In 40th year, Bartner still hits right notes

first_imgOn the wall of Trojan Marching Band Director Arthur Bartner’s office hangs a photograph of an 800-piece band packed on the grass of the Coliseum in the shape of the United States.As 2.5 billion people from across the world watched, the band — including 150 members from USC — played for the Opening Ceremony in the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Olympics, under Bartner’s guiding hands. Twenty-five years later, Bartner is still leading the self-titled “Greatest Marching Band in the History of the Universe,” marking his 40th year at the helm this year.His forte · Art Bartner, director of the Trojan Marching Band, has been with the Spirit of Troy for 40 years and has led the band through 16 Rose Bowls and two platinum albums. – Dieuwertje Kast | Daily Trojan“He is the Spirit of Troy, believe me,” said Brad Calhoun, former Voice of Troy — the pre-game and half-time announcer at Trojan football games. “The band had humble beginnings, and he transformed it into one of the best.”Bartner, who hails from New Jersey, came to USC in 1970 after playing the trumpet in the University of Michigan marching band for four years and working as a high school band director.Back then, the band was having a hard time getting gigs with well-known musicians and did not have enough money for its budget.“Art was 30 years old when he started,” Calhoun said. “[But] Art had a vision, and the longevity and consistency of service allowed him to implement his vision to the benefit of the university and its alums.”At first, Bartner tried to model the marching band after his alma mater’s, but he said the highly disciplined style at Michigan did not work at USC.“USC students wanted their own style, so I developed a new style with help from the students and [former USC football player and assistant coach] Marv Goux,” he said.Bartner had met Goux, whom he calls a Trojan icon, shortly after he started working at USC, and ended up leaning on him for advice.“Goux took me under his wing and showed me how to be a Trojan,” Bartner said.Bartner said Goux, who died in 2002, encouraged him to go to football practices and watch the defensive linemen practice. Watching Goux work, Bartner said, made it easy for him to see the Trojan values of spirit, enthusiasm, competitiveness and intensity in action.“I try and bring those qualities to the band,” said Bartner.Thirty-one years later, when newly hired football coach Pete Carroll went to Goux to learn about Trojan tradition, Goux told Carroll to seek out Bartner.“Dr. Bartner basically taught Pete Carroll how to be a Trojan,” said Brett Padelford, the band’s public relations director and a former Spirit of Troy trumpet player. “They’ll do anything for eachother.”The connection between the band and the football team is something that both band members and alumni say is unique to USC.“The band and football team took off together when Pete came,” said Kenny Morris, a senior majoring in sociology and the band’s drum major. “Dr. Bartner looks to Pete Carroll a lot for inspiration.”Likewise, Carroll says he too considers Bartner a source of motivation.“I have so much respect for the work he does … The passion he’s always stood for has withstood all the years he’s been here,” Carroll said. “He’s demonstrated to the football team that there’s no reason you have to fluctuate your performances. Their performances have always been absolutely consistent.”The band has not missed afootball home or away game since 1987, and the entire group travels to both the USC-Notre Dame game and the Weekender, when USC plays either at Stanford or University of California, Berkeley.“We are very much a football band,” Bartner said. “Everything we do is geared to that team. The team is never far from our mind.”In addition to performing every week, Bartner’s career at the school spans 16 Rose Bowl performances, three Super Bowl performances, three Academy Awards appearances and two platinum albums. His tenure has also started several traditions, including the Lone Ranger theme that is played at the end of the third quarter, and the ritual of kicking the flagpole for good luck on the way to the Coliseum.And after 40 years, Bartner still has one of the most famous voices on campus. He can be heard during practice shouting directions, such as “Look at your accents!” in his signature gravelly timbre.“He’s literally the fire behind this band,” Morris said. “I don’t know how he does it.”Morris said Bartner’s tireless energy and enthusiasm is what propels the band to improve at every practice.“He is 69 years old and in better shape than 90 percent of the band, myself included,” Morris said. “He’ll have these paternal moments, like ‘He’s so wise, he’s such a great mentor,’ then he’ll yell at you to take a lap. You never know what to expect.”Band practice with Bartner is an intense experience with constant repetition of the Tribute to Troy, as well as new music and marching drills for every home game. Errant playerscommonly run the occasional lap and drop to the turf to do push-ups.The band members are so dedicated to the band that sometimes, Bartner said, they even do push-ups for their mistakes without being asked.“The deepest truth about Art Bartner is that his greatest joy is being a catalyst to draw out of others their gifts and talents,” Calhoun said.Morris said the band’s two mottos, “Never tired” and “It’s easy to be a good band, and difficult to be a great band,” reflect this intensity.“We yell harder, we play better, we march better,” Morris said. “Bartner tells us this will be the greatest year we will have.”Although Bartner and the band take their performances seriously, members say his quirky conducting style makes practice interesting.“My favorite is when he’ll yell at someone, ‘You in the red shirt!’ on Fridays, but everyone’s wearing red because that’s our red shirt day,” said Erica Dolcini, one of the members of the silks, USC’s color guard, and a junior majoring in public policy, management and planning. “As much as we make fun of him because he can’t hear us on the field, he still commands respect and has an aura of authority.”Ryan Suter, the leader of the tuba section and a senior majoring in critical studies, said Bartner’s dedication makes him a legend on campus.“He lives and breathes the USC Trojan Marching Band,” Suter said. “You hear him four days a week, whether or not you’re in the band.”Although some band members, including Morris, believe that Bartner will retire when Carroll does, Bartner insists his comments are not meant to be taken seriously.“I jokingly say I will not retire until Pete Carroll retires because I think the world of him. He makes Trojan football fun, exciting and vibrant,” Bartner said.Despite Rose Bowl shows, TV and movie performances, platinum albums and a career spanning four decades, Bartner is still happiest conducting the Spirit of Troy after a Trojan win.“The greatest, still mostexhilarating moment to me is after a hard-fought victory,” he said. “When the team comes over to the band and you get that Conquest, that’s still for me the most exciting moment.”last_img read more

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Whicker: John Havlicek’s legacy shows when Lou Williams leaps off the Clippers’ bench

first_imgHavlicek also did this without a single personal misstep. Back then we didn’t aim our Polaroids at our athletes, through every personal step they made. But not even TMZ would have laid a smudge on Havlicek.When Doc Rivers began coaching in Boston in 2007, he was shocked that all those guys who wore all those retired numbers weren’t coming around. The club wrote letters to every living Celtic.“I thought, ‘I’m coaching this franchise, my goodness, I want to see these guys around,’ ” Rivers said. “The very next day, John Havlicek came to the gym for practice. He came up and said, ‘Hi, I’m John Havlicek.’ Like I didn’t know.“I looked at him as the gentleman of sports. He was a fierce competitor and he had amazing humility. If we were all like him, we’d be in better shape.”But the Celtics were 32-50 when Havlicek retired in 1978. Two years later Larry Bird burst through the door and won a title the year after that. The country finally recognized the NBA, and Havlicek became the guy that Daddy used to mumble about, in the Barcalounger. But it’s hard to imagine that there were a dozen NBA players who were better. LOS ANGELES — Most of the time, a life must end to earn its proper commemoration. Behold John Havlicek.He passed away Thursday, at 79. He was the Boston Celtics’ all-time scorer and one of the most habitual winners in basketball history. He played in eight NBA Finals and won eight championships. His Ohio State teams won an NCAA championship and were 78-6.He was a nonstop dervish on the court who could score from random parts of the parquet and was an All-Defense selection five times.He preceded “load management.” In 11 of his 16 seasons, he played 80 or more games. He was a lifelong Celtic, and even though he averaged 20 points per game for his career, he put up 27.4, 25.9, 25.4 and 27.4 points per game in four consecutive playoff seasons, beginning in 1967. Havlicek also averaged more than 47 minutes in two of those long campaigns. For Lakers’ LeBron James, Jacob Blake’s shooting is bigger issue than a big Game 4 victory Kristaps Porzingis ruled out as Clippers, Mavericks set for Game 5; Follow for game updates “It’s something that was a tradition to Boston,” Rivers said. “It changed my thinking because they had so many guys like that, like McHale and Dave Cowens. I started doing it there, then I started doing it here. Mostly it’s better for a veteran, but a young guy like Trez (Montrezl Harrell) can handle it too.“But it’s good because if a guy starts complaining about not starting, I use that all the time. I say, John Havlicek and Kevin McHale didn’t start. A few years ago they might not have known who he was. But thanks to NBA TV and things like that, I think our league is in the best place it’s ever been in terms of the knowledge of the league. Now I don’t know that Shai (Gilgeous-Alexander, the Clippers’ rookie point guard) knows that I played. But that’s probably good.”Williams is malware for Golden State. The Warriors muffled him well in Games 3 and 4. But in the Clippers’ Game 2 and Game 5 wins in Oakland, Williams raged for 69 points in 68 minutes and shot 25 for 41 with 21 assists. There is no vaccine for him, at least on a whiteboard.The Staples Center crowd, having canceled all previous Friday night plans when the score came in Wednesday, came with one less reason to disbelieve. Could Williams steal a series the way Havlicek stole the ball? If he had a shining moment it was against Philadelphia in Game 7 of the 1965 Eastern finals, when Bill Russell threw a pass against a low-hanging wire and allowed the 76ers to get possession, down by just one. Havlicek chanted “one, two three” and on “four” he darted to grab Hal Greer’s inbounds pass. Play-by-play man Johnny Most yelled “Havlicek stole the ball!” over and over, a scene that was revived 22 years later when Larry Bird did it to Detroit’s Isiah Thomas, and Dennis Johnson won a Game 5 in the Garden.But Havlicek resonates today because of how he started. He didn’t start at all, in fact. He wasn’t the first Sixth Man of consequence. Boston’s Frank Ramsey was. But Havlicek showed how a substitute could reverse the rhythms, how he could come into a game and punish first-teamers or less-skilled reserves.The NBA began giving the Sixth Man award in 1983, to Bobby Jones of Philadelphia. It has passed through Kevin McHale, Ricky Pierce, Detlef Schrempf, Manu Ginobili, Jamal Crawford and, likely for a third time this season, will find Lou Williams, who has scored more career points than any sub in NBA history.Related Articlescenter_img Clippers hope they can play to their capabilities, quell Mavericks’ momentum What the Clippers are saying the day after Luka Doncic’s game-winner tied series, 2-2 Clippers vs. Mavericks Game 5 playoff updates from NBA beat reporters Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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Betty Jean Hutsler, 88, Caldwell, funeral services to be held Monday, Oct. 28, 2013

first_imgBetty HutslerBetty Jean Hutsler was welcomed into this world on August 6, 1925, by loving parents Homer Dee Hutsler, and Mamie Berry Hutlser and older sister Ruth. Betty was later a proud older sister to brothers Billy and Berry. Betty was born and raised on a farm in Drury.Betty and her family moved to Wichita in 1941.  She graduated from North High School at age 16. Betty then began employment at Hinkels Department Store, where she met her future husband.  Betty married her sweetheart, Bill on November 24, 1948. To this union three children were born: Phillip Steven, Kristina Ruth, and Ann Marie.Betty worked at Guys Foods as a bookkeeper until her retirement. After retiring, she and Bill moved back to Caldwell, her hometown. In her retirement years, she enjoyed traveling, camping at Roaring River Missouri, reading, word search puzzles, and jigsaw puzzles, she was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and enjoyed going to church. She loved spending time with her children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren and other family members and friends.  She is preceded in death by her parents, husband, brother Billy D Hutsler; and sister, Ruth Dermid.She is survived by her son Phillip Scott of Wichita, KS; daughters Kristina Ross and husband Ron of Wichita, KS, Ann Satterfield and her husband Eugene of Haysville, KS; brother Berry Hutsler of Caldwell, KS; grandchildren Aaron, Kristin, Steven, Leesa, Aimee, Brandon, Zackary, Samantha; great-grandchildren, Dakota, Noah, Tyson, Taylor Michael, Taylor Kristina, Aubrey, William, Kennedy, Sydney; and a host of other relatives and friends.Funeral services will be held 11:00 a.m. Monday, October 28, 2013 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Wellington.Graveside services will be held 2:00 p.m. Monday, October 28, 2013 at the Grandview Cemetery, Kaw City, Oklahoma.Memorials may be given in Betty’s name to the Caldwell Public Library, Caldwell.To share a memory or leave a condolence please visit www.schaeffermortuary.infoArrangements by Schaeffer Mortuary, Caldwell.last_img read more

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