Pasadena Police Officers Association Denounces Killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis Police Custody

first_img Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Make a comment Police, Fire & The Courts Pasadena Police Officers Association Denounces Killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis Police Custody The Association issued a statement paying their respects to George Floyd and grieving for his death in police custody STAFF REPORT Published on Saturday, June 6, 2020 | 4:43 am Community News Subscribe Herbeauty10 Brutally Honest Reasons Why You’re Still SingleHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyRemove Belly Fat Without Going Under The KnifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNerdy Movie Kids Who Look Unrecognizable TodayHerbeautyHerbeauty faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena The Pasadena Police Officers Association released a statement Friday expressing condolences to the family of George Floyd and their “strong condemnation” of how Floyd was killed while in police custody.The statement said “the PPOA is grateful and thankful to all in the Pasadena community for their outpouring of continued support and for the mostly peaceful, non-violent demonstrations. The Pasadena Police Officers Association have worked hard for over seven years to enhance community and race relations in addition to much more.”The statement also contained comments from key Association officials.“The PPOA has worked collaboratively with the City Staff, Police Department, City leaders and others to do our part: time and time again whether it was to play a role reorganizing the department or continue to train our Police Officers to lead as the best in L.A. County, our State and Country we are working constantly on positive improvements and change,” said Roger Roldan, President of the Pasadena Police Officers Association.“From focusing on de-escalation, looking for alternatives to reduce the use of deadly force, increasing verbal and interpersonal skills, developing or using methods to be able to, at times, use non-lethal techniques or de-escalation when encountering weapons and dangerous calls for service: by employing wrestling and ground techniques – Pasadena Police lead with that and more,” said Roldan, described by the PPOA as “a decorated Sergeant with 23 years of service as a police officer with the Pasadena Police Department and a proud, honorably discharged Marine Corps Veteran (1989 to 1993) of Latino descent.”“We are not Minneapolis and proud of the work we do day in and day out to support our community and all who live, work and visit here” said David Llanes, a decorated 27-year police veteran, 24 years with the Pasadena Police Department, “who is a proud Officer of Asian Pacific Islander (API) descent.”“The Pasadena Police strongly support the community, their elected leaders and the excellent working relationship we have with Chief of Police John Perez and City Manager Steve Mermell” said Sam De Sylva, a decorated Police Sergeant 19 years of career service with the department,  who is a proud Sri Lankan member of the Indian American Community.“We are a highly diverse, motivated, well trained and supported police association and force with overall (sworn and non-sworn) 30.73% females, 43.94% Hispanic, 12.13% African American, 8.36% Asian and more” said De Sylva.“The public needs to know we are imperfect humans and have to make split-second decisions. Sometimes errors occur, but that is different than willful misconduct or actions that are illegal, immoral, violate department policy or go against our training and sworn oath to protect and serve,” said Llanes.“The strong and immense bond peace officers/first-responders have with each other as do other close-quarter working professions goes both ways,” said Maclaurin “Mac” Adesina, a decorated Corporal with 21 years in law enforcement, 15 years with the Pasadena Police Department and proud member of the African-American community. “Our strong desire to do a superlative job on duty — then safely, healthy each day with minimal physical and mental injuries go home to our loving families is also balanced with the fact we just don’t stick up for other peace officers during life-threatening calls for service [with people who knowingly or unknowingly want to harm the public and/or us]: we expect each and every one of our brother and sister Peace Officers to do it better and cleaner than any other profession or department. When one does it wrong or poorly we all look bad. We believe in accountability both ways and expect leaders to lead” further said Adesina.The statement also included a review with commentary of some highlights of “efforts the Chief, City Manager, PPOA and department put forth:• From the Chief’s Advisory Board (made up of many community advocates, ACLU, Churches, and NAACP);• The PPOA feeding the community through local charities and volunteering with Harvest Ministries to deliver hot meals to our seniors, during the pandemic.• Engaging and supporting community leaders.• Releasing critical incident BWC video.• The PPOA Law Enforcement Consultant Peter Mitchell and Performa Labs (a Cie company) launched a pilot program with the PPOA and PPD: to lend real-world expertise in creating a technology-based training tool focused on de-escalation, keeping in mind the safety of the Community and Officers as the highest priorities.• Internal training, de-escalation.• Community engagement beyond most other police agencies• Constantly exceeding state law and most police departments’ training curriculum and expectations.• Using daily de-escalation efforts at a time when a large number of weapons are being taken off the streets. As an example, more guns were taken off the streets during a certain month than days in the month —however, that doesn’t exclude us from being accountable for our actions and our policing culture.• Having internal discussion, ongoing training, and teaching our sworn officers the value of respect through de-escalation so we are achieving much, but that is never enough — officers are taught in the department to intervene to stop bad conduct and to report it. We have more to do, more to accomplish.• The department mindset must be in line with the community so our goals on crime, safety, and the fear of crime, are the same and not opposite. The outcome has been positive with a 50% decline in use of force, increase in implicit bias and communication training, and a 70% drop in the use of a certain type of force techniques. This is not enough but we are continuing our efforts.• Having a BWC video program for three years and we regularly release video as well as use it to train all personnel for review. We provide implicit bias training and closely screen our recruits as well as try and ensure they come from our local neighborhoods.”“During these incredible troubling and dangerous times we wanted to let you the public know what we thought of the tragedy of Mr. Floyd in Minneapolis plus lending our voice to what we have done for the past, current and future improvements in Pasadena,” said Roldan.“We stand strongly by our excellent working relationship and valued city leaders such as the City Manager Steve Mermell, Chief of Police John Perez, some other City Employees and our City Council. We have a world-class City Council with thanks to all of them for their service.”The remarks closed with “special thanks for years working with our leaders: Victor Gordo, Gene Masuda, Steve Madison, Andy Wilson. Also on the Public Safety Committee with thanks to John Kennedy, Tyron Hampton and Terry Tornek. To incoming Councilmember Felicia Williams. Sending thanks to retiring Councilmember Margaret McAustin for her service.”For more information, visit https://pasadenapoa.com/ or visit their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/ThePPOA/ 27 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week center_img Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  More Cool Stuff Business News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Top of the News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday last_img read more

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International Women’s Day LIT

first_imgLimerickNewsInternational Women’s Day LITBy Sarah Carr – March 8, 2021 105 Email Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener At the flag raising this morning was from l to r Dr Tracy FaheyHead of Department of Fine Art and Education; Jess Tobin, Training Programme Coordinator; Leader Print Contemporary Practice and [email protected] Artistic Director, Fiona Quill; and Dr Carol Wrenn, Equality Diversity and Inclusion Manager. At the flag raising this morning was from l to r President of LIT Professor Vincent Cunnane and Marian Duggan, Vice President Academic Affairs & Registrar, LIT. Roisin Upton excited by “hockey talent coming through” in Limerick WhatsApp TAGSInternational Women’s DayKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick PostLIT Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Print At the flag raising this morning was from l to r Dr Tracy FaheyHead of Department of Fine Art and Education Jess Tobin, Training Programme Coordinator; President of LIT Professor Vincent Cunnane; LIT Programme Leader Print Contemporary Practice and [email protected] Artistic Director, Fiona Quill; Dr Carol Wrenn, Equality Diversity and Inclusion Manager, LIT and Marian Duggan, Vice President Academic Affairs & Registrar, LIT. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin Advertisement Facebook Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live LIMERICK Institute of Technology began International Women’s Day 2021 by raising the International Women’s Day flag at its campuses this morning. The flag raising ceremony was followed by a number of online events in recognition of the United Nations theme for international women’s day Women in leadership: Achieving an equal future in a COVID-19 world.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up LIT’s flagship International Women’s Day event “Conversations on Creativity during Covid” which is scheduled for this lunchtime – has been sold out, but will be available to view free of charge on lit.ie this afternoon. Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Twitter WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Previous articleRemembrance mass to be held for man whose unidentified remains were recovered 25 years ago while family continued to search for himNext article490 volunteers attend Tidy Towns webinar hosted by Limerick City and County Council Sarah Carrhttp://www.limerickpost.ie last_img read more

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Aminess Grand Azur Hotel is a Travelife Gold certificate holder

first_imgAminess Grand Azur Hotel in Orebic received a prestigious Travelife Gold certificate, one of the most prestigious awards for sustainable business in tourism, which confirms that the hotel adheres to the strictest ethical and environmental standards in its business. The protection of the environment, animals and biodiversity, local culture and heritage, the relationship with the local community and employees and support for the local economy are just some of the standards that Aminess Grand Azur Hotel has successfully met according to Travelife Gold certification standards. In each of the 185 rooms and suites guests Aminess Grand Azur Hotel expects a panoramic view of the sea that connects Peljesac with nearby Korcula. The hotel offers two renovated freshwater swimming pools and a sun terrace, and the restaurants serve Mediterranean cuisine prepared with homemade olive oil, along with a selection of local red wines. “We are proud that Aminess Grand Azur Hotel meets the highest standards of sustainable development. The Travelife Gold certificate is the result of our continuous and dedicated work in this area, which we plan to continue to deal with in the future. This certificate is also a confirmation of our previous achievements and efforts to provide all our guests with a pleasant stay.” said Marina Brčić, director of Aminess Grand Azura. Travelife is an international certification system that promotes sustainability within the tourism industry, which is an important segment of the tourism business, helping to preserve the unique natural and cultural features of the destination. In addition to the Aminess Grand Azur Hotel in Orebić, the Aminess Lume Hotel on Korčula has also been the proud holder of the Travelife Gold certificate since this year, while the Aminess Maestral Hotel in Novigrad has been the holder of the certificate since 2013. Travelife has approximately 1500 members in more than 50 countries around the world, and this certificate is recognized and promoted by the world’s umbrella institution for sustainability in tourism, GSTC – Global Sustainable Tourism Council.last_img read more

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Big disappointment among US-based Guyanese female athletes

first_imgBy Ras WadadaSEVERAL young Guyanese females who are currently on athletic scholarships across the United States of America (USA) are extremely disappointed at the cancellation of this year’s Track & Field season due to the global COV-19 pandemic, but remain optimistic for the future.The announcement by the organisers to call off the season came on the eve of the NCAA division 1 Indoor Championships which were set for New Mexico on March 13 and 14, while the Outdoor Championships were scheduled for June 10 to 13 in Austin, Texas.The two main attractions and much anticipated events, annually, have left a bitter taste in the mouths of the thousands of athletes who were expecting to use these meets as prime paths to the quadrennial global showpiece, the Olympics.Among the athletes affected are the ‘crème de la crème’ of Guyanese females who spoke to Chronicle Sport directly via telephone.  Final year Clemson University’s Health Science student, Andre Foster who was ranked number one in the world indoors 800M earlier in the year, shared her feelings of disappointment.“This year’s cancellation really hit home for me since I was well focused on qualifying for the Olympics, but I know God has other plans. The cancellation of the Indoors was a bitter pill to swallow because this was my first time making it to Nationals for Clemson University and it was also my first step towards my big goal, Tokyo 2020.Claudrice McKoyThe news came on the eve of the Championship and it happened to be my birthday so you can imagine how much discouraging a moment that was. Thanks to my coach and team mates I was able to look at the brighter picture and be reminded by the words of my coach that ‘it wasn’t by luck that you have made it and you can definitely do it again’.“I left New Mexico very disappointed, but had higher hopes for the outdoors, and then when the announcement of the cancellation of all spring meets was made, I literally broke down in tears. I, however, found hope in the belief I can still make it to the Olympics so I kept training and fixed my focus but when that was cancelled too I realised and understood that it was out of my control. COVID-19 has changed a lot of things and norms for me, but it definitely hasn’t changed my mindset. It’s hard training from home but I am making the best of it”, the 23 year-old former Bladen Hall Multilateral student related.At Texas Tech University, 20 year-old Caludrice McKoy, who is majoring in Human Sciences and was expected to get her first taste of NCAA Division One Track and Field Championships opined that while she was upset, she can relate to the circumstances and necessary actions taken.“I must admit I was very disappointed with the cancellation, but with that being said, I think it was the correct decision to cancel the championship since health and safety comes first. I think it was done in the best interest of the student-athletes and to protect all stakeholders involved”. The former Central High/Chase Academy Foundation student who won CARIFTA Gold in the 3,000M and 1,500M as well as Bronze in both events on different occasions is not too bothered about the confinement indoors due to the Coronavirus pandemic.“I am coping well, both, physically and mentally, with COVID-19. Personally, I am not the outgoing kind of person so being confined to my home, which is not too far from campus, even though we are not in mandatory lockdown, is not a problem for me. I just hope that the Coronavirus which is causing the COVID-19 gets under control sooner rather than later so that we can all return to a state of normalcy. Most mornings I get on Zoom, with a video interaction App, and linkup with my compatriots and we workout together. I also, occasionally, go for 45 minute-long runs”.The other Running Brave-raised athlete who had high expectations for her debut NCAA Division 1 Track and Field Championship is 22 year-old triple-jumper Natricia Hooper who is in her second year of a full scholarship at the renowned University of Florida, but she had to call off her start again with the Gators after injury kept her out for the first year.“My emotions were all over the place for the first two weeks, as I was planning to launch my season on March 27th. The cancellation of the track season is dispiriting and I woke up each day hoping that is was all a dream, then I came to my senses and knew nothing would change. I then started to look at the positive side-effects of this pandemic, because this too shall pass. I am staying inside and taking advantage of this free time by doing things to keep my spirit uplifted and I am still working on my goals, doing small workouts on my own like jogging, drills and plyos so as to remain in shape”, the former New Campbellville Secondary student stated to Chronicle Sport. Hooper, who is pursuing a Masters in Sports Management, indicated that next year she hopes to conduct a Jump clinic called Jumpomatic in Guyana. She concluded, ‘Currently I am focusing on finishing my University studies and then starting my professional career’.Natricia HooperFormer Christ Church Secondary student Avon Samuels who is in her first year at St. John’s University is also distraught at the current effects of the global pandemic, ”I am affected physically and mentally since a lot of hard work was put in everyday of the week; since  I understand what it demands to compete at the NCAA level of competition. I saw constant improvement and I was being motivated. I was growing in confidence then all my hopes were taken away with this COVID19. I have lost the moments I wasn’t fortunate enough to experience and it plays with me mentally. I have made lots of sacrifices to get where I am presently…no one knows what I’ve been through. It’s very hard on me, but now I understand that my health is more important. COVID19 shows me that nothing is guaranteed, so I have to live and bury this feeling forever. What’s for me will be for me”, the 20 year-old 200M and 400M specialist, who is majoring in Business Administration, disappointingly asserted.      University of Texas El Paso sophomore Long and triple jumper, Chantoba Bright who attended the Mckenzie High School while conveying her displeasure remains optimistic.“I am one who is very disappointed that the track season was called off because I really have   been training hard and had a great indoor season so I was confident of producing an awesome outdoor season. Add to that the fact that I was training with the mindset of qualifying for the Olympics, so I was ready to go out there and leave it all at the pit, but I guess God knows best and therefore I am trusting the process and using this as an opportunity for me to work harder, heal and get closer to achieving my goals on and off the track. I am remaining positive and looking at the bigger picture and the brighter side of everything that is happening.I must admit that this lockdown period is really doing me good since I have been using the time to really assess myself, reflect on my journey so far and truly work on my career and education. I am still training at home and doing classes online. It is not difficult to stay focused because I am a self-motivated and usually indoors chilling by myself, so this situation is not strange to me”, the Environmental Science major informed.One athlete who managed to return home the day before the closure of the airports, here in Guyana, is 19 year-old Joanna Archer who was able to complete her two-year studies, online, at Munroe College in NY and is now heading to Texas Tech where she will commence her scholarship, majoring in Criminology and with a minor in Communication studies in the fall of 2020.The former West Demerara Secondary student expressed her set back and her thanks due to the current pandemic,”COVID-19 has really interrupted my plans to run faster during the outdoor season as I had a fairly great indoor season running better than last season, so I know I was only going to get better outdoor. I should also say that I am thankful in a way for this current break as during the Indoor season an old knee injury acted up but my mental strength was enough to get me through the season. As a believer in “what is meant to be will be” I take comfort in knowing God has plans beyond my imagination. I trust God and to me I feel like it’s my healing season and in 2021 I’ll come back stronger and faster. At the moment because of the lockdown I am basically improvising indoors at home. It’s no secret that this virus stole a lot from me, but it wouldn’t take my faith and confidence in my talent”, the 800M Specialist declared.The chief nurturer of the aforementioned athletes, except Bright and Archer, is Coach Julian Edmond who disclosed to Chronicle Sport the reason for the success of the Guyanese athletic club established in 2006, “At Running Brave Track and Field Club, we, inclusive of president Trevor Williams and Co-coach Sham Johnny, work hard to let the athletes believe in themselves through commitment and discipline and having patience…it’s hard work.One of the primary goals of every athlete we produce is to become champion of their respective category in the country. We also have seen an increase in selections on Junior CARIFTA Games from our club and this has to do with our solid preparation/foundation work which starts in November. These athletes on scholarships in the USA all have the potential to go on to bigger things, but I think Andrea Foster and Natricia Hooper are likely to give Guyana its first athletic medal at the Olympics”, a proud Edmond predicted.last_img read more

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