Sangakkara to retire at end of county championship

first_img(REUTERS) – Former Sri Lanka captain Kumar Sangakkara will retire from first-class cricket in September at the end of England’s county championship season.The Surrey batsman, who quit Test cricket in 2015 with 12 400 runs, is fifth on the all-time list of Test run-scorers, averaging 57.40 in 134 Tests.“You try to fight the inevitable but you need to get out while you’re ahead,” the 39-year-old told the BBC on Monday.“It’s the last time I’ll play a four-day game here. I’ll be 40 in a few months, this is about the end of my time in county cricket.”As well as his Test exploits, Sangakkara has been one of the game’s great limited overs batsmen and was part of the Sri Lanka team that reached the 2007 and 2011 World Cup finals, although they lost to Australia and India respectively.His Twenty20 commitments will take him through to 2018, but his time in the longer format is almost over.“My career might have a few more months (left) but that’s about it,” he added.Having joined Surrey for the 2015 season, Sangakkara is still in good form. He scored over 1 000 first-class runs last term and hit two centuries against Middlesex at the weekend but felt it was still time to walk away.“The biggest mistake that sometimes you can make is that you think you’re better than you really are,” he said.“Cricketers, or any sort of sportsperson, have an expiry date and you need to walk away.“I have been very lucky to play for as long as I did, but there’s a lot more life to be lived away from the game.”last_img read more

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FDA approves marketing of brainsway deep transcranial magnetic stimulation system for OCD

first_imgAug 17 2018Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration permitted marketing of the Brainsway Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation System for treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD).”Transcranial magnetic stimulation has shown its potential to help patients suffering from depression and headaches,” said Carlos Peña, Ph.D., M.S., director of the Division of Neurological and Physical Medicine Devices in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “With today’s marketing authorization, patients with OCD who have not responded to traditional treatments now have another option.”OCD is a common, chronic and long-lasting disorder in which a person has uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts and behaviors that a person feels the urge to repeat over and over. OCD is typically treated with medication, psychotherapy or a combination of the two. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, about 1 percent of U.S. adults had OCD in the past year. Although most patients with OCD respond to treatment, some patients continue to experience symptoms.Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a procedure that uses magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. The FDA permitted marketing of TMS as a treatment for major depression in 2008 and expanded the use to include TMS for treating pain associated with certain migraine headaches in 2013.The FDA reviewed data from a randomized, multi-center study of 100 patients, of which 49 patients received treatment with the Brainsway device and 51 received treatment with a non-working (sham) device. Patients already receiving OCD treatments (medical management) were maintained at their current dosages throughout the study. The study evaluated the reduction in patients’ Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS) score, a common metric for measuring the severity of a patient’s OCD. The results indicated that 38 percent of patients responded to the Brainsway device (i.e., greater than 30 percent reduction in YBOCS score), whereas 11 percent of patients responded when using the sham device.Related StoriesWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaPerinatal depression screenings may overlook women having suicidal ideationThe most frequent adverse reaction was headache reported by 37.5 percent of the patients who received the Brainsway device and by 35.3 percent of the patients who received the sham treatment. No serious adverse reactions related to the Brainsway device were reported. Other adverse reactions, such as application site pain or discomfort, jaw pain, facial pain, muscle pain, spasm or twitching, and neck pain, were reported as either mild or moderate and resolved shortly after treatment.The Brainsway device is contraindicated for patients with metallic objects or implanted stimulator devices in or near the head, including cochlear implants, deep brain stimulators, vagus nerve stimulators, other implanted electrodes or stimulators, aneurysm clips or coils, stents, bullet fragments, jewelry and hair barrettes. During treatment with the device, the patient must use earplugs to reduce exposure to the loud sounds produced by the device. Patients with a history of seizures should discuss their history with their health care provider before receiving the device.The FDA reviewed the Brainsway device through the de novo premarket review pathway, a regulatory pathway for some low- to moderate-risk devices that are novel and for which there is no legally marketed predicate device to which the device can claim substantial equivalence.The FDA permitted marketing of the Brainsway device to Brainways Ltd.Source: https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm617244.htmlast_img read more

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