Man City flop could be Chelsea-bound after agent refuses to rule out switch

first_imgSavic won the Premier League title with Manchester City in 2011/12 but was sent to Fiorentina in a swap deal for Matija Nastasic the following summer, just 12 months after joining from Partizan Belgrade.With Chelsea and Juventus both circling, centre-back’s agent Zarko Pelicic told TuttoJuve: “Stefan is a player who is always very interesting.“He has top quality, he can play for any of the top four teams in the best leagues.“Juventus? I can’t name names, everything goes through the club.“He’s currently an Atletico Madrid player, we’ll evaluate what’s best for the club and the lad.” 1 Savic is Montenegro’s vice-captain, and has 48 caps since his debut for the national team in 2010 center_img Stefan Savic could be on his way to Stamford Bridge this summer after his agent refused to rule out a move away from Atletico Madrid.The Montenegrin centre-back, 27, was linked to Chelsea as he looks to move away from the Wanda Metropolitano, where he finds himself behind Diego Godin and Jose Gimenez in the p-ecking order.last_img read more

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Conference looks at how First Nations can be involved in marijuana industry

first_imgVANCOUVER — The cannabis industry is seen by some First Nations as an opportunity to take the initiative and get out of poverty, says the regional chief of the B.C. Assembly of First Nations.Cultivating, buying or selling cannabis could provide economic support to those First Nations devastated by a downturn in the province’s forest industry, Terry Teegee said Wednesday at a summit on cannabis held by the Assembly of First Nations.  “A lot of the communities are tired of living in poverty,” he said.“It’s an opportunity for your community to assert your jurisdiction, assert your self-determination. We want to be a part of the community.”The two-day First Nations Cannabis Summit is attended by chiefs or their representatives from across the country to hear about policy, safety, health, and social and economic development.There are varying points of view among First Nations on how involved they want to be in the cannabis industry with some “dead set against it,” while others look at it as an economic development opportunity, Teegee said.While he doesn’t have statistics on how many First Nations want to be involved in the cannabis industry, Teegee said eight licences out of 122 were given to First Nations in Ontario.“So in Ontario that’s a real issue because there’s a lot more than eight First Nations interested in having a distribution site or cultivating them.”Teegee said it’s unclear how much money can be made in the industry because there’s been a limited number of licences distributed in most of Canada.“The only one that came out aggressively has been Alberta and that’s why you see Alberta leading the nation in terms of tax revenue,” Teegee said.Sam Wesley, owner of Nations, an Indigenous-controlled cannabis production company based in Burns Lake, B.C., said one of the main challenges for First Nations is financial backing.But there is still room for First Nations to get involved in the industry, he said, adding that profits could be used to fund housing or other projects. Sonia Eggerman, a lawyer with MLT Aikins who has extensive experience with Aboriginal and treaty rights, said after speaking to the conference that current federal and provincial regulations have cut First Nations out of opportunities to take part in the cannabis industry.“And I think that’s a real missed opportunity,” she said.Drew Lafond, also with MLT Aikins, said the key obstacle is lack of meaningful engagement by the federal government to work with First Nations.“Much like gaming and tobacco, cannabis carries a spiritual connotation, has traditional significance, medicinal significance, plus socio-economic significance,” he said.“From a legal perspective, it’s an area that First Nations have a close relationship with historically. So breadth and history are the two things that make this such a huge issue in Indigenous country.”Hina Alam, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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TCI will not fall off the fiscal cliff says Premier national facelift

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, March 20, 2017 – Providenciales – The Turks and Caicos needs a facelift and according to the new finance minister, Sharlene Robinson her administration plans to give it one.  “We are going to have some capital projects that are desperately needed, so you would see in terms of infrastructure, major infrastructure happening,  we have to give the country pretty much a facelift and improve the looks and also while addressing immediate needs in the different islands.”The budget will be late but it will not fall outside of the constitutional timeline,  that means no falling over the fiscal cliff for these islands.   “We have a house meeting that’s coming up in which I will present something know as a Provisional Warrant, that would allow the government to continue to function on a twelfth of the budget until the budget is actually passed.  So you will see that Provisional Warrant coming out this month.”Minister Sharlene Robinson recently addressed media on money matters and said the budget allocation will remain the same, she said for the upcoming fiscal year.   “We are pleased that already we have pretty much agreed new spend, which is the recurring budget, and I can say to you that you will see spending in the area of Law Enforcement, Policing, Primary Health Care and certain priorities for us, but in particular in policing and prison you would see quite a bit of support.”The Rufus Ewing regime had allotted $255.7 million for 2016-17 period.  Minister Robinson said it is not comprehensively a PDM Budget because her team will be continuing PNP projects from as far back as two years ago 2015.#MagneticMediaNews#TCItogetnationalfacelift#betterinfrastructureforTCI Related Items:#betterinfrastructureforTCI, #magneticmedianews, #TCItogetnationalfacelift Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

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