Farmingdale State College Opens New Campus Center

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Local politicians and school officials cut the ribbon during the grand opening of Farmingdale State College’s new Campus Center.Ram-Bo, the spirited mascot of Farmingdale State College, stood at a podium Friday inside its new campus center and victoriously raised his arms in the air welcoming spectators into his new home.Local officials, students, professors and members of the community responded by lifting their cell phones and snapping photos. Others offered friendly waves and smiles.Then it was onto the main event—the official grand opening of  its new, modern, 50,000-square foot academic building, which boasts state-of-the-art dining facilities, a bookstore and lectures ballroom, all in one centralized location.“It’s a historic event in a number of different ways,” said Farmingdale State College President Hubert Keen, standing underneath an oculus that bathed visitors in sunlight.“Buildings don’t come alive until people come in and then work in them,” he added.Students wasted little time breaking in the new academic digs—the first one of its kind since 1983—touring the facilities, planting laptops atop tables and of course, caffeinating themselves.Farmingdale State College’s new Campus CenterKeen was joined by State Sen. Charles Fuschillo (R-Merrick), Assemblyman Robert Sweeney (D-Lindenhurst) and Assemblyman Chad Lupinacci (R-Huntington Station), a former adjunct professor at Farmingdale.“You are forcing me to spend more time here with a campus center like this,” Fuschillo told the crowd, noting that he has a satellite office on campus.“This is the identity that Farmingdale State College should have,” he added.School officials hope students will embrace the campus center as a one-stop hub for their daily activities. The $25 million complex is part of the college’s $185 million renovation and construction plan, which includes a School of Business Building, a Children’s Center for students and faculty, and renovations to help better accommodate its growing student population, officials said.“Farmingdale State College could not have asked for a better addition to campus life,” said Student Government Association President Amanda Lundberg.The building “befits a thriving, growing college campus,” added Sweeney.The new facility’s ballroom will have a capacity of 400 to host a variety of lectures and events, the college said, and accommodates 220 for dining-style seating.last_img read more

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Byron Scott hopes Lakers’ Nick Young more than ‘one-trick pony’

first_imgYoung may have shot 2 of 8 in the second half. But he looked more engaged and hustled for loose balls. “Obviously they brought me here to put the ball in the hole,” said Young, who signed with the Lakers this offseason to a four-year deal worth $21.5 million. “But I’ve got to learn the ins and outs. We’ve all got to be dogs out there and howling at the moon.”Young used an interesting analogy in describing a more rugged and physical game. But it appears Young has finally grasped Scott’s message. After all, the Lakers’ coach expressed uncertainty how Young would fit in his system if he failed to round out his game. “We have the rest of the year to figure it out and three years left on his contract. He has to figure that out,” Scott said. “That’s something we’ve talked about at length and something I expect.” Scott hardly expects Young to become a facilitator after averaging only 0.9 assists all season. Young will still celebrate after he makes shots, hunching over and throwing down three fingers from each hand after he makes a 3-pointer. But Scott argued Young can shoot around 47 percent if he changes how he scores. “He takes very tough shots. He settles sometimes for the jump shot and has to mix the game up,” Scott said. “He can’t be all just about trying to beat your guy off the dribble. Sometimes you have to catch-and-shoot and catch-and-drive. You have to keep guys off-balance as much as possible.”Young vowed he will do that.“I’ll just keep going,” Young said. “I got to eat my bowl of Wheaties and keep going out there.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorcenter_img ORLANDO — In what marked an uncomfortable living arrangement in recent weeks, Nick Young finally escaped Byron Scott’s doghouse.Both Young and Scott moved on from a second-half benching two weeks ago over questionable effort by Young. They talked things over about Young’s recent frustration over sitting in Sunday’s loss to New York while healing from a sprained right ankle. But as Young sounds eager to start a new month after shooting a career-low 32 percent in January, Scott continues to prod his charismatic forward into offering something more than acrobatic shots. “You can’t be a one-trick pony,” Scott said. “You have to play on both ends of the floor and he can be a much better basketball player than what he is on both ends. He’s shown he can play defense when he wants to. It’s just all the little things.”When the Lakers (13-36) visit the Orlando Magic (15-37) on Friday at Amway Center, it will mark Young’s second game since missing the previous 10 because of his aforementioned injury. It will also reveal whether he can build off of the Lakers’ overtime loss to Milwaukee on Wednesday, in which he posted 16 points on 5-of-12 shooting and three rebounds in 33 minutes off the bench.last_img read more

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Fed expected to slash interest rates

first_imgWASHINGTON – For the first time in more than four years, the Federal Reserve appears ready to lower interest rates to prevent a housing meltdown and a painful credit crunch from driving the economy into a recession. A rate cut would affect millions of borrowers, with the intention of getting them to spend and invest more, which would revitalize the economy. In one of their most important and anxiously awaited decisions, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and his central bank colleagues meet Tuesday to determine their next move on interest rates. Those policymakers are widely expected to cut an important rate, now at 5.25 percent, by at least one-quarter of percentage point. Some analysts predict a bolder step, a half-point reduction. If the Fed drops the rate, then the prime lending rate that commercial banks charge many individuals and businesses would fall by a corresponding amount. It now is at 8.25 percent. Less immediate would be relief for the country’s economic health. An expected series of rate decreases could take three months to nine months before rippling through the economy and bolstering activity. “It’s like taking an antibiotic. After you take the first dose, you don’t feel immediately better. But after a series of dosages accumulate, there will be a more positive effect,” explained Stuart Hoffman, chief economist at PNC Financial Services Group. Over the short term, a rate cut would provide an important psychological boost. It could make investors, businesses and others less inclined to clamp down or make drastic changes in their behavior that would hurt the economy. Fears that the deepening housing slump and a spreading credit crisis could short-circuit the six-year-old economic expansion have shaken Wall Street over the past few months. Stocks have swung wildly, with sharp drops reflecting investors’ bouts of panic. A recent government report showing that the economy lost jobs for the first time in four years delivered a fresh jolt. The biggest fear is that individuals and businesses will cut back on spending, throwing the economy into a tailspin. By Zandi’s odds, there now is a 40 percent chance the economy will fall into a recession – the highest probability since the last recession, in 2001. Just two months earlier, Zandi believed there was only a 12 percent chance. So far, though, consumers have not cracked. Retail sales rose a modest 0.3 percent in August, after a 0.5 percent gain in July, the government reported Friday.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “It’s no longer a debate over whether they will ease but by how much,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Economy.com. “The economy is soft and getting softer,” and the Fed has come under economic and political pressure to act. Should the Fed go with a quarter-point cut, analysts expect policymakers will lower the rate again in October and in December, their final meeting of the year. Fed action would mean that borrowers who can obtain credit would see rates drop on a variety of loans. It would become less expensive for people to finance certain credit card debt and for homeowners to take out popular home equity lines of credit, which often are used to pay for education, home improvements or medical bills. Also, it should help some homeowners whose adjustable-rate mortgages reset in the fall. “Borrowers facing a rate reset Oct. 1 might see their ARM rates adjust to 6.7 percent, for example, rather than the 7.5 percent that a borrower whose loan adjusted back on July 1 experienced,” said Greg McBride, senior financial analyst for Bankrate.com. “Still a big increase, but not the knockout punch it could have been,” he said. last_img read more

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