Jimmy Garoppolo struggles in first game since ACL injury, finishes with 0 passing yards

first_img“Hopefully you don’t have five in the game, but you can play yourself out of two in a row or something like that.”These stories are often overblown this time of year, when we’ve been starved of football for so long and raring to get the regular season underway.San Francisco faces the Buccaneers in Week 1, which will provide a more accurate test of Garoppolo’s progress. The fifth-year quarterback’s first drive ended with a pick after he was pressured by Bradley Chubb and threw up a hopeful pass that found Denver cornerback Isaac Yiadom Jr.Pressure from @astronaut ✅Interception from @isaacshowtime ✅We 👀 you, 2018 #BroncosDraft class! pic.twitter.com/Z2hOFIdmjR— Denver Broncos (@Broncos) August 20, 2019Things didn’t get much better for Garoppolo from there. He narrowly avoided a pick-six on the next drive when he hit a Broncos player between the numbers, but the pass bounced safely away.MORE: Melvin Gordon ‘just waiting on the call’ as holdout continuesWhile Garoppolo eventually got his first completion on the 49ers’ third drive, Matt Breida was stuffed before getting back to the line of scrimmage.The obvious caveat of ‘it’s only preseason’ must be emphasized here, but Garoppolo could do with some good press right now. The 27-year-old made headlines after throwing five straight picks in practice last week.49ers head coach Kyle Shanahan didn’t sound concerned about that practice performance at the time.”You hope to never have a day like that, but I don’t think it’s never not happened to anyone,” Shanahan told reporters.  Jimmy Garoppolo struggled in his first game action since injuring his ACL last season, throwing an interception and failing to move the ball against the Broncos defense.Garoppolo left the game after three drives with a grim statline: 1-of-6 passing for 0 yards, with one interception and a 0.0 passer rating. last_img read more

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Fantasy Injury Updates: Is T.Y. Hilton playing Monday night? (Updated)

first_imgT.Y. Hilton is officially questionable for Monday Night Football for the Colts against the Saints. He’s missed Indianapolis’ past two games because of a calf injury and will be a game-time decision. If he plays, he’s a solid boom-or-bust fantasy option, but you’ll want to back him up with Zach Pascal or Marcus Johnson if you’re waiting out the updates and hoping for him to be active.The official active/inactive report drops about 6:50 p.m. ET, and we’ll have updates through that time here and on Twitter @SN_Fantasy. WEEK 16 NON-PPR RANKINGS:Quarterback | Running back | Wide receiver | Tight end | D/ST | KickerIs T.Y. Hilton playing Monday night?UPDATE 2: Hilton is officially ACTIVE. UPDATE: Hilton is “trending in the right direction”, according to NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport. Hilton hasn’t played in the past two weeks. He returned in Week 12 after a separate multi-week absence for the same calf injury, but he apparently aggravated the injury and has now missed Weeks 13 and 14. Hilton was limited in practice Friday before missing Saturday’s practice, which could be a precaution but could also be a bad sign. MORE MNF: DraftKings showdown lineup | Betting previewIndianapolis head coach Frank Reich confirmed Saturday that Hilton will be a true game-time decision for Monday night. Reich added that if Hilton played, there wouldn’t be a pitch count on his playing time.Because Hilton runs the risk of aggravating the injury again if he plays, he’s not without risk, but if you own him and can afford to wait on him, he’s still a solid play against an overrated Saints pass defense. If Hilton is out, Zach Pascal moves up to No. 1 WR duties while Marcus Johnson joins him in two-wide sets. Pascal would be the preferred play of the two, but he may be owned in your league, and Johnson is the next best option to pick up off waivers if you need a backup while you wait on Hilton.last_img read more

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Listless and lonely in Puerto Rico some older storm survivors consider suicide

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. May 10 2018A social worker, Lisel Vargas, recently visited Don Gregorio at his storm-damaged home in the steep hillsides of Humacao, a city on Puerto Rico’s eastern coast near where Category 4 Hurricane Maria first made landfall last September.Gregorio, a 62-year-old former carpenter who lives alone, looked haggard. He said he had stopped taking his medication for depression more than a week earlier and hadn’t slept in four days. He was feeling anxious and nervous, he said, rubbing his bald head and fidgeting with the silver watch on his wrist. His voice monotone and barely audible, he told Vargas he had had thoughts of suicide.Indeed, the overall suicide rate in Puerto Rico increased 29 percent in 2017, with a significant jump after Hurricane Maria, the Puerto Rico Department of Public Health reports, and that anguish is continuing.Gregorio’s descent from heartbroken but determined storm victim to this moment of despair is a path traveled by many older people here in Puerto Rico. Psychologists and social workers, like Vargas, say elderly people are especially vulnerable when their daily routines are disrupted for long periods. Those who were once active, she said, now stay home alone.”Before, they used to watch television, they would watch their novellas, hear the radio,” said Vargas. That predictability of TV shows and church groups or seeing friends regularly imbues life with meaning and order. “Because they feel depressed, they don’t have that desire to keep that routine of sharing in the community,” she said.In the weeks following the late September storm, Gregorio said, he cried all day, every day.Then, he got to work, clearing the broken branches and helping his neighbors.But as the months wore on and his church — the organizing force of his day — remained closed, his regular church groups couldn’t meet and many of the people he saw every day moved to the United States. He went six months without electricity and missed the nightly routine of watching the local news. Now, he said, he feels listless and forlorn.”I can’t do anything. Like about two months that I haven’t been able to do anything,” he said. “I’m not motivated.”Related StoriesSome children are at greater risk of ongoing depression long after being bulliedScientists describe microbiome composition in patients suffering from IBD and PSCWeighing risks and benefits of antidepressant medication for older adultsSo he sits, much of the day, along the driveway. He reads his Bible and prepares canned food for dinner and goes to bed early.”We have elderly people who live alone, with no power, no water and very little food,” said Adrian Gonzalez, chief operating officer at Castañer General Hospital in Castañer, a small town in the island’s central mountains. The loss of routine has created widespread anxiety among the elderly, he said. “We have two in-house psychologists and right now their [schedules are] packed.”Dr. Angel Munoz, a clinical psychologist in Ponce, said people who care for older adults need to be trained to identify the warning signs of suicide.”Many of these elderly people either live alone or are being taken care of by neighbors,” said Munoz. “They are not even relatives.”Back in Humacao, the church has tried to bring back its slate of activities, but Don Gregorio said he often doesn’t feel like going. Many of the people he once spent time with left Puerto Rico after the storm.Standing on the hillside behind his house and surveying his banana and breadfruit trees that are regrowing, Gregorio said, “I would like to leave too. I pray that God can take me out of this house because I’ve lived in the same place for 62 years.”He recently called his sister in Jacksonville, Fla., and asked if he could move in with her. “She said, ‘No, you can’t live with me,’” he said, tearing up.KHN’s coverage related to aging and improving care of older adults is supported in part by The John A. Hartford Foundation.last_img read more

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