OMSCC promises grand Toronto Cup 2 for Caribana weekend

first_imgBy Frederick HalleyTORONTO, Canada — Buoyed by the success of the inaugural Toronto Cup, staged in 2015, the executives of the Ontario Masters Softball Cricket Clubs (OMSCC) are extremely confident that its second edition, set for the first weekend in August will be a grand affair.This assurance was given at last Sunday’s annual general meeting of the OMSCC, held at the Birkdale Community Centre, Scarborough here where preliminary plans were disclosed by both president Azeem Khan and vice-president Paul Jaman.According to Jaman, despite the success of the tournament in 2015, which saw New York Enforcers emerge champions in the Open category and Our Own claim the Masters title, the OMSCC has no intention of sitting on its laurels but intends to make the Caribana weekend showcase even better.Jaman also pointed out that there are plans to have an entertainment segment between innings during the staging of the two finals, which are set for the University of Toronto ground on Sunday, August 6 but this depends entirely on sponsorship which the OMSCC is currently pursuing. He also gave the undertaking that grounds required for the three-day affair have already been secured.The vice-president also disclosed that while the main committee to deal with the running of the tournament has already been set up, the OMSCC is in much need of sponsorship and is seeking the assistance of members in this vital area.Teams from Guyana, New York and Florida have already indicated their interests in participating and will join their counterparts from Canada in what is expected to be a riveting weekend of softball cricket.Meanwhile, president Khan also disclosed, that through the initiative and sponsorship of Reliance Lions, there are plans to stage a Family Day. He, however, said further discussions are to be held with members of the club to finalise the date and venue.Khan also told members of plans to introduce a “captain’s trophy” as a special incentive for the most outstanding of the 2017 season. This will, however, not be based solely on statistics but on general demeanour and conduct. The president once again stressed the importance of good behaviour and cleanliness at venues, pointing to previous complaints from school authorities and city officials.Jaman also alluded to the fact that the league almost lost St Bede’s (a school ground) because broken bottles, resulting from drinking at the venue and urged members to desist from such behaviour. Despite these lapses, Jaman said 2016 was a great year for the OMSCC and implored players to “let’s make 2017 another great season”.Prior to the election of office-bearers for 2017, a proposal for an elected official from another cricket organisation to be allowed to hold an executive position on the OMSCC board was voted down. The president also took the opportunity to present a medal to treasurer Feizal Bacchus for his outstanding contribution to the organisation as treasurer and to the website.Vice-president Jaman, secretary Khem Singh, treasurer Feizal Bacchus and Over-50 coordinator Dickey Singh were all returned to their respective posts unopposed while the post of president was not contested based on the OMSCC’s constitution.Hardat Ramcharran was appointed the new umpires coordinator, replacing Ram Prashad who was eligible to serve another year but resigned for personal reasons. A new post, hat of website content administrator/statistician, went to Patrick Prashad.The disciplinary committee, which is chaired by vice-president Jaman, includes Ganesh Ramraj, Krishna Sarju, Bobby Ramlagan and Ramcharran.last_img read more

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Sumner County Weekly Jail Bookings: Oct. 13 – Oct. 20, 2014

first_imgMonday 0600  to  Monday 0600  WEEKLY   BOOKINGS 10/13/2014 thru 10/20/2014  Conway Springs  PD1 Griffis, Dustin M.26Wellington, KS610 E. Hillside Wellington, KSWPDServing Sentence10/18/14 Parrent, Justin O.33Wichita, KS610 E. Hillside Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence10/17/14 Weaver, Kevin C.34Wichita, KS1111 W 8th St. Wellington, KSWPDDUI, Refusal of PBT, Refusal to submit testing for 2nd DUI10/13/14 Brown, Melody M.39Indio, CA1100 N A St Wellington, KSSUSOObstructing apprehension of prosecution; Interference w/ LEO10/16/14 Wells, Jerry R.35Wichita, KS200 N C Suite 100 Wellington, KSWPDWarrant-Harrass by Telephone10/15/14 Mercer, Rex A.49Wichita, KS103 S 2nd Conway springs, KSCSPDViolation of Protection Order10/15/14 Worth, Paul D.56Lawrence, KSI35 MM 33 Mulvane, KSKHPDUI, Refusal of PBT10/16/14 Bookings Total57 Redford, Randall N.56Wichita, KS1000 N Poplar Wellington, KSWPDDUI, Improper driving on laned highway10/16/14 Amos, Season J.34Wichita, KS821 S. Jefferson, Wellington, KSSUSOInterference with LEO10/18/14 Hurt, Paul H.42Wichita, KS610 E. Hillside Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence10/17/14 Gressel, James R.20Holdridge, NB500 E 16th Wellington, KSWPDPossession of Opiate, Opium, Narcotic or certain stimulants; possession of drug paraphernalia10/16/14 Callaway, Curtis W.29Wellington, KS821 S Jefferson Wellington, KSWPDWarrant- Burglary, Theft10/18/14 Bergman, Lars L.28South Haven, KS610 E. Hillside Wellington, KSSUSOWarrant- Criminal use of Financial Card X4, Theft10/17/14 Sinclair, Zachary R.28Wichita, KS1100 E. 90th Ave N. Belle Plaine, KSBPPDDUI, TOC10/18/14 Hornecker, Dylan L.28Wellington, KS500 N G Wellington, KSWPDWarrant- FTA10/18/14 Sumner Newscow report — The following is the Sumner County Sheriff weekly jail bookings for Oct. 13 to Oct. 20, 2014:  Navagutierrez, Ricardo22Winfield, KS200 E Clark Oxford, KSOXPDDriving While Suspended10/19/14 Sedgwick Co35 Row, Michael A.26Wellington, KS610 E. Hilliside Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence10/18/14 Wellington PD7 Langford, Damon C.21Wellington, KS10th and Logan Belle Plaine, KSBPPDDUI, TOC10/20/14 NameAgeHome TownArrest locationAgencyChargesArrest date KHP1 Brown, Thomas C.32Braman, OK610 E. Hillside Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence10/17/14 Anderson-Stiles, Alice I.63Caldwell, KS425 W. 112th St. Caldwell, KSSUSOWarrant- Theft X210/17/14 Bryan, Lacrisha P.32Caldwell, KS610 E. Hillside Wellington, KSSUSOServing Sentence10/17/14         Ralph, Nicholas R.W.21Derby, KSSedgwick County JailSUSOBurglary, Theft (Felony), Burglary of a non-dwelling, Attempted Theft, Theft.10/16/14 Belle Plaine2 OXPD1 Sumner Co10last_img read more

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Metric system overhaul will dethrone the one true kilogram

first_img The real trickiness enters in sizing up the current and voltage, with quantum mechanical devices that do it in terms of the charge of the electron and the Planck constant. Now that the new SI has fixed those constants, the balance can be used to mete out a slug with a mass of exactly 1 kilogram. The redefinition also effectively makes the quantum techniques the SI standards for measuring voltages and currents, says James Olthoff, a NIST physicist. Until now, the SI has defined the ampere impractically, in terms of the force between infinitely long current carrying wires separated by a meter.But applying the complex new definitions will baffle anybody without an advanced degree in physics, argues Gary Price, a metrologist in Sydney, Australia, who used to advise Australia’s National Standards Commission. In fact, he argues, the new SI fails to meet one of the basic requirements of a units system, which is to specify the amount of mass with which to measure masses, the amount of length with which to measure lengths, and so on. “The new SI is not weights and measures at all,” Price says.Metrologists considered more intuitive redefinitions, Olthoff says. For example, you could define the kilogram as the mass of some big number of a particular atom. But such a standard would be impractical, Olthoff says. Somewhat ironically, researchers have already counted the atoms in exquisitely round, 1-kilogram spheres of silicon-28 to fix an exact value for the mole, formerly defined as the measurable number of carbon-12 atoms in 12 grams of the stuff.If approved, the new SI goes into effect in May 2019. In the short term, little will change, Pratt says. NIST will continue to propagate weight standards by calibrating its kilogram weights—although now it will do so with its Kibble balance. Eventually, Pratt says, researchers could develop tabletop balances that companies could use to calibrate their own microgram weights.Next up is a rethink of the second. Metrologists are developing more precise atomic clocks that use optical radiation with higher frequencies than the current cesium standard. They should form the basis for a finer definition of the second, De Mirandés says, perhaps in 2030.As for Le Grand K, BIPM will keep it and will periodically calibrate it as a secondary mass standard, De Mirandés says. That’s a fairly dignified end for a deposed French king. By Adrian ChoNov. 6, 2018 , 4:05 PM Metric system overhaul will dethrone the one, true kilogram Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Metric unitQuantityDefining constant Metric unitKilogramQuantityMassDefining constantPlanck constant Metric unitMeterQuantityDistanceDefining constantSpeed of light Metric unitSecondQuantityTimeDefining constantCesium radiation frequency Metric unitAmpereQuantityCurrentDefining constantElectron’s charge Metric unitKelvinQuantityTemperatureDefining constantBoltzmann constant Metric unitMoleQuantityAmount of substanceDefining constantAvogadro constant Metric unitCandelaQuantityLuminous intensityDefining constantEfficacy of light of a specific frequency The new SI generalizes the trade-off already exploited to define the meter more precisely in terms of the speed of light. Until 1983, light’s speed was something to be measured in terms of independently defined meters and seconds. However, that year, the 17th CGPM defined the speed of light as exactly 299,792,458 meters per second. The meter then became the measurable thing: the distance light travels in 1/299,792,458 seconds. (The second was pegged to the oscillations of microwave radiation from cesium atoms in 1967.)The new SI plays the same game with the other units. For example, it defines the kilogram in terms of the Planck constant, which pops up all over quantum mechanics. The constant is now fixed as exactly 6.62607015×10-34 kilogram meters squared per second. Because the kilogram appears in that definition, any experiment that previously measured the constant becomes a way to measure out a kilogram instead.Such experiments are much harder than clocking light speed, a staple of undergraduate physics. One technique employs a device called a Kibble balance, which is a bit like the mythical scales of justice. A mass on one side is counterbalanced by the electric force produced by an electrical coil on the other side, hanging in a magnetic field. To balance the weight, a current must run through the coil. Researchers can equate the mass to that current times an independent voltage generated when they remove the mass and move the coil up and down in the magnetic field. (DATA) INTERNATIONAL BUREAU OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img PTB Email Metric makeover An impending vote is expected to redefine metric base units in terms of fixed physical constants.  The atoms in a sphere of silicon-28 were counted to fix the Avogadro constant and redefine the mole. A copy of Le Grand K, the kilogram standard, can be seen in the sphere’s reflection.  Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Like an aging monarch, Le Grand K is about to bow to modernity. For 130 years, this gleaming cylinder of platinum-iridium alloy has served as the world’s standard for mass. Kept in a bell jar and locked away at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) in Sèvres, France, the weight has been taken out every 40 years or so to calibrate similar weights around the world. Now, in a revolution far less bloody than the one that cost King Louis XVI his head, it will cede its throne as the one, true kilogram.When the 26th General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) convenes next week in Versailles, France, representatives of the 60 member nations are expected to vote to redefine the International System of Units (SI) so that four of its base units—the kilogram, ampere, kelvin, and mole—are defined indirectly, in terms of physical constants that will be fixed by fiat. They’ll join the other three base units—the second, meter, and candela (a measure of a light’s perceived brightness)—that are already defined that way. The rewrite eliminates the last physical artifact used to define a unit, Le Grand K.The shift aims to make the units more stable and allow investigators to develop ever more precise and flexible techniques for converting the constants into measurement units. “That’s the beauty of the redefinition,” says Estefanía de Mirandés, a physicist at BIPM. “You are not limited to one technology.” But even proponents of the arcane changes acknowledge they may bewilder nonexperts. “Cooler heads have said, ‘What are we going to do about teaching people to use this?’” says Jon Pratt, a physicist at the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland.last_img read more

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