‘CureStigma’ theme for annual Mental Illness Awareness Week

first_imgLawrenceburg, In. — Community Mental Health Center, Inc., Lawrenceburg, other mental health providers, and advocates for mental health care throughout the United States are continuing to work together with hundreds of thousands of Americans to support mental health care services and to provide education about mental illnesses.This mission is highlighted during national Mental Illness Awareness Week, celebrated October 7 through October 13 this year. “CureStigma” is the theme for this year’s event. The event focuses on raising awareness of mental illnesses and their impact on individuals, families and society in general, and on replacing stigma surrounding mental illness with hope for treatment and recovery. This is an opportunity to fight stigma, to provide support, to educate the public, and to continue to advocate for equal care.Mental Illness Awareness Week was established by Congress in 1990 in recognition of the efforts of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) to raise mental illness awareness. NAMI has chapters in every state in the nation and is active in advocating for the rights of individuals with mental illnesses and lobbying for improved services.Mental Illness Awareness Week raises public awareness about mental illness. NAMI hopes everyone will talk about mental health and share what they know and what they learn with family, friends and others. This is also a time to free everyone from stereotypes that too often discourage people from getting help when they need it. There is hope for renewal and recovery. We can all make a difference in the lives of family, friends and others who experience mental illness.One in five adults experiences mental illness problems every year. “Stigma is toxic to their mental health because it creates an environment of shame, fear and silence that prevents many people from seeking help and treatment. The perception of mental illness won’t change unless we act to change it,” says NAMI.Although many people today understand mental illness is a medical condition, individuals and families affected by mental illness are still often subjected to stigma and discrimination. Common and well-known mental illnesses include depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Other types of mental illness include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and anxiety disorders (including post-traumatic stress disorder).“We are calling on everyone to join with CMHC and NAMI to replace stigma with hope by seeking to CureStigma” said Tom Talbot, Executive Director of Community Mental Health Center, Inc.“We know that recovery is possible. Treatment works, and the sooner one can become engaged in treatment, the better,” said Mr. Talbot.Unfortunately, there can be long delays – sometimes decades – between the first appearance of symptoms and when people get help. Less than one-third of adults and less than one-half of children with a diagnosed illness receive treatment. You are never alone. Know where to find help when it is needed. Many people begin with their primary care doctor. Many start by confiding in a close family member or friend. Don’t be afraid to speak up.CMHC, Inc. served more than 5,000 people during State Fiscal Year 2018 (July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018). CMHC provides comprehensive behavioral health services (mental health and substance use disorders treatment services) to individuals of all ages in Dearborn, Franklin, Ohio, Ripley and Switzerland counties.Early identification and treatment is vital – by getting individuals the treatment they need early, recovery is accelerated and the brain is protected from further harm related to the course of illness. The best treatments for serious mental illnesses today are highly effective – between 70 and 90 percent of individuals have significant reduction of symptoms and improved quality of life with a combination of medication and psychosocial treatments and supports. The economic cost of untreated mental illnesses is about $200 billion each year in the United States.For more information about services offered by Community Mental Health Center, Inc., please call (812) 537-1302 for the location of an office near you, or visit CMHC’s website at www.cmhcinc.org for more information.All services of Community Mental Health Center, Inc. are provided without regard to race, religion, disability, gender, color, age, national origin, ancestry, ethnicity, sexual orientation, political belief, status as a veteran, or any other characteristic protected by federal, state or local law.last_img read more

Read More →

Other Sports Two US athletes stage protest over President Donald Trump’s policies, face warning

first_imghighlights For all the Latest Sports News News, Other Sports News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. Lima: Two US athletes who staged podium protests at the recent Pan American Games have been reprimanded but will not face further punishment by United States Olympic chiefs, USA Today reported on Wednesday. Fencer Race Imboden and hammer thrower Gwen Berry both came under fire after protesting the policies of President Donald Trump as they collected medals in Lima. Imboden took a knee during the playing of the US national anthem while Berry raised a clenched fist before later calling out social injustice “and a president who’s making it worse.” The United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee later issued a statement expressing “disappointment” at the athlete protests, warning it was reviewing what action to take.USA Today reported on Wednesday that USOPC chief Sarah Hirshland had taken a conciliatory tone in letters sent to Imboden and Berry. However, while Hirshland said she admired each athlete’s decision “to be an active citizen”, she warned that they could face serious sanctions if there was any repeat in the next 12 months — a period covering next year’s 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. Notifying the athletes that they faced “a probationary period for the next 12 months,” Hirshland said: “This means you could face more serious sanctions for any additional breach of our code of conduct than might otherwise be levied for an athlete in good standing.” Hirshland said US Olympic officials would work with the International Olympic Committee and International Paralympic Committee and athletes to “more clearly define for Team USA athletes what a breach of these rules will mean in the future.”  ‘Fundamental freedom’ Trump has clashed repeatedly with professional athletes who have protested against racial injustice in the United States, accusing NFL players who kneeled during the national anthem of being unpatriotic. Several championship-winning sports teams meanwhile have refused to attend White House receptions since Trump’s election.During the recent FIFA Women’s World Cup, Trump clashed with star US forward Megan Rapinoe, who had said she would boycott any White House event. The prospect of US athletes protesting against Trump at next year’s Olympics could potentially lead to sanctions by the IOC, whose charter forbids any “demonstration or political, religious or racial propaganda” in Olympic arenas. Hirshland said while she supported the athletes’ right to protest, she disagreed with the timing and venue of their activism. “I applaud your decision to be an active citizen,” Hirshland said. “It is admirable. Regardless of one’s viewpoint, it is a fundamental freedom and important obligation that we each hold to participate actively in the pursuit of a better country and a better world. While I respect your perspective — and that of every athlete for whom I’m lucky enough to serve — I disagree with the moment and manner in which you chose to express your views. The rules we operate under as members of Team USA exist for important reasons. A prohibition on political protest is not intended to silence important voices. In fact, I am genuinely committed to helping identify better avenues for athletes to make their voices heard.”center_img Both athletes could face serious sanctions if there was any repeat in the next 12 months.Race Imboden took a knee during the playing of the US national anthem.Gwen Berry raised a clenched fist before later calling out social injustice.last_img read more

Read More →