Après Ski

first_imgAprès ski. There’s no way to say it without sounding like a complete douche, and yet no two words in any language get me as excited. Roughly translated from the original French, après ski means, “I drank too much champagne and fell in the hot tub while still wearing my ski boots.”I’m paraphrasing, but you get the gist.Sadly, there are no champagne/hot tub accidents where I ski. Because, you see children, my local ski hill is in a dry county. There are no shot skis. No Jager luges. No bar with cougars trolling for ski bums. When the lifts shut down, our only après ski option is to head to the nearest Steak n’ Shake for burgers. N’ shakes. The struggle is real.I’m not a wise man, but I’ve learned a few things in my 39 years on this planet. For instance, I know that making peace with your own limitations is the key to happiness. Well, it’s one of the keys to happiness. There are probably 12 keys to happiness in total. I don’t know, like I said, I’m not a wise man. But 12 seems like the right number.A couple of other keys to happiness I figured out along the way: marry someone who’s out of your league. Conventional wisdom says you should stick to your own classifications for attractiveness when finding a life partner. If you’re a seven, marry a seven. But trust me, waking up to someone who’s significantly hotter than you will make you happy.Also, listen to a lot of Beastie Boys.But back to accepting your own limitations. What I’m really taking about here is the Southern Appalachians during ski season. We have a lot of really great ski resorts to choose from in the South, and during a banner year, there is even some cross country and backcountry turns to be had. But you simply can’t compare the Southern Apps to the Rockies, or even the Northern Appalachians for that matter. We just don’t have the snow. It’s a matter of math. The South has a lot of fine qualities that make up for the lack of snow (boiled peanuts, bourbon), but you can’t argue with math.It took me a while to come to terms with the Southern Appalachians’ geographical limitations, but as soon as I accepted those limitations, and made peace with a winter that was less snowy, I started enjoying the ski season more. I’ve accepted a winter full of man-made snow and the occasional dusting of God-given powder. I can accept a ski resort that only gets 60 inches of natural snow a year, but I cannot accept a resort that has no bar in the lodge, or anywhere within a 10-mile radius, for that matter. You have to drive 20 minutes across the county line to get a beer. And that beer is in an Ingles. You gotta drive all the way back to Asheville to hit a legitimate bar, and then you’re the only one wearing ski boots and still sporting goggles. That’s not après ski. That’s just drinking.Our lack of snow is a matter of geography. The lack of booze at my hill is human error. Fortunately, it’s an isolated situation; there are plenty of great après ski options in the South. Beech has a killer bar on top of the mountain. They even have their own brewery. Whitegrass Café, at the base of Whitegrass ski touring center, is a veritable party after a good powder day. In fact, the resort where I hold my season pass might be the only dry ski resort below the Mason Dixon.The lack of a bar at my local hill is frustrating, mostly because I don’t want to ski anywhere else. I like the terrain. The ski patrol lets me skin up the hill during the week. The lifties wear denim and blast classic rock from mid-station. Why can’t this mountain have a damn bar? And more snow, but we already talked about that, so I’m gonna let it go. But the bar…the lack of a bar is a tough thing to let go.Alas, when the world gives you lemons, you make lemonade. Then spike that lemonade with vodka.So in lieu of a legitimate bar, we tailgate. We pop the trunk on our SUV, brandish a cooler full of quality local beer and crank the Phil Collins, right there in the middle of the parking lot. You’ll see a few other people doing the same, particularly during that hour between the day session and the night session when the mountain is closed for grooming. Dudes retreat to their trunks and sit, nursing a few beers, tired but ready to hit the hill again after dark. We talk about how the mountain needs a bar. How the food could be better. And how much we like the mountain anyway, in spite of all of its flaws. Or maybe because of them, it’s hard to tell. And really, who needs a snooty après ski bar with overpriced Bud Light, when you can après ski in your own trunk. SEC football style.last_img read more

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ADB projects Indonesia’s economy to grow 2.5% in 2020

first_img“If decisive actions to contain the health and economic impacts of the outbreak, particularly to safeguard the poor and vulnerable, can be effectively implemented, the economy is expected to gradually return to its growth trajectory next year,” he added.Indonesia GDP growth forecasts by Asian Development Bank (ADB). (ADB/Asian Development Outlook 2020)ADB is among a slew of institutions predicting that the COVID-19 pandemic will significantly slow Indonesia’s economic growth this year. The World Bank, for instance, predicted that growth will sit at 2.1 percent in 2020, down from 5.1 percent initially projected, if the situation starts to normalize by June.This compares with the government’s expectation of 2.3 percent economic growth in its baseline scenario this year, the lowest since 1999, which could deteriorate to a 0.4 percent economic contraction in a worst-case scenario. Indonesia’s economy is expected to grow by only 2.5 percent this year, from a four-year low of 5.02 percent in 2019, according to a new Asian Development Bank (ADB) report. The situation, caused largely by the COVID-19 outbreak, is expected to gradually improve in 2021.ADB’s flagship annual economic publication titled “Asian Development Outlook 2020” indicates that the COVID-19 pandemic, along with lower commodity prices and volatile financial markets, will have severe implications for the global economy and Indonesia this year, with the economies of the country’s key trading partners expecting to suffer. “Despite Indonesia’s strong macroeconomic fundamentals, the COVID-19 outbreak has changed the course of the economy, with the external environment deteriorating and domestic demand weakening,” ADB country director for Indonesia Winfried Wicklein said in a press statement released Friday. Read also: Indonesia’s economy may contract 0.4% in worst case scenario: Sri MulyaniThe ADB report says domestic demand is expected to weaken, as business and consumer sentiment wanes. However, as the global economy is poised to recover next year, Indonesia’s growth is expected to gain momentum, with recently introduced investment reforms providing an additional impetus.Inflation, which averaged 2.8 percent last year, is forecast to edge up to 3 percent in 2020, before declining to 2.8 percent in 2021, the report reads. Inflationary pressure from tight food supplies and currency depreciation is expected to be partially offset by lower prices for non-subsidized fuel, as well as additional subsidies for electricity and food.Meanwhile, export earnings from tourism and commodities are projected to decline, leading to a current account deficit of 2.9 percent of GDP in 2020. As exports and investment resume in 2021, a higher volume of imported capital goods will keep the current account deficit at the same level as 2020.ADB says the government and financial authorities have deployed “well-coordinated” and “targeted” fiscal and monetary measures to mitigate the impact of a pandemic on the economy and people’s livelihoods, including the “timely” disbursement of social transfers for the poor and vulnerable, as well as tax cuts and loan-payment relief for workers and businesses.”Externally, risks to Indonesia’s economic outlook include an extended outbreak of COVID-19, further declines in commodity prices, and increased finance market volatility. Domestically, the outlook will depend on how quickly and effectively the spread of the pandemic can be contained. Constraints in the healthcare system, along with the challenges of imposing social distancing, could worsen the impact on the economy,” the press release reads.Topics :last_img read more

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New unemployment claims back up, ongoing claims drop again

first_imgDES MOINES — Overall unemployment claims were down last week despite an increase in first-time claims. The first time claims were up after dropping by nearly 50 percent the previous week.  Iowa Workforce Development deputy director Ryan West isn’t sure why there was such a swing. “It”s hard telling. I think as we start to decline out of this — you are going to have a little bit of fluctuation up and down like that,” West says. “And then ultimately you’ll start to continue on a downward slope ideally, and those numbers will lessen each week.”  He says they need some more weeks of data to nail down a trend. The loosening of COVID-19 restrictions has let more business open back up and West says that’s reflected in the drop in ongoing unemployment claims. “I think so, and that’s a good sign. As the weather gets warmer it’s continued to be warm…and there’s more stuff that’ll be lifted. It’s a great time that people can start to be getting back into those jobs…We really need to get through June and July in my personal opinion to see where we are with things,” West says. West says one thing is certain — there are plenty of jobs for those who want to get back to work.  “We have jobs everywhere, employment available and I really think we’ll see that people are going to find opportunities that they may not have looked for in the past,” West says. West says you can go to IowaWorkforce.gov to find out more about available jobs.last_img read more

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Allardyce exit leaves England a laughing stock yet again

first_imgLondon, United Kingdom | AFP | As Sam Allardyce beat a shame-faced retreat from Wembley after being forced out as England manager, his place as a punchline in the national team’s ever-expanding hall of shame was already etched in stone.Allardyce had coveted the England post for decades and proudly hailed his appointment in July as an overdue chance to seize the spotlight after being denied a crack at one of the Premier League’s top clubs.Yet like so many who came before him, the 61-year-old has discovered why managing England has been described as the ‘impossible job’, a ‘poisoned chalice’ and now, undeniably, a laughing stock after his departure only one match and 67 days into a dream job that quickly turned into a nightmare.Given the unrealistic expectations attached to the England job, it’s hardly surprising few get to leave with their heads held high.But something about the experience of pulling on a tracksuit with the Three Lions badge seems to induce astonishing lapses in judgement from England’s managers.From Steve McClaren’s wally with the brolly denouement to Sven Goran Eriksson’s daliance with a fake sheikh via Glenn Hoddle’s extraordinary views of reincarnation, there is rarely a dull moment for those who chronicle the men in the England hot-seat.Even by those farcical standards, Allardyce’s astonishingly rapid fall from grace seems especially fitting in its self-inflicted arrogance and needless naivety.Surveying the damage done to a once prestigious post, former England and Manchester United defender Rio Ferdinand summed up just how pitiful the national team now looks in the eyes of the world.“The rest of the football community around the world will be laughing at us. The England role has become comical,” Ferdinand said.“This was a man who was passionate about getting the job. He forced the FA to act.“Naivety seems to be the word coming up. It’s disappointing for English football.”Allardyce had been appointed to replace Roy Hodgson after England’s miserable Euro 2016 campaign ended with a shock last-16 exit against minnows Iceland.Hodgson, a decent man whose only crime was being over-promoted, departed in abject misery after being forced to endure a painful grilling in his exit press conference.  Tawdry tale Somehow, Allardyce found an even more demeaning way to go down in flames.Despite the warning of Eriksson’s brush with undercover reporters, a tawdry tale that almost cost the Swede the England job in 2006, Allardyce still agreed to exchange gossip and trade secrets with a group of men he didn’t know in a London hotel only days after taking charge.That those men were actually undercover reporters posing as Far East businessmen can’t even have come as that much of a surprise to Allardyce given his own past experience of a secret television investigation that led him to be accused of taking bungs to facilitate transfers — a charge he was eventually cleared of.Asked by the reporters if it would be a problem for their fictitious agency to get involved in third-party ownership through funding football transfers, which is banned under FIFA rules, Allardyce said he knew of certain agents who were “doing it all the time” and added: “You can still get around it. I mean obviously the big money’s here.”He compounded his error by crassly referring to Hodgson as “Woy”, mimicking his speech impediment, and said the FA had “stupidly spent 870 million pounds” rebuilding Wembley, while also complaining that Prince William, the FA president, had not attended last week’s Euro 2020 launch event in London.Allardyce criticised Hodgson’s approach at Euro 2016, saying he was “too indecisive” and “hasn’t got the personality for public speaking”.Still not finished, he poured scorn on England’s failure at the tournament by saying their players have a “psychological barrier” and “can’t cope”.It was all too much for the image conscious FA, who summoned Allardyce down to London from his home in Bolton in north-west England before wielding the axe.Mutual consent was the FA’s agreed phrasing, but Allardyce’s admission that he was “deeply disappointed” told the real story.England Under-21 coach Gareth Southgate has agreed to take charge of the senior team’s next four matches.But for the second time in three months, the Football Association have to embark on a search for a new man to fill a position that increasingly seems like the very last job any self-respecting coach would want. Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

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