Badgers head west for border battle

first_imgView Gallery (2 Photos)Jill Gardiner has some decisions to make this weekend.One of her sons, Jake Gardiner, a defenseman on the Wisconsin men’s hockey team, is heading up to Minneapolis this weekend to play the Minnesota Golden Gophers, which has been a standard occurrence over Gardiner’s three years at UW. This year, though, Jake’s younger brother Max is a freshman forward on the Minnesota team.So does Jill create one of those half-and-half jerseys, or just switch for each game? Maybe she just plays favorites?Jake doesn’t know. He is, however, looking forward to playing his brother, and the two have scouted each others’ teams a bit. He’s not giving away too much, though.“We’re not giving any systems or anything, but telling him how our forwards are and our D,” Gardiner said with a laugh.The Badgers’ (5-2-1, 2-1-1 WCHA) trip to Minnesota (5-3-0, 3-3 WCHA) will be a homecoming for more than just Gardiner, however. As usual, the UW roster has its share of Minnesotans, including three freshmen.One of those rookies, defenseman Joe Faust, didn’t face any shock at donning the red in this series.“I was never a huge Gopher fan growing up, I was more just a hockey fan,” Faust said.Even UW’s native Wisconsinites have Minnesota connections, as senior forward Podge Turnbull played two years at Duluth East High School before playing junior hockey. As with most of the Minnesota-Wisconsin matchups in any sport, the intensity level is high, especially with so many of the players on each team knowing guys on the other.“Going in, there is always a personal contest with guys. And the Wisconsin-Minnesota pride thing, who’s better, who’s not,” Turnbull said. “It’s actually a lot of fun, you see a lot of higher tempo, bigger hits, because everyone’s playing that much harder for pride for Wisconsin.”With big rivalries come big emotions, and in hockey, that sometimes translates into unnecessary penalties. The Badgers took three unsportsmanlike conduct penalties last Saturday against Michigan Tech, resulting in the Badgers going down a man each time. And although UW is a young team, the guilty Badger in each of two of those calls was a senior.Wisconsin escaped that game giving up just one power-play goal in six MTU power plays, but head coach Mike Eaves was less than thrilled with the scraps after the whistle. The team is well aware of the need to stay levelheaded.“Emotions run high in games like this,” Turnbull said. “I definitely feel like our talk all week within the locker room has been, let’s keep our emotions in check; let’s play smart, play whistle to whistle. Let’s goad them into doing the stuff after the whistle and we’ll take the power plays.”If Wisconsin can draw calls and get on the power play, it will send out the nation’s third-best unit. UW converts on 31.1 percent of its chances on the man-advantage and is second in Division I with 14 power play goals.That doesn’t bode especially well for Minnesota, which is just 38th in the country with a 78.4 percent penalty kill.“We just have so many options, we have so much firepower on our power play. We can do a lot of things with that,” Gardiner said.Five Badgers have at least two power-play goals, and it’s no coincidence the first-unit power play makes up five of UW’s top six scorers.The silver lining in taking all the penalties last weekend was the Badgers got to see how well their penalty kill could play. The Huskies came into Madison with a 37 percent conversion rate with the man-advantage and left with a 30.6 percent mark.“Our forwards are doing a great job blocking shots, that’s definitely one of our biggest things,” Gardiner said of the UW penalty kill. “Our defense, positionally, they’re doing well, getting pucks down ice and wasting time on the penalty kill is huge.”All told, Wisconsin scores more (just barely, 4.25 goals to 4.12) and allows fewer goals (1.88 to 3.48) per game than Minnesota. Those numbers can be taken with a grain of salt, sometimes, in border battle games. Last season, Wisconsin split the four games it played with Minnesota, although nobody would say the two teams matched up evenly.In terms of other moves, Eaves is throwing one major changeup in his defensive pairings, putting Gardiner and sophomore Justin Schultz together. The two defensemen play together on the power play and Eaves was interested to see how the two would fare over the course of a full game.That leaves UW mixing two experienced guys in sophomore John Ramage and senior Craig Johnson with Faust and freshman Frankie Simonelli. Eaves said the two freshmen may play together on some shifts, depending on how things play out.Rivalry aside, Eaves still thinks the Badgers need to decide what kind of team they will be. Both teams are coming off sweeps, UW over Michigan Tech and UM going out to Colorado College and leaving with four points.The Badgers struggled in their only other road trip, a loss and tie at Denver. Eaves would like his young team to even out its course between now and Christmas.“The number one thing is to see consistency,” he said. “With a young team, we’re going to see brilliant moments and we’re going to see moments where we absolutely want to pull our hair out. And we’ve had those moments already.”last_img read more

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Jim Boeheim talks Syracuse hoops, college basketball rules ahead of 2018 season

first_img Published on October 8, 2018 at 9:59 pm Contact Matthew: [email protected] | @MatthewGut21 Early impressions of the lineupWhen asked about Syracuse sophomore forward Oshae Brissett, Boeheim did not indicate how the freshman star from a season ago had improved this offseason.“I haven’t seen him,” Boeheim said. “He hasn’t worked out, so we’ll see what happens when he’s back at practice.”Freshman guard Jalen Carey is efficient with the ball, Boeheim said, and the returning guards Oshae Brissett and Frank Howard will be “as important this year as they were last year.”Transfer Elijah Hughes should provide depth and offense at the forward position, Boeheim said. Hughes can shoot and pose as a 6-foot-6 matchup nightmare, especially in tandem with sophomore forwards Marek Dolezaj and Brissett. Boeheim also said sophomore forward Bourama Sidibe “wasn’t healthy last year. We think he’ll be healthy. Paschal (Chukwu) is healthier. He was not 100 percent last year.”Lessen the expectationBoeheim’s message to fans: Don’t get overly excited. Yes, Syracuse returns all five starters and could earn a Top 25 ranking early in the season. But SU’s offense struggled throughout the 2017-18 season, and Boeheim doesn’t equate returning starters with success.“Everybody has to get better, otherwise we won’t win many games this year, because we didn’t win many last year,” Boeheim said. “Everybody on our team has to get better. The fact that we have everybody coming back doesn’t matter if they’re the same players as they were last year, because we didn’t win many games last year. We weren’t very good. We played good at the end, but that’s just part of the season. We were not good during the regular season last year.“If we improve, we have a chance to be a better team,” he added. “That’s still a question mark.”Jim and Juli Boeheim will divide their children’s gamesFor years, Boeheim and his wife of 21 years, Juli, could watch many of their children’s games. The kids attended Jamesville-DeWitt High School.This season, three of Boeheim’s children will play college hoops: his daughter, Jamie, at the University of Rochester; older son, Jimmy, at Cornell; and younger son, Buddy, for Syracuse. Last season, Jim and Juli made a few trips to see Jimmy’s Cornell games. They routinely met for dinner on Sunday evenings in Ithaca.But this year, it may be slightly more challenging to see as many games.“Jimmy plays Fridays and Saturdays, so Juli or I will try to get down there to see him when we can,” Boeheim said. “Sissy (Jamie Rochester) will play Friday and Sunday, so we’ll see her Sunday games as much as we can.” Ahead of the 2018-19 season, The Daily Orange sat down with SU head coach Jim Boeheim to discuss the upcoming campaign, his personnel and the new college basketball rules. Boeheim enters his 43rd season at the helm of his alma mater. The Orange, who have held practice for the past two weeks, tip off the season Nov. 6 against Eastern Washington in the Carrier Dome.Here are a few highlights from the conversation.Eric Devendorf’s position probably won’t be filledOn Sept. 6, Eric Devendorf announced he left Syracuse to be special assistant to head coach Mike Davis at Detroit Mercy. Devendorf had rejoined the Orange in 2016 as assistant strength coach after playing for  Syracuse from 2005-09: He ranks 14th on the school’s all-time scoring list, with 1,680 points, and he averaged 14.5 points across 116 career games.Aside from his strength responsibilities, Devendorf offered players tips and was “like a big brother,” senior point guard Frank Howard said at the end of last season.“We won’t probably fill that,” Boeheim said of Devendorf’s position. “We had that role to help him get started in coaching. He was good to be around the players, his attitude, personality. We’ve got really good young coaches who are really good at what they do.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBoeheim said he wishes, like several other Division I coaches, that the NCAA had passed a rule allowing for lower-level staff members — such as the director of operations or strength coaches — to conduct on-court drills. As the rule currently stands, Syracuse’s director of operations Kip Wellman is not allowed to be involved in practice.“It would have been good if they had passed that rule,” Boeheim said. “I would have gotten more money for Eric if we had passed that rule, where he could have gone on the court. They should have passed that rule. I don’t know why they didn’t.“I think they’ll pass that rule eventually, so that those guys can get on the court. Kip would be able to. It would be two guys. Generally the operations guys, could be the strength guy.”Boeheim hopes the rule will be passed because it would, more than anything, allow staff members like Wellman or Devendorf to gain more on-court experience. Wellman wants to be a coach someday. With on-court experience, Wellman would have a more attractive resume, should he apply for a full-time assistant job, Boeheim said.“That would help him get a job,” Boeheim said. “That’s the beauty of being on the court.”The new NCAA rules may not be all that effectiveIn August, a set of new rules set out to give more freedom to athletes. The NCAA Board of Governors released the array of new rules in response to the recommendations of the Commission on College Basketball, or “Rice Commission” — which spawned from the 2017 FBI investigation into corruption in college hoops, to investigate the causes of the corruption and offer recommendations to fix it.Boeheim responded to the new rules with a focus on the NBA Draft front. The new rules allow players to stay in the draft, and if they aren’t picked, return to school.“These things are all good intentions,” Boeheim said. “There were five guys who didn’t get drafted last year. They were not coming back. They’d already signed, sealed, gone. They’re not going to come back. The only thing they could do, they have to be in the combine. With this new rule, anyone could go to the combine. Why wouldn’t Marek (Dolezaj) and all these guys go ahead? You have 10 guys and five of them might not come back in June or July? What are you going to do then?“You do have to make the combine, so it limits that somewhat,” Boeheim added. “Still, I don’t think those guys would come back. So not sure the rule will do much.”As for the current one-and-done rule, Boeheim has repeatedly spoken against it. He believes “it would be good if (players) can stay in college for three years, but that will never happen. It would help everybody. Teams would be better. It would help the players develop.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo was ready to fight Blake Griffin during fiery clash vs. Pistons

first_img“I was on the floor, I didn’t see exactly what happened, but I saw Khris going out defending me. That’s my big brother,” he added. “It means a lot. I always had his back, but now I have it even more.””Seeing Khris going out there defending me… that’s my big bro. It means a lot. I always had his back, but now I have it even more.” pic.twitter.com/1YuSWLZWZG— Milwaukee Bucks (@Bucks) December 5, 2019Bucks coach Mike Budenholzer felt his team channeled any frustration with Detroit’s roughhousing effectively.”I liked our fire in the second quarter. I liked our fire in general,” Budenholzer said. “I think the guys, they’re in a good place. They’re playing good basketball. So we’ll keep it going.” Tempers threatened to boil over this time, with Antetokounmpo and Griffin’s initial altercation coming after a second-quarter collision.NBA POWER RANKINGS:Bucks, Lakers look like title contenders; Knicks, Warriors sink to bottomIn the third, Milwaukee’s Khris Middleton confronted Griffin after the Pistons star stepped over a prone Antetokounmpo, who was on the floor after being fouled.Giannis didn’t like that Blake Griffin elbow. pic.twitter.com/jt09Hi676i— Dime (@DimeUPROXX) December 5, 2019Not today, Blake 🤚#FearTheDeer pic.twitter.com/VAJGPbZAnb— Milwaukee Bucks (@Bucks) December 5, 2019″There’s going to be a lot of teams that are going to come out and try to be physical with me — try to hit me, knock me down to the floor,” Antetokounmpo told reporters. “I just got to keep my composure. At first, I was trying to … talk back, let them know that this is more than basketball. We can stop playing basketball and we can fight.”At the end of the day, my teammates want me in the game, my teammates want me to keep my head in the game and I was like, ‘whatever.’ At this point, ‘whatever.'”Antetokounmpo was grateful for the intervention from Middleton, who scored 17 points. Giannis Antetokounmpo was ready to “fight” Blake Griffin during the Bucks’ fiery 127-103 victory over the Pistons.Antetokounmpo scored 35 points as the Bucks extended their hot streak to 13 consecutive wins — their best run since a 16-game winning streak spanning the 1972-73 and 1973-74 seasons. Milwaukee also boasts a dominant recent record against Detroit, having won all eight encounters across the regular season and playoffs last season before prevailing in the initial 2019-20 matchup.last_img read more

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DONEGAL DIRECTOR WINS IFTA GONG

first_imgA TV director from Donegal has won an IFTA awards for one of his documentaries, The Writing in the Sky.He was named Best Director of Television at the ceremony in Dublin last night.Garry Keane, (pictured in centre) a native of The Rock, Ballyshannon said he was “absolutely blown away” with winning the prize, Ireland’s oscars. Garry is a graduate of DLIAD and has worked in television for the last twenty years, first as a lighting cameraman and for the last twelve years as a director of documentaries. He was nominated by IFTA for Best Director in 2009 for the documentary Brief Encounters of a Sporting Mind.Garry was born and raised in Ballyshannon and educated at the De La Salle secondary school. He left Donegal in 1984 and went to UC Galway, then spent a year in New York but has always maintained his contact with home. DONEGAL DIRECTOR WINS IFTA GONG was last modified: February 12th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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