication show the Rev. Thon Chol being ordained to the diaconate by Virginia Bishop Suffragan David JonesThe Rev. Thon Chol, deacon of the Sudanese congregation at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Alexandria, Virginia, said that the scale of human suffering and the scale of political greed among the leaders have not been sufficiently reported by the media.Chol described his congregation, which is primarily Dinka but also includes other Sudanese ethnicities, as “very inclusive. If you talk to the average Dinka or Nuer, we all have the same dreams. Our politicians are sometimes the ones who don’t get along, and when this happens they go back to their tribal affiliation [and] … brainwash people to achieve their personal goals.”The current crisis, Chol said, has taken a new emotional toll on the south Sudanese. “It was different when we were fighting the common enemy [the Khartoum government]. We thought that when we get independence everything would be OK. This latest conflict has somewhat killed our hope. We are fighting ourselves now … Right now a lot of people are very hopeless, but still as a Christian, as a pastor, I say we need to look to God. During the war God was our main protector.”Chol, who was resettled in Michigan in 2000, was an ambassador for the Partners in Peace project in 2011 that worked among several villages in Jonglei State to build a society of reconciliation.“There is a need for true reconciliation in South Sudan,” he said. “People need to talk and come to full admission and acceptance for a way to move forward. Here in the diaspora we also need reconciliation and dialogue. We need to open a new chapter.”Chol raised concerns that some of the messages and responses from the Sudanese diaspora throughout the recent conflict have not always been helpful. “We have contributed to the current problem in South Sudan because there is inconsistency in what we’ve been saying. There has been so much propaganda and lies; a lot of hateful messages, very demeaning and targeting particular tribes. So we have been trying to address that. A lot of people pick up just pieces of information.”The Rev. Ross Kane, associate rector at St. Paul’s, serves alongside Chol and says he’s heard tragic stories from members of the Sudanese congregation there, “many of whom have lost loved ones and have seen tremendous suffering.”As a former Episcopal Church missionary in South Sudan, working with the New Sudan Council of Churches, Kane wishes that the church’s work for peace and reconciliation there would get more attention. “It profoundly changed the landscape in the region and should be a source for hope in overcoming the current conflict,” he said.Episcopalians and Roman Catholics account for the vast majority of the population in South Sudan.Episcopal Archbishop Daniel Deng Bul was summoned to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to take part in the May 9 negotiations between Kiir and Machar. Deng led the two men in prayer before they signed the peace deal.Deng was appointed chairperson of the national reconciliation committee by Kiir in April 2013, a move that highlights the central role that the church plays in peacebuilding and helping to heal the mental wounds in South Sudan following decades of civil war with the Islamic north.South Sudan’s rebel leader Riek Machar (R) and South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir (L) hold Episcopal Archbishop Daniel Deng Bul’s hands as they pray before signing a peace agreement in Addis Ababa May 9. Photo: Goran Tomasevic/ReutersKane believes the path to peace can be found through the church, and in particular through the pioneering work of the New Sudan Council of Churches, an ecumenical body which facilitated grassroots peace negotiations in the 1990s, bringing together Dinka and Nuer chiefs, politicians and religious leaders in order to name past atrocities and to seek restitution.“The peace process spread across southern Sudan, building unity among southern Sudanese; such unity proved vital in ending Sudan’s civil war and in securing South Sudan’s independence,” he said.One of the challenges he senses with today’s conflict is that the government and other leaders “still behave like it’s a rebel movement, so there is a desire for wholesale political reform but no sense of how to do it without destabilizing things even more,” he said.Kane says he feels “profoundly sad to see that the people who struggled for so long to find self-determination…are now undergoing such a tragedy.”But he doesn’t lose hope. “When I see the people of South Sudan who are putting their lives on the line to accept refugees of different ethnicities in their home; when I see southern Sudanese church leaders putting their lives on the line for the sake of peace; when I see the way churches are collaborating with [tribal] chiefs and non-Christians, Muslims to try to form a peaceful movement … That is where I see God. The spirit is moving and there are witnesses for peace, but as much as they don’t make headlines, they are a major part of South Sudanese culture.”Kane describes the Sudanese as “a proud people. They are, to me, the best representation of the indomitable human spirit. They’ve lived through decades of civil war, and they do not lose hope. There is something profoundly inspiring in that to me.”Meanwhile, Rambang and Tor, Nuer and Dinka, along with their fellow Sudanese in the diaspora, continue to pray together for a lasting peace in their homeland.The Rev. Jerry Drino has dedicated the last 10 years to supporting and mentoring people like Rambang and Tor, through his ministry at Trinity Cathedral in San Jose and his education and outreach agency Hope With South Sudan. He says he has shared in their suffering, but has been inspired equally “by their resilience, faith and optimism that God had not abandoned them and that God was in their suffering, in their struggles, in their dying and in their rebirth.”“I almost have the feeling that there is no place to be overwhelmed and paralyzed by what is happening, because as long as there is the smallest sliver of light coming through the darkness, that is sufficient,” he said.Over the years, Drino says he’s “participated in the weaving of a safety net for all of us, Sudanese and others, so that when disaster hits the impact is absorbed by the whole community.“I am humbled to be a part of this community that will not be defeated, but in love look beyond the chaos to see a new society, a new church waiting to be restored and made new.”— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori has called the Episcopal Church to prayer and action for South Sudan. For further information and resources for prayer and action, visit: www.episcopalchurch.org/sudanThe U.S.-based Episcopal Church has long-standing partnerships with the Episcopal Church of Sudan and South Sudan, through companion diocese relationships, Episcopal Relief and Development (ERD) programs and the advocacy work of the Office of Government Relations.Current companion relationships include Albany (New York) with the Province of Sudan, Bethlehem (Pennsylvania) with Kajo Keji, Chicago with Renk, Indianapolis with Bor, Missouri with Lui, Rhode Island with Ezo, Southwestern Virginia with the Province of Sudan, and Virginia with the Province of Sudan.Partnerships also exist through various networks such as the American Friends of the Episcopal Church of Sudan and Hope With South Sudan. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (3) Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Jerry Drino says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing May 17, 2014 at 9:30 am Matt, thank your for bringing voices from the South Sudanese Diaspora to this observance of a Day of Prayer for Peace in South Sudan. These courageous young people are in our midst, a witness to the presence of God in their suffering and the suffering of their people. Your piece allows us to know them more closely. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Sudanese diaspora longs for lasting peace in homeland Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Comments are closed. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

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